Catalogue


The body in Islamic culture /
Fuad I. Khuri ; illustrations by Jad.
imprint
London, [England] : Saqi, 2001.
description
189 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0863563198
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
London, [England] : Saqi, 2001.
isbn
0863563198
catalogue key
4611672
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [180]-183) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Fuad I. Khuri is a leading anthropologist on the Middle East. He has written extensively both in English and Arabic on various aspects of Arab culture and society
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-06-01:
Based on the author's anthropological research in several Arab countries, this book looks at perceptions of the human body in the Arab-Islamic world as they relate specifically to the Qur'an, other aspects of the religion, and social and sexual behavior. Khuri is interested especially in notions of purity and pollution, sexuality, and body symbolism and nonverbal language as they concern human interactions. The volume contains helpful drawings of body positioning to represent varying notions of gender, status, and hierarchy. However, the title is broader than the book's coverage, for Khuri's discussion and analysis concern only Arabs and not the many non-Arab Muslims throughout the world. Graduate students and faculty. L. Beck Washington University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2002
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
The concept of the body is of special importance in Islamic and Arab societies. Much of the daily interaction between peoples in these societies is related to the strict Islamic division of the universe into different spaces; the "feminine" and "masculine," the "pure" and the "polluted," the "private" and "public." Fuad I. Khuri explores the different meanings and images related to the body in Islam and how these permeate religious practices and social attitudes among people, and the numerous ways the body communicates messages, attitudes and feelings through unspoken language.
Main Description
The concept of the body is of special importance in Islamic and Arab societies as much of daily interaction between peoples in these societies is related to the strict Islamic division of the universe into different spaces; the 'feminine' and 'masculine', the 'pure' and the 'polluted', the 'private' and 'public'. This classification affects social, cultural and sexual behaviour. Consequently, the body becomes a tool used to communicate attitudes, desires, doubts and intimacy, but also to define social discourse and mores. Khuri explores the concept of the body in two phases: Firstly, the different meanings and images related to the body in Islam and how these permeate religious practices and social attitudes among people. Secondly, the numerous ways the body communicates messages, attitudes and feelings through unspoken language. His incisive exploration of how perceptions of the human body in Arab-Islamic cultures are conditioned by the teachings of the sacred text and how they translateinto behavioural terms is both insightful and mind provoking.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The concept of the body is of special importance in Islamic and Arab societies. The author explores the concept through the different meanings and images related to the body in Islam and how these permeate religious practices and social attitudes.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. 7
Prefacep. 9
Body Ideology
Body Ideology and Body Languagep. 15
The Physical Attributes of Spiritualityp. 23
The Human Body: A Religious Viewp. 35
The Pure and the Pollutedp. 49
The Impurity of Bloodp. 60
The Impurity of Semenp. 69
Body Language
The Body as a Medium of Communicationp. 89
Social distance and the Confrontational linep. 99
The Strategy of Sittingp. 111
Sexual Gestures and Body Movementsp. 125
I am 'Antara and She Loves Mep. 139
Auxiliary Gestures and Body Movementsp. 150
A Viewpoint for Discussionp. 163
The Traits of Human Languagep. 169
Endnotesp. 171
Bibliographyp. 180
Indexp. 184
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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