Catalogue


On to Atlanta : the Civil War diaries of John Hill Ferguson, Illinois Tenth Regiment of Volunteers /
edited by Janet Correll Ellison with assistance from Mark A. Weitz.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2001.
description
xxvi, 161 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
080322012X (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2001.
isbn
080322012X (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4637334
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Readers will entirely enjoy On to Atlanta . It is genuine, uniquely personal, and close-up. They will like John Hill Ferguson. He was a good and decent man, with a keen eye for observation."Larry G. Ligget, Historians of the Civil War Theater
"Ferguson''s account helps answer what the great scholars have been trying to understand for more than a century. What was the life of a soldier like in the Union and Confederate armies? Ferguson''s own writings help explain exactly what life was like in Sherman''s army. . . . Ferguson''s diaries will prove very important to scholars of the war, adding a much-needed human touch to the perception of Sherman''s army."Aaron Crawford,Civil War History
"Ferguson''s account helps answer what the great scholars have been trying to understand for more than a century. What was the life of a soldier like in the Union and Confederate armies? Ferguson''s own writings help explain exactly what life was like in Sherman''s army. . . . Ferguson''s diaries will prove very important to scholars of the war, adding a much-needed human touch to the perception of Sherman''s army."Aaron Crawford, Civil War History
"Ferguson''s diary provides a detailed account of Sherman's campaign against Atlanta and is important to historians who study that aspect of the Civil War.... This work will interest people studying Georgia in the Civil War, especially the soldiers who served in the state, the destruction of public and private property, and the civilians who lived through the experience."GeorgiaHistorical Quarterly
"Ferguson''s diary provides a detailed account of Sherman's campaign against Atlanta and is important to historians who study that aspect of the Civil War.... This work will interest people studying Georgia in the Civil War, especially the soldiers who served in the state, the destruction of public and private property, and the civilians who lived through the experience." Georgia Historical Quarterly
"Readers will entirely enjoyOn to Atlanta. It is genuine, uniquely personal, and close-up. They will like John Hill Ferguson. He was a good and descent man, with a keen eye for observation."Larry G. Ligget,Historians of the Civil War Theater
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Summaries
Main Description
Historians have shown us the drama and sweep of the swathe Sherman's March cut through the South. Officers have bequeathed us accounts of what happened in strategic and practical terms. But for a gritty, day-by-day, on-the-ground view of what the march to Atlanta meant to the common soldier, nothing can compare to the diary of an enlisted man like John Hill Ferguson.A Scottish immigrant and a U.S. citizen since 1856, Ferguson enlisted in the Illinois Veteran Volunteers in 1860 and shortly afterward began to keep a diary. The annotated entries presented here, from 1864 and 1865, describe life in the Tenth Illinois as the troops made their way through Georgia under Sherman. In these pages the details of Civil War soldiering - the aching feet, insect-ridden biscuits, foul water, brutal weather - become real, immediate, and personal, as do the daily dramas, large and small, of life on the march. Smallpox struck Ferguson's unit early on, decimating his company; food, when there was any, was invariably poor; camp followers spread venereal disease; and always Confederate defenders waited up ahead, exacting a heavy toll on the advancing Northerners. These events and details, conveyed with all the force of Ferguson's fine intellect and superior powers of observation, offer an unforgettable firsthand view of the savage contest that broke the southern populace's will to fight on.Janet Correll Ellison is English as a Second Language Coordinator for the Executive MBA Program at Quincy University in Quincy, Illinois. Mark A. Weitz is an assistant professor of history at Arizona State University and the author of A Higher Duty: Desertion among Georgia Troops during the Civil War (Nebraska 2000).
Main Description
Historians have shown us the drama and sweep of the swathe Sherman's March cut through the South. Officers have bequeathed us accounts of what happened in strategic and practical terms. But for a gritty, day-by-day, on-the-ground view of what the march to Atlanta meant to the common soldier, nothing can compare to the diary of an enlisted man like John Hill Ferguson. A Scottish immigrant and a U.S. citizen since 1856, Ferguson enlisted in the Illinois Veteran Volunteers in 1860 and shortly afterward began to keep a diary. The annotated entries presented here, from 1864 and 1865, describe life in the Tenth Illinois as the troops made their way through the Carolinas and Georgia under Sherman. In these pages the details of Civil War soldiering become real, immediate, and personal, as do the daily dramas of life on the march. Smallpox struck Ferguson's unit early on, decimating his company; food, when there was any, was invariably poor; and always Confederate defenders waited up ahead, exacting a heavy toll on the advancing Northerners. These events and details, conveyed with all the force of Ferguson's fine intellect and superior powers of observation, offer an unforgettable firsthand view of that savage contest.
Main Description
Historians have shown us the drama and sweep of the swathe Sherman's March cut through the South. Officers have bequeathed us accounts of what happened in strategic and practical terms. But for a gritty, day-by-day, on-the-ground view of what the march to Atlanta meant to the common soldier, nothing can compare to the diary of an enlisted man like John Hill Ferguson. A Scottish immigrant and a U.S. citizen since 1856, Ferguson enlisted in the Illinois Veteran Volunteers in 1860 and shortly afterward began to keep a diary. The annotated entries presented here, from 1864 and 1865, describe life in the Tenth Illinois as the troops made their way through the Carolinas and Georgia under Sherman. In these pages the details of Civil War soldiering become real, immediate, and personal, as do the daily dramas of life on the march. Smallpox struck Ferguson's unit early on, decimating his company; food, when there was any, was invariably po∨ and always Confederate defenders waited up ahead, exacting a heavy toll on the advancing Northerners. These events and details, conveyed with all the force of Ferguson's fine intellect and superior powers of observation, offer an unforgettable firsthand view of that savage contest.
Unpaid Annotation
For a gritty, day-by-day, on-the-ground view of what the march to Atlanta meant to the common soldier, nothing can compare to the diary of an enlisted man like John Hill Ferguson. A Scottish immigrant and a U.S. citizen since 1856, Ferguson enlisted in the Illinois Veteran Volunteers in 1860. His diary of events and details offers an unforgettable firsthand view of the savage contest.
Main Description
Historians have shown us the drama and sweep of the swathe Sherman's March cut through the South. Officers have bequeathed us accounts of what happened in strategic and practical terms. But for a gritty, day-by-day, on-the-ground view of what the march to Atlanta meant to the common soldier, nothing can compare to the diary of an enlisted man like John Hill Ferguson. A Scottish immigrant and a U.S. citizen since 1856, Ferguson enlisted in the Illinois Veteran Volunteers in 1860 and shortly afterward began to keep a diary. The annotated entries presented here, from 1864 and 1865, describe life in the Tenth Illinois as the troops made their way through the Carolinas and Georgia under Sherman. In these pages the details of Civil War soldiering become real, immediate, and personal, as do the daily dramas of life on the march. Smallpox struck Ferguson's unit early on, decimating his company; food, when there was any, was invariably po and always Confederate defenders waited up ahead, exacting a heavy toll on the advancing Northerners. These events and details, conveyed with all the force of Ferguson's fine intellect and superior powers of observation, offer an unforgettable firsthand view of that savage contest.
Bowker Data Service Summary
A Scottish immigrant and a US citizen since 1856, John Hill Ferguson enlisted in the Illinois Veteran Volunteers in 1860. These annotated entries from his diary in 1864 and 1865 describe life as the troops made their way through Georgia.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. xiii
Chronologyp. xxv
Diary IV: 1 January to 13 September 1864p. 1
Diary V: 1 January to 10 June 1865p. 93
Notes for Diary IVp. 139
Notes for Diary Vp. 148
Bibliographyp. 153
Indexp. 157
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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