Catalogue


Democracy and human rights in Latin America /
edited by Richard S. Hillman, John A. Peeler, and Elsa Cardozo da Silva.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2002.
description
viii, 228 p.
ISBN
0275974820 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2002.
isbn
0275974820 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4621368
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Louis N. Bickford, Associate Director, Global Studies Program, University of Wisconsin, Madison Elsa Cardozo Da Silva, Professor of International Relations and Associate Director of the Institute for the Study of Democracy and Human Rights, Central University of Venezuela Edward Drachman, Professor of Political Science, State University of New York, Geneseo Richard S. Hillman, Professor of Political Science and Director, Institute for the Study of Democracy and Human Rights, St. John Fisher College/Central University of Venezuela John A. Peeler, Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science, Bucknell University Isabel Ribeiro de Oliveira, Professor of Political Science, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Maria Teresa Romero, Professor of International Relations, Central University of Venezuela Christopher Sabatini, Director, Latin America and the Caribbean, National Endowment for Democracy, Washington, D.C. Irwin P. Stotzky, Professor of Law and Director, Center for the Study of Human Rights, University of Miami School of Law
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-08-01:
This important work examines the obstacles confronting Latin American countries in pursuing the goals of democracy and human rights, with a focus on Chile, Venezuela, Colombia, Brazil, Haiti, Cuba, and US policy toward Latin America. The writers in this edited collection note that the military is no longer the main threat to democratic government, replaced today by weak economies, corruption, crime, voter apathy, and the ever-widening gap between the rich and poor. When the masses see democratic government as a facade for rule by a privileged elite, they are ready to accept autocratic leaders who appear capable of solving socioeconomic problems. In their focus on US policy toward Latin America and the collective security apparatus of the Organization of American States, the writers--who are collectively committed to the promotion of democracy and human rights--bemoan the timidness in addressing the undermining of democracy and human rights under democratically elected governments. In the unique example of Cuba and the Castro regime, the suggestion is to end the US trade embargo and to convince private business to attach human rights conditions to investment in Cuba. Recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above. S. L. Rozman Tougaloo College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This important work examines the obstacles confronting Latin American countries in pursuing the goals of democracy and human rights, with a focus on Chile, Venezuela, Colombia, Brazil, Haiti, Cuba, and US policy toward Latin America. The writers in this edited collection note that the military is no longer the main threat to democratic government, replaced today by weak economies, corruption, crime, voter apathy, and the ever-widening gap between the rich and poor. When the masses see democratic government as a facade for rule by a privileged elite, they are ready to accept autocratic leaders who appear capable of solving socioeconomic problems. In their focus on US policy toward Latin America and the collective security apparatus of the Organization of American States, the writers--who are collectively committed to the promotion of democracy and human rights--bemoan the timidness in addressing the undermining of democracy and human rights under democratically elected governments. In the unique example of Cuba and the Castro regime, the suggestion is to end the US trade embargo and to convince private business to attach human rights conditions to investment in Cuba. Recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above."- CHOICE
'œThis important work examines the obstacles confronting Latin American countries in pursuing the goals of democracy and human rights, with a focus on Chile, Venezuela, Colombia, Brazil, Haiti, Cuba, and US policy toward Latin America. The writers in this edited collection note that the military is no longer the main threat to democratic government, replaced today by weak economies, corruption, crime, voter apathy, and the ever-widening gap between the rich and poor. When the masses see democratic government as a facade for rule by a privileged elite, they are ready to accept autocratic leaders who appear capable of solving socioeconomic problems. In their focus on US policy toward Latin America and the collective security apparatus of the Organization of American States, the writers--who are collectively committed to the promotion of democracy and human rights--bemoan the timidness in addressing the undermining of democracy and human rights under democratically elected governments. In the unique example of Cuba and the Castro regime, the suggestion is to end the US trade embargo and to convince private business to attach human rights conditions to investment in Cuba. Recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above.'' CHOICE
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Choice, August 2002
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Summaries
Long Description
Questions about democracy and human rights have emerged in the advent of the 21st century, a time in which the prospects for progress in these areas have never been greater. This book is designed to respond to some of these questions with reference to Latin America, where democratic regimes have alternated with authoritarian governments and the human rights record is inconsistent at best. Taken together, these essays reveal the complexity of democratic transitions, the importance of support for human rights, and the way in which democracy and human rights are linked in Latin America. The first part of the book includes chapters that cast a critical eye on democracy and human rights trends in Chile, Venezuela, Columbia, and Brazil. Part two gauges the impact and prospects of foreign initiatives promoting democracy and human rights in the region, focusing especially on those efforts made by the United States in Haiti and Cuba. Each chapter reaffirms the essential linkages between procedural democracy and substantive human rights, and argues that states with authoritarian pasts must reorient their political cultures, and that these initiatives must come from both domestic and international agents. Students and scholars interested in the problems and prospects inherent in democratic transitions in contemporary Latin America will find this collection enlightening.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Introductionp. 1
Critical Perspectives on Democracy and Human Rights
Preserving Memory: The Past and the Human Rights Movement in Chilep. 9
Venezuela and Colombia: Governability as the Social Construction of Democracyp. 31
Citizenship and Human Rights Policy in Brazilp. 55
The United States and the International Promotion of Democracy
Plowing the Sea? International Defense of Democracy in the Age of Illiberal Democracyp. 77
U.S. Policy for the Promotion of Democracy: The Venezuelan Casep. 103
Democracy and International Military Intervention: The Case of Haitip. 125
Rethinking U.S. Policy toward Fidel Castro: Can Implementation of Best Business Practices Better Promote Political and Economic Liberalization in Cuba?p. 179
Conclusionp. 215
Indexp. 221
About the Editors and Contributorsp. 227
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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