Catalogue


The integrated behavioral health continuum : theory and practice /
edited by Laurel J. Kiser, Paul M. Lefkovitz, Lawrence L. Kennedy.
imprint
Washington, DC : American Psychiatric Pub., c2001.
description
xii, 321 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0880489456 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Washington, DC : American Psychiatric Pub., c2001.
isbn
0880489456 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4621404
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Melissa E. Abraham, M.S. Research Fellow, Mental Health Services and Policy Program, Institute of Health Services Research and Policy Studies, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois Joan Betzold, M.Ed., A.B.Q.A.U.R.P., A.B.R.M. President, Professional Services Consultants, Inc., Bel Air, Maryland Allen S. Daniels, Ed.D. Professor, Department of Clinical Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine; and Chief Executive Officer, Alliance Behavioral Care, Cincinnati, Ohio Susan L. Ettner, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research, University of California-Los Angeles, California Joanne Forbes, R.N., M.S. Director of Program Development, South Beach Psychiatric Center, Staten Island, New York Trevor Hadley, Ph.D. Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Eunice Hartman, R.N., M.S., C.S., C.N.A.A. President and Chief Executive Officer, Hartman and Associates, Inc., Boston, Massachusetts Michael A. Hoge, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Psychology (in Psychiatry) and Director, Managed Behavioral Health Care, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut Edna Kamis-Gould, Ph.D. Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Lawrence L. Kennedy, M.D. Former Director, Partial Hospitalization Services, Menninger Memorial Hospital, Topeka; private practice, Topeka; and Training and Supervising Analyst, Greater Kansas City Psychoanalytic Institute, Leewood, Kansas Laurel J. Kiser, Ph.D., M.B.A. Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Center for Mental Health Services Research, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore Edward L. Knight, Ph.D. Consultant, ValueOptions, Colorado Springs, Colorado Paul M. Lefkovitz, Ph.D. Executive Director, St. Vincent Stress Centers, St. Vincent Hospital; and Clinical Associate Professor of Psychology (Psychiatry), Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis John S. Lyons, Ph.D. Director, Mental Health Services and Policy Program, Institute of Health Services Research and Policy Studies, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois Margaret Moran, R.N., M.H.S.A. Principal, Moran and Associates, Wilmington, Massachusetts David E. Ness, M.D. Medical Director, Psychiatry Service, Mercy Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Ike Powell Director of Training, Mental Health Empowerment Project, Albany, New York Andres J. Pumariega, M.D. Professor and Director, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, James H. Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City David F. Raney, M.D. GCS Group, Inc., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Mark S. Salzer, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Karl W. Stukenberg, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Xavier University, Cincinnati, Ohio Mark Tidgewell, C.P.A. President, Tidgewell Associates, Columbia, Maryland Anthony M. Trachta, M.S.W. Principal, Atrium Management Team Consultants, Boston, Massachusetts
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This book provides the rationale and recipe for the development of a continuum of quality care for the new millennium. Overcoming fragmented, uncoordinated treatment, and episodic treatment is a high priority for patients, family members, clinicians, and especially policy-makers who are concerned about affluent and effective distribution of scarce resources. This book will be a required text for the next generation of behavioral health care-givers. We are challenged by the authors to do a better job in caring for individual patients and families in the complex medical marketplace."- Steven S. Sharfstein, M.D., President and Chief Executive Officer, Sheppard Pratt Health System; Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, University of Maryland
"This book is the next step in the discussion of clinical delivery systems-rich in theory and practical contributions, including charts, tables, and tool boxes."- Robert K. Schreter, M.D.
This item was reviewed in:
Doody's Reviews, March 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Until recently, behavioral health was defined within the strict dichotomy of inpatient and outpatient care-a dichotomy that failed to mirror the range and complexity of human experience and clinical needs. Today's integrated system renders this dichotomy obsolete. Instead, service delivery integration processes offer an organized system of care rooted in a common vision and defined by processes intended to promote continuity and quality of care, coordination of efforts, efficiencies of operation, and seamless patient movement through an otherwise bewildering array of health care services. Unique in the literature, this volume brings together distinguished clinicians and policymakers who focus on the operational aspects of developing state-of-the-art integrated delivery systems. History and concept -Why we need integrated health care delivery systems, including a model of service delivery integration that incorporates current barriers (e.g., ambiguous roles and responsibilities and lack of strategic alignment; how to design integrated delivery systems improving clinical outcomes, achieving fiscal and operating efficiencies, and aligning clinical and fiscal incentives) Structural foundations -Access to the system of care for patients, payors, and employers; how to design level-of-care criteria; eight strategies that help clients move along the continuum; how to define level of care in today's managed care world; and the process of following therapeutic processes (i.e., philosophies, procedures, and practices used to create or support recovery and wellness) across the continuum Administrative and management processes -How to reorient staff toward minimizing barriers and making the patient central to the system; documentation/information management and reimbursement (rates and rate structures, risk assumption); current research and its enormous potential to improve every aspect of care; quality assessments based on examining the driving forces behind the needs for monitoring and evaluating quality and outcomes; and the relation of behavioral health care systems, which seek to fully integrate clients and families into the fabric of their community and culture, to other systems A case vignette that highlights-from the consumer's viewpoint-the vital role of self-help during an episode of hospitalization and a discussion of future directions in integrated behavioral health care round out this remarkable volume. With its wealth of strategic and "nuts and bolts" information-useful for alliances and single entities alike-on how to harness operational forces in establishing an effective integrated behavioral health continuum, this volume will be welcomed by those who deliver direct services (psychiatric professionals) and those who administer and manage the integrated financing and delivery of quality care from public (U.S. government agencies) and private (managed care and insurance providers) sectors alike.
Main Description
Until recently, behavioral health was defined within the strict dichotomy of inpatient and outpatient care -- a dichotomy that failed to mirror the range and complexity of human experience and clinical needs. Today's integrated system renders this dichotomy obsolete. Instead, service delivery integration processes offer an organized system of care rooted in a common vision and defined by processes intended to promote continuity and quality of care, coordination of efforts, efficiencies of operation, and seamless patient movement through an otherwise bewildering array of health care services. Unique in the literature, this volume brings together distinguished clinicians and policymakers who focus on the operational aspects of developing state-of-the-art integrated delivery systems. History and concept -- Why we need integrated health care delivery systems, including a model of service delivery integration that incorporates current barriers (e.g., ambiguous roles and responsibilities and lack of strategic alignment; how to design integrated delivery systems improving clinical outcomes, achieving fiscal and operating efficiencies, and aligning clinical and fiscal incentives) Structural foundations -- Access to the system of care for patients, payors, and employers; how to design level-of-care criteria; eight strategies that help clients move along the continuum; how to define level of care in today's managed care world; and the process of following therapeutic processes (i.e., philosophies, procedures, and practices used to create or support recovery and wellness) across the continuum Administrative and management processes -- How to reorient staff toward minimizing barriers and making the patient central to the system; documentation/information management and reimbursement (rates and rate structures, risk assumption); current research and its enormous potential to improve every aspect of care; quality assessments based on examining the driving forces behind the needs for monitoring and evaluating quality and outcomes; and the relation of behavioral health care systems, which seek to fully integrate clients and families into the fabric of their community and culture, to other systems A case vignette that highlights -- from the consumer's viewpoint -- the vital role of self-help during an episode of hospitalization and a discussion of future directions in integrated behavioral health care round out this remarkable volume. With its wealth of strategic and "nuts and bolts" information -- useful for alliances and single entities alike -- on how to harness operational forces in establishing an effective integrated behavioral health continuum, this volume will be welcomed by those who deliver direct services (psychiatric professionals) and those who administer and manage the integrated financing and delivery of quality care from public (U.S. government agencies) and private (managed care and insurance providers) sectors alike.
Main Description
This practical volume brings together distinguished clinicians and policymakers who focus on the operational aspects of developing state-of-the-art integrated delivery systems, from concept and structural foundations to critical administrative and management structures.
Table of Contents
Contributorsp. vii
Prefacep. xi
Toward Integrationp. 1
A Model of Service Delivery Integrationp. 17
Barriers to Service Delivery Integrationp. 41
Design of Integrated Delivery Systemsp. 55
Access to the System of Carep. 69
Designing Level of Care Criteriap. 91
Movement Along the Continuum of Carep. 109
Levels of Carep. 123
Therapeutic Processes Across the Continuump. 143
Staffing Across the Continuum of Carep. 173
Documentation Managementp. 191
Reimbursement: Rates and Rate Structuresp. 205
Reimbursement: Assuming Riskp. 221
Current Research on Mental Health Systems Integrationp. 235
Assessing Quality of Carep. 257
A Consumer View of an Episode of Care and How Self-Help Helpsp. 269
Behavioral Health Care Systems Relating to Other Systemsp. 281
Epilogue: The Future of Integrated Behavioral Health Carep. 301
Indexp. 307
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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