Catalogue


Tearing down the streets : adventures in urban anarchy /
Jeff Ferrell.
imprint
New York : Palgrave, 2001.
description
282 p. : ill.
ISBN
0312233353
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave, 2001.
isbn
0312233353
catalogue key
4618258
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jeff Ferrell is Professor of Criminal Justice at Northern Arizona University. He is the author of Crimes of Style: Urban Graffiti and the Politics of Criminality, and coeditor of three books: Cultural Criminology, Ethnography at the Edge, and Making Trouble. Jeff Ferrell is the recipient of the 1998 Critical Criminologist of the Year Award, presented by the American Society of Criminology. He lives in Ft. Worth, Texas
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2001-11-12:
"If I can't dance, it's not my revolution," anarchist Emma Goldman is said to have declared, bringing together the ideals of freedom and pleasure, and her sentiments are echoed by a new wave of grassroots political activism aimed at making streets safe, cities more livable and the environment healthier. This in-depth, wittily written analysis of take-back-the-city activists ranges from graffiti artists who target the "Disnification" of New York City with images of a decapitated Mickey Mouse and the words "Just Say No" to the radical anti-automotive bike group Critical Mass (whose motto is "We Don't Block Traffic. We Are Traffic"), to San Francisco Liberation Radio, which struggles to "free" the air waves. Interweaving political analysis, social history and a semi-gonzo-pop journalism, Ferrell, professor of criminal justice at Northern Arizona University, writes of his own adventures as a graffiti artist, street entertainer and political bicyclist, but places his political commitments in a broad historical and cultural framework that includes discussions of the direct action strategies of the Wobblies, the cultural importance of the 1871 Paris Commune and the political impact of the Sex Pistols, British punk culture and homeless activism. Balancing theory with descriptions and evaluations of actual events New York mayor Giuliani's battle against the nonprofit Housing Works; city campaigns against political Native American graffiti in Denver he provides an energetic and highly informed look at environmental and political movements to nonviolently "reclaim the streets." (Dec.) Forecast: While the movements trying to influence the shape of globalization have been overshadowed by recent events, Ferrell's account of nonviolent activism reveals a humanist core that can be respected regardless of ideology. Readers looking for evidence of what civil liberty means should look no further. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Choice on 2002-10-01:
Occasional street musician and professor Ferrell (criminal justice, Northern Arizona Univ.) has written an interesting book largely as an insider, focusing on how the public spaces inhabited by such Bohemian types as street musicians, artists, gangbangers, magicians, gutter punks, and the homeless in US and many Westernized cities throughout the world are continually being taken away by corporations and self-righteous moral entrepreneurs. Ferrell seems concerned mainly with unconventional people because throughout the many histories of most cities, these Bohemian types not only have had a right to exist, but equally important, have added spontaneity, heterogeneity, and versatility to urban life. Ferrell argues that public space for those practicing such Bohemian lifestyles is continually eroded by social and legal controls such as loitering laws, strict licensing policies and practices, and police harassment supported by city governments bent on "beautifying the city" campaigns. Strongly recommended for anyone interested in cities and city life. A complementary book is Mitchell Duneier's Sidewalk (1999), which masterfully describes the trials and tribulations of how poor black men live from day to day, making their living on the sidewalks of Greenwich Village by selling secondhand goods, panhandling, and scavenging used books and magazines. P. J. Venturelli Valparaiso University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...provides and energetic and highly informed look at environmental and political movements to nonviolently 'reclaim the streets.'" Publishers Weekly "...those who have felt themselves being smothered for the sake of an artificial community will find it difficult not to share his sympathies..." Booklist Strongly recommended for anyone interested in cities and city life. -Choice "His firsthand field experience and passion add insight to his discussion of the daily lives of these groups and give his personal accounts excitement and interest."--Mindy S. Wilson, Contemporary Sociology
"...provides and energetic and highly informed look at environmental and political movements to nonviolently 'reclaim the streets.'" Publishers Weekly "...those who have felt themselves being smothered for the sake of an artificial community will find it difficult not to share his sympathies..." Booklist Strongly recommended for anyone interested in cities and city life. -Choice "His firsthand field experience and passion add insight to his discussion of the daily lives of these groups and give his personal accounts excitement and interest."--Mindy S. Wilson,Contemporary Sociology
"...provides and energetic and highly informed look at environmental and political movements to nonviolently 'reclaim the streets.'" Publishers Weekly "...those who have felt themselves being smothered for the sake of an artificial community will find it difficult not to share his sympathies..." Booklist "His firsthand field experience and passion add insight to his discussion of the daily lives of these groups and give his personal accounts excitement and interest."--Mindy S. Wilson, Contemporary Sociology
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews, October 2001
Publishers Weekly, November 2001
Booklist, December 2001
Choice, October 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Publisher Fact Sheet
This book is a revealing analysis of the new urban politics that explores the day-to-day skirmishes in the struggle over public life & public space.
Main Description
From New York to San Francisco, Times Square to the Tenderloin, graffiti artists, young people, radical environmentalists, and the homeless clash with police on city streets in an attempt take back urban spaces from the developers and "disneyfiers". Drawing on more than a decade of first-hand research, this lively account goes inside the worlds of street musicians, homeless punks, militant bicycle activists, high-risk "BASE jump" parachutists, skateboarders, outlaw radio operators, and hip hop graffiti artists, to explore the day-to-day skirmishes in the struggle over public life and public space.
Main Description
From New York to San Francisco, Times Square to the Tenderloin, graffiti artists, young people, radical environmentalists, and the homeless clash with police on city streets in an attempt take back urban spaces from the developers and "disneyfiers". Drawing on more than a decade of first-hand research, this lively account goes inside the worlds of street musicians, homeless punks, militant bicycle activists, high-risk "BASE jump" parachutists, skateboarders, outlaw radio operators, and hiphop graffiti artists, to explore the day-to-day skirmishes in the struggle over public life and public space.
Main Description
Graffiti artists, young people, radical environmentalists, and the homeless clash with police on city streets in an attempt take back urban spaces from the developers and Disneyfiers. Drawing on more than two decades of first-hand research, this lively account goes inside the worlds of street musicians, homeless punks, militant bicycle activists, high-risk BASE jump parachutists, skateboarders, outlaw radio operators, and hip-hop graffiti artists to explore the day-to-day skirmishes in the struggle over public life and public space.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vi
A Jagged Line Down the Middle of the Streetp. 1
Wild in the Streetsp. 37
Taking Back the Streetsp. 91
We Want the Airwaves, Babyp. 149
The Towering Infernop. 179
Open Cityp. 221
Notesp. 247
Indexp. 274
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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