Catalogue


Frontier blood : the saga of the Parker family /
Jo Ella Powell Exley.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
College Station : Texas A & M University Press, c2001.
description
xiii, 331 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
1585441368 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
College Station : Texas A & M University Press, c2001.
isbn
1585441368 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4624870
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jo Ella Powell Exley is an independent writer who is the compiler of Texas Tears, Texas Sunshine: Voices of Frontier Women, which has become a modern classic. She lives with her husband and daughter in Katy, Texas
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Spur Awards, USA, 2002 : Nominated
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2001-10-22:
Captivity diaries, those often brutal accounts of settlers taken prisoner by American Indians, might be considered a genre in their own right. Drawing heavily on such first-person testimonies, Exley (editor of Texas Tears, Texas Sunshine: Voices of Frontier Women) traces the Parker family's trajectory, from Elder John (born in 1758) to his great-grandson Quanah Parker, a Comanche war chief. This family had a particular impact on the development of Texas and the West and was especially determined to make a life there, despite the likelihood of violence. Rachel Parker, captured in 1836 by raiding Comanches and brutally tortured along with her young son, is eventually rescued. Nine-year-old Cynthia Ann, also kidnapped, makes a life among the Comanches and bears Quanah and two other children. After 24 years, Cynthia Ann is returned to her white family but never adjusts. The rest of the book tells the story of Quanah, who ultimately negotiates peace with the white settlers. His speech (in English) at his mother's graveside underlines the changed attitude of the former war chief: "Forty years ago my mother died. She captured by Comanches.... Love Indian and wild life so well no want to go back to white folks.... I love my mother. I like white people. Got great heart. I want my people follow after white way, get educate, know work, make living when payments stop." Vivid, unsparing accounts, much insight into the pioneer experience and the details of early interracial relations will make this book popular among devotees of the history of the American West. 12 b&w photos. (Nov. 26) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Choice on 2002-06-01:
Cynthia Ann Parker is perhaps the best known and most written about Anglo American captured by Native Americans in Western history. Her family founded Fort Parker in central Texas in the 1830s. On May 19, 1836, a war party of Comanches raided the fort, killing many of its inhabitants. They took as captive young Cynthia and her brother John, who lived with the tribe for years. Brother John eventually returned to live among the Anglo Texans, while Cynthia married Chief Peta Nacona and became completely acculturated. Her son, Quanah Parker, served as the last chief of the Comanches, passing away at his home on the Fort Still Reservation in 1911. This splendid and well-researched volume analyzes three generations of the Parker family, starting with Cynthia's parents, telling her life story, and culminating with an examination of Quanah's career. Based on a solid array of primary and secondary sources, the study presents a well-balanced view of 19th-century Texas frontier life that sets each of its historical subjects fully within the context of their times. It should long remain the standard history of Cynthia Ann Parker and her family. General and undergraduate collections. L. T. Cummins Austin College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, October 2001
Choice, June 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
The descendants of Elder John Parker were a strange and often brilliant family who may have changed the course of Texas and Western history. Their obsession with religion and their desire for land took them from Virginia to Georgia, Tennessee, Illinois, and finally Texas. From their midst came Cynthia Ann, taken captive by Comanches as a young girl and recaptured as an adult to live in grief among her birth family until she died. From their line too came her son, Quanah Parker, last of the great Comanche war chiefs -- and first of their great peace leaders.Although the broad outlines of the stories of Cynthia Ann and Quanah are familiar, Jo Ella Powell Exley adds a new dimension by placing them in the context of the stubborn, strong, contentious Parker clan, who lived near and dealt with restive Indians across successive frontiers until history finally brought them to Texas, where their fate changed. Drawing on a wealth of contemporary accounts, including several first-person stories, Exley follows Cynthia Ann through her life in the Indian camp and eventually her recapture by her birth family. She also tells the dramatic story of Quanah Parker through childhood, battle, surrender, and reservation life.This narrative is filled with authentic flavor and sets straight a story that has sometimes been distorted. It offers new insight if not a definitive interpretation of Cynthia Ann Parker's last years, providing a more complex picture of the "white" years of a woman who had matured among the Comanches since the age of nine.Among the documents from which Exley draws are a short autobiography of Daniel Parker, Rachel Parker Plummer's two narratives of her Indian captivity, JamesParker's account of his search for Rachel and the other captives, and several autobiographical accounts Quanah dictated to his friends.Exley tells a compelling story and gives rich character insights into the extended Parker
Publisher Fact Sheet
The descendants of Elder John Parker were a strange & often brilliant family who may have changed the course of Texas & Western history. Their obsession with religion & their desire for land took them from Virginia to Georgia, Tennessee, Illinois, & finally Texas. From their midst came Cynthia Ann, taken captive by Comanches as a young girl & recaptured as an adult to live in grief among her birth family until she died. From their line too came her son, Quanah Parker, last of the great Comanche war chiefs--and first of their great peace leaders. Although the broad outlines of the stories of Cynthia Ann & Quanah are familiar, Jo Ella Powell Exley adds a new dimension by placing them in the context of the stubborn, strong, contentious Parker clan, who lived near & dealt with restive Indians across successive frontiers until history finally brought them to Texas, where their fate changed. Drawing on a wealth of contemporary accounts, including several first-person stories, Exley follows Cynthia Ann through her life in the Indian camp & eventually her recapture by her birth family. She also tells the dramatic story of Quanah Parker through childhood, battle, surrender, & reservation life. This narrative is filled with authentic flavor & sets straight a story that has sometimes been distorted. It offers new insight if not a definitive interpretation of Cynthia Ann Parker's last years, providing a more complex picture of the "white" years of a woman who had matured among the Comanches since the age of nine. Among the documents from which Exley draws are a short autobiography of Daniel Parker, Rachel Parker Plummer's two narratives of her Indian captivity, James Parker's account of his search for Rachel & the other captives, & several autobiographical accounts Quanah dictated to his friends. Exley tells a compelling story & gives rich character insights into the extended Parker family. But she also does more: she gives a feeling of what it was really like to live on the frontier in the eighteenth & nineteenth centuries.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. IX
Prefacep. XI
Daniel
A Poor Sinnerp. 3
The Wrong Roadp. 11
Plain and Unpolished--The Diamond in the Rough Statep. 24
Rachel
Father, Forgive Themp. 41
Vengeance Is Minep. 61
How Checkered Are the Ways of Providencep. 82
James W.
The Tongue of Slanderp. 97
The House of Godp. 106
Sundry Chargesp. 113
Called Homep. 122
Cynthia Ann
Miss Parkerp. 133
The Hand of Savage Invasionp. 144
The Long-Lost Relativep. 165
Thirsting for Gloryp. 183
It Was Quanahp. 202
So Many Soldiersp. 219
Blood upon the Landp. 231
I Lived Freep. 252
Notesp. 265
Bibliographyp. 303
Indexp. 323
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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