Catalogue


Bazaar to piazza : Islamic trade and Italian art, 1300-1600 /
Rosamond E. Mack.
imprint
Berkeley ; London : University of California Press, c2002.
description
ix, 257 p. : ill. (some col.), col. map ; 29 cm.
ISBN
0520221311 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley ; London : University of California Press, c2002.
isbn
0520221311 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4623004
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 227-240) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This is a book for which there is no published counterpart, and it is likely to have considerable appeal to students, collectors, and museum curators working on European or Islamic decorative arts. There have been many articles on the subjects covered by this book, but no attempt to pull so much diverse material together into a single publication."--Julian Raby, author of Venice, Dürer, and the Oriental Mode "Mack's imaginatively researched and lively text explores the acquisition and interpretation of Islamic works of art in Renaissance Italy, in media such as ceramics, glass, and textiles. The book's emphasis is strongly visual; it is richly illustrated with objects of stunning design and workmanship from an impressive range of museum collections. The book will serve as a source of enduring value for the specialist, just as it will delight the avid museum-goer."--Deborah Howard, author of Venice and the East: The Impact of the Islamic World on Venetian Architecture 1100-1500 "Mack's survey of luxury objects and techniques in the late Middle Ages and especially during the Renaissance is excellently researched, well written, learned and interesting at the same time. . . . The scholarship is superior, in fact quite amazing, if one considers the variety of topics involved, the illustrations plentiful but essential."--Oleg Grabar, author of The Shape of the Holy: Early Islamic Jerusalem "This manuscript traces the influence of oriental motifs, imagery and craftsmanship on Italian artists and craftsmen, offering a valuable overview of a series of complex cultural and aesthetic interchanges. I found the discussion illuminating, a fascinating read on the whole."--Patricia Fortini Brown, author of Venice and Antiquity: The Venetian Sense of the Past
Flap Copy
"This is a book for which there is no published counterpart, and it is likely to have considerable appeal to students, collectors, and museum curators working on European or Islamic decorative arts. There have been many articles on the subjects covered by this book, but no attempt to pull so much diverse material together into a single publication."--Julian Raby, author ofVenice, DÜrer, and the Oriental Mode "Mack's imaginatively researched and lively text explores the acquisition and interpretation of Islamic works of art in Renaissance Italy, in media such as ceramics, glass, and textiles. The book's emphasis is strongly visual; it is richly illustrated with objects of stunning design and workmanship from an impressive range of museum collections. The book will serve as a source of enduring value for the specialist, just as it will delight the avid museum-goer."--Deborah Howard, author ofVenice and the East: The Impact of the Islamic World on Venetian Architecture 1100-1500 "Mack's survey of luxury objects and techniques in the late Middle Ages and especially during the Renaissance is excellently researched, well written, learned and interesting at the same time. . . . The scholarship is superior, in fact quite amazing, if one considers the variety of topics involved, the illustrations plentiful but essential."--Oleg Grabar, author ofThe Shape of the Holy: Early Islamic Jerusalem "This manuscript traces the influence of oriental motifs, imagery and craftsmanship on Italian artists and craftsmen, offering a valuable overview of a series of complex cultural and aesthetic interchanges. I found the discussion illuminating, a fascinating read on the whole."--Patricia Fortini Brown, author ofVenice and Antiquity: The Venetian Sense of the Past
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-06-01:
Everyone who looks at Italian art has wanted this very book for years; unfortunately, it is now also a timely book. Silks, rugs, oriental scripts and pseudo-scripts, ceramics, glass, and bookbinding seen in works of art from Giotto through Lotto suggest Near Eastern sources. The author, the wife of a diplomat with a thesis from Harvard on Girolamo Muziano (not even mentioned in the book), has sought out superb examples and comparisons, nicely illustrated, and has set their consideration in the context of trade. The result is a specialized, at times detailed, study that manages to be generally interesting from beginning to end. Ideological implications are also weighed, though usually cross-cultural misapprehension seems to be at the bottom of borrowings. Like a balm after generations of overemphasis on the classical sources of Renaissance art, this study both answers long-standing queries and makes readers that much more curious about these and related topics---all this without a hint of tiresome polemic and in good scholarly (but never dull) form. General readers; lower-division undergraduates through professionals. P. Emison University of New Hampshire
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2002
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Summaries
Main Description
This manuscript looks at how trade with the Near and Far East influenced the decorative arts in Italy during three centuries.
Long Description
The Mediterranean trade in luxury goods from the East made a strong and lasting impression on Italian artistic taste and production during the early Renaissance. This opulently illustrated book describes and illustrates the fascinating ways that imported art objects inspired improvements and new variety in Italian decorative arts. From Italian textiles featuring Islamic and Asian motifs to ceramics and glassware that reflected Syrian techniques and ornamental concepts, this book gives an extraordinary view of the influence of imported Oriental goods in Italy over three crucial centuries of artistic development. Rosamond Mack traces Italy's emerging decorative arts tradition as she discusses textiles, ceramics, glass, bookbinding, and metalwork; she also considers how Italian painting reflects trans-Mediterranean trade and travel. Painters represented carpets and ceramics from the East in their works, as well as textiles with bands of writing replicating or suggesting Arabic script, negotiating cultural differences in their borrowings. These paintings show how Islamic motifs were absorbed into Christian contexts. Beginning in the 1300s and 1400s, the works of Italian craftsmen inspired by luxury goods from Islamic and Asian countries gradually began to compete with those brought to Europe in huge quantities on Italian merchant ships. Yet even after their own versions surpassed the quality of some of the imported goods, Italians continued to collect, imitate, and adapt objects from the Ottoman empire and China. As Mack discusses these important influences, she provides useful summaries of the history of Renaissance decorative arts and presents a balanced and carefully researched view of the controversial topic of East-West artistic exchange. This uniquely comprehensive study offers an intriguing look at the effects of exchange in Renaissance material culture, shedding new light on the development of the Italian Renaissance as a whole. No other source provides so rich and inclusive a synthesis of the period's decorative arts.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work describes and illustrates the ways that imported art objects inspired improvements and variety in Italian decorative arts. It looks at the influence of imported Oriental goods in Italy over three centuries of artistic development.
Table of Contents
Preface and Acknowledgments
Introduction
Trade, Travel and Diplomacy
Patterned Silks
Oriental Script in Italian Paintings
Carpets
Ceramics
Glass
Bookbinding and Lacquer
Inlaid Brass
The Pictorial Arts
From Bazaar to Piazza and Back
Notes
Glossary
Bibliography
Picture Credits
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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