Catalogue


The ramparts of nations : institutions and immigration policies in France and the United States /
Jeffrey M. Togman.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2002.
description
xiv, 159 p.
ISBN
0275972542 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2002.
isbn
0275972542 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4608868
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jeffrey M. Togman is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Seton Hall University.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œ[a] most welcome contribution to the emprical study of immigration policy, as well as to the more general literature on the impact of political institutions.'' International Migration review
'œThe Ramparts of Nations is a succinct and clearly articulated book that will be of benefit to those readers interested in immigration policy.'' American Political Science Review
'œ[t]his is an important contribution to our understanding the role of political institutions in the development of immigration policy. This book is clearly written and relates a strong historical exposition to a clear analysis of the theoretical literature. More than most of the literature in this field, this fine study builds and expands on what we know and raises new questions that will be source of future research.'' Journal of American Ethnic History
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2002
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
This comparative study analyses French and U.S. immigration policies from 1945 to 2000. Focusing on critical historical junctures, Togman illustrates how different institutional structures in France and the United States led these countries to implement divergent entry policies under similar economic and cultural conditions.
Long Description
Togman provides a comparative analysis of French and U.S. immigration policies from 1945 to 2000. He explores why nations implement the immigration policies they do, why some governments allow or even encourage large-scale immigration while others restrict it, why some states shift from liberal to restrictive entry policies and vice versa. Focusing on critical historical junctures, Togman illustrates how different institutional structures in France and the United States led these countries to implement divergent entry policies. Political institutions are shown to act as an intervening variable, helping determine what, if any, influence other factors such as economic conditions and cultural traditions have over a nation's immigration laws. Scholars and students of French politics, U.S. politics, comparative politics, and immigration policies will find this work helpful.
Table of Contents
Figures and Tablesp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Abbreviationsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Explaining Immigration Policiesp. 3
The United Statesp. 25
Lazarus Betrayed and Vindicatedp. 27
U.S. Immigration Policies in Hard Timesp. 43
Cross-Cutting Reformsp. 61
Francep. 77
Bienvenuep. 79
French Immigration Policies in Hard Timesp. 97
The New Politics of French Immigrationp. 117
Conclusionp. 133
Immigration Policies in Comparative Perspectivep. 135
Bibliographyp. 145
Indexp. 153
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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