Catalogue


New terms for new ideas : Western knowledge and lexical change in Late Imperial China /
edited by Michael Lackner, Iwo Amelung and Joachim Kurtz.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2001.
description
xii, 456 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9004120467
format(s)
Book
Holdings
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
' …it should be read widely because of its close interrogation of the intersections between language and history and because of its problematization of the role of translation in inventing linguistic commensurabilities between peoples and cultures. Borrow it from the library and read each of the articles carefully. They are filled with information and new points of view.'Benjamin Elman, EASTM, 2004.' A rich bibliography of both Chinese and Western publications and Index contribute to the high academic value of this compendium of multidisciplinary research into the transmission of Western knowledge into China accompanied by far-reaching lexical changes.'Zdenka Hermanova, Archiv Orientalni, 2003.
'"A rich bibliography of both Chinese and Western publications and "Index" contribute to the high academic value of this compendium of multidisciplinary research into the transmission of Western knowledge into China accompanied by far-reaching lexical changes.' Zdenka Hermanova," Archiv Orientalni, 2003.
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Summaries
Main Description
This volume is about the lasting impact of new (Western) notions on the 19th and early 20th century Chinese language; their invention, spread and standardization. Reaching beyond the mere cataloguing of the thousands of lexical innovations in this period of change, the essays explore the multiple ways in which initially alien notions were naturalized in Chinese scientific and political discourse.Topics examined range from preconceptions about the capacity of the Chinese language to accommodate foreign ideas, the formation of specific nomenclatures and the roles of individual translators, to Chinese and European attempts at coming to terms with each other s grammar.By systematically analysing and assessing the lexical adaptation of Western notions in Chinese contexts, the book will serve as a valuable reference work for all those interested in the historical semantics of modern China.
Unpaid Annotation
This volume is about the lasting impact of new (Western) notions on the 19th and early 20th century Chinese language; their invention, spread and standardization. Reaching beyond the mere cataloguing of the thousands of lexical innovations in this period of change, the essays explore the multiple ways in which initially alien notions were naturalized in Chinese scientific and political discourse.Topics examined range from preconceptions about the capacity of the Chinese language to accommodate foreign ideas, the formation of specific nomenclatures and the roles of individual translators, to Chinese and European attempts at coming to terms with each other's grammar.By systematically analysing and assessing the lexical adaptation of Western notions in Chinese contexts, the book will serve as a valuable reference work for all those interested in the historical semantics of modern China.
Description for Reader
All those interested in the history of cultural interaction between China and the West, historical semantics, the history of science, modern Chinese intellectual history as well as the study of terminology.
Long Description
This volume is about the lasting impact of new (Western) notions on the 19th and early 20th century Chinese language; their invention, spread and standardization. Reaching beyond the mere cataloguing of the thousands of lexical innovations in this period of change, the essays explore the multiple ways in which initially alien notions were naturalized in Chinese scientific and political discourse. Topics examined range from preconceptions about the capacity of the Chinese language to accommodate foreign ideas, the formation of specific nomenclatures and the roles of individual translators, to Chinese and European attempts at coming to terms with each other's grammar. By systematically analysing and assessing the lexical adaptation of Western notions in Chinese contexts, the book will serve as a valuable reference work for all those interested in the historical semantics of modern China.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
Contributors
Introductionp. 1
Chinese Terminologies: On Preconceptionsp. 15
Language Contact and Lexical Innovationp. 35
Language in the Modernization Process: The Integration of Western Concepts and Terms into Chinese and Japanese in the Nineteenth Centuryp. 57
'Liberty', 'Democracy', 'President': The Translation and Usage of Some Political Terms in Late Qing Chinap. 69
Yi, Yang, Xi, Wai and Other Terms: The Transition from 'Barbarian' to 'Foreigner' in Late Imperial Chinap. 95
The Notions of 'Power' and 'Rights' in Chinese Political Discoursep. 125
Coming to Terms with Logic: The Naturalization of an Occidental Notion in Chinap. 147
An Inquiry into the History of the Chinese Terms Jiqi (Machine) and Jixie (Machinery)p. 177
Weights and Forces: The Introduction of Western Mechanics into Late Qing Chinap. 197
Yan Fu and the Tasks of the Translatorp. 235
Natural Philosophy, Physics and Metaphysics in the Thought of Tan Sitong: The Concepts of Qi and Yitaip. 257
A New Inquiry into the Translation of Chemical Terms by John Fryer and Xu Shoup. 271
The Creation of Technical Terms in English Chinese Dictionaries from the Nineteenth Centuryp. 287
On Mathematical Terminology: Culture Crossing in Nineteenth-Century Chinap. 305
The Formation of Botanical Terminology: A Model or a Case Study?p. 327
Some Reflections on the Sources of the Mashi wentongp. 341
Circumnavigating the Unfamiliar: Dao'an (314-385) and Yan Fu (1852-1921) on Western Grammarp. 357
May Fourth Linguistic Orthodoxy and Rhetoric: Some Informal Comparative Notesp. 373
Works Citedp. 411
Indexp. 449
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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