Catalogue


1590s drama and militarism : portrayals of war in Marlowe, Chapman and Shakespeare's Henry V /
Nina Taunton.
imprint
Aldershot : Ashgate, 2001.
description
vii, 239 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0754602745
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot : Ashgate, 2001.
isbn
0754602745
catalogue key
4626818
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Nina Taunton is a lecturer in English at Brunel University.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
1590s Drama and Militarism is a fascinating interdisciplinary study of various textual interventions into the military realities of the late Elizabethan period. Its major strength is its insistence on the discursive nature of militarism, and the author convincingly uses literary and non-literary texts, including manuals and contemporary military correspondence, to reconstruct the particular anxieties which surrounded the military exigencies of the 1590s. In this study Nina Taunton makes appropriate (and critically inflected) use of Foucault's theories of surveillance and Lefebvre's theories about the ideological production of social space. She puts Michel de Certeau's theories of social practice to good use in her analysis of military strategy. These theoretical perspectives are usefully combined with highly specific and well-documented historical analyses.
Long Description
1590s Drama and Militarism is a fascinating interdisciplinary study of various textual interventions into the military realities of the late Elizabethan period. Its major strength is its insistence on the discursive nature of militarism, and the author convincingly uses literary and non-literary texts-including manuals and contemporary military correspondence-to reconstruct the particular anxieties which surrounded the military exigencies of the 1590s, a particularly fraught and unstable period of the aging queen's reign.The literature of the 'art of war' has been little studied by literary scholars, despite their richly rhetorical nature. Dr Taunton's analysis thus brings to light a neglected but culturally significant form of Renaissance textuality. In doing so she is able to shed new light on the Renaissance drama, which she shows to have responded sensitively (and sometimes critically) to these textual constructions of actual warfare, and problematised the anxious idealisations of the military manuals.The particular readings of plays here are richly rewarding for the scholar of Renaissance drama-the significance of Henry's nocturnal surveillance of his own camp on the eve of the battle of Agincourt, for example, benefits immeasurably from being contextualised in the light of contemporary theories of encampment. The role of the women in Tamburlaine's camp in Marlowe's plays is also given particular significance when viewed in the light of the contemporary proscriptions regarding the presence of women in camps during the military campaigns in the Low Countries.In this study Dr Taunton makes appropriate (and critically inflected) use of Foucault's theories of surveillance, Lefebvre's theories about the ideological production of social space, and Michel de Certeau's theories of social practice are put to good use in her analysis of military strategy. These theoretical perspectives are usefully combined with highly specific and well-documented historical analyses.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. vi
Acknowledgementsp. vii
Introduction: The brazen throat of warp. 1
Generals
The real and the ideal: Sutcliffe, Essexp. 23
Alternative model: Northumberlandp. 36
Marlowe's Tamburlainep. 58
Shakespeare's Henry Vp. 62
Commanders in action: Henri IV of France, the Birons and Roger Williams; the siege of Rouenp. 69
Chapman's Byronp. 79
Stratagems of war
Strategyp. 93
Tacticsp. 111
Numbersp. 125
Arms and the manp. 132
Rhetoricp. 146
Camps
Watchfulness: Henry Vp. 159
Locations: Caesar and Pompeyp. 183
Forbidden presences: the women in the Tamburlaine playsp. 202
Codap. 219
Bibliographyp. 223
Indexp. 233
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem