Catalogue


Elizabethan humanism : literature and learning in the later sixteenth century /
Mike Pincombe.
imprint
London ; New York : Longman, c2001.
description
x, 214 p.
ISBN
0582289807 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : Longman, c2001.
isbn
0582289807 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4603371
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2002
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
'This book is written with refreshing lucidity, and is very well organized....a really excellent piece of work which should be part of every university library, and which should be required reading for Renaissance scholars'. Dr. Rob Maslen, University of Glasgow  It is impossible to understand Elizabethan literature without a general concept of the all-important term humanism . This book offers a new perspective on the term and its application to Elizabethan literary culture, one which will help students at all levels to grasp the relationship between the texts they study and the complex group of ideas surrounding the word humanity . The opening chapter provides a comprehensive introduction to the intellectual background to Elizabethan humanism. The book then proceeds to investigate certain key ideas in greater detail, such as Ciceronian humanism and myths of cultural transfer, before moving on to a series of chapters devoted to important individual works dating from the late 1570's,  including John Lyly, Edmund Spenser, and Philip Sidney, and concluding with studies of Marlowe's Doctor Faustus and Shakespeare's Hamlet.  Written in a lucid and informal manner, Elizabethan Humanism provides an accessible guide to the basic principles underlying Elizabethan Humanism, and also equips the reader with the means of making their own informed analyses of other late sixteenth-century texts. Mike Pincombe is a Lecturer in the Department of English Literary and Linguistic Studies at the University of Newcastle.
Back Cover Copy
'This book is written with refreshing lucidity, and is very well organized....a really excellent piece of work which should be part of every university library, and which should be required reading for Renaissance scholars'. Dr. Rob Maslen, University of Glasgow It is impossible to understand Elizabethan literature without a general concept of the all-important term humanism . This book offers a new perspective on the term and its application to Elizabethan literary culture, one which will help students at all levels to grasp the relationship between the texts they study and the complex group of ideas surrounding the word humanity . The opening chapter provides a comprehensive introduction to the intellectual background to Elizabethan humanism. The book then proceeds to investigate certain key ideas in greater detail, such as Ciceronian humanism and myths of cultural transfer, before moving on to a series of chapters devoted to important individual works dating from the late 1570's, including John Lyly, Edmund Spenser, and Philip Sidney, and concluding with studies of Marlowe's Doctor Faustus and Shakespeare's Hamlet. Written in a lucid and informal manner, Elizabethan Humanism provides an accessible guide to the basic principles underlying Elizabethan Humanism, and also equips the reader with the means of making their own informed analyses of other late sixteenth-century texts. Mike Pincombe is a Lecturer in the Department of English Literary and Linguistic Studies at the University of Newcastle.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This book is an account of Elizabethan humanism, dedicated to the Elizabethan period of Renaissance writing. It offers a new perspective on the term and its appreciation to Elizabethan literary culture and helps clarify a complex group of ideas.
Long Description
The term 'humanist' originally referred to a scholar of Classical literature. In the Renaissance and particularly in the Elizabethan age, European intellectuals devoted themselves to the rediscovery and study of Roman and Greek literature and culture. This trend of Renaissance thought became known in the 19th century as 'humanism'. Often a difficult concept to understand, the term Elizabethan Humanism is introduced in Part One and explained in a number of different contexts. Part Two illustrates how knowledge of humanism allows a clearer understanding of Elizabethan literature, by looking closely at major texts of the Elizabethan period which include Spenser's, 'The Shepherd's Calendar'; Marlowe's 'Faustus' and Shakespeare's 'Hamlet'.
Long Description
The term 'humanist' originally referred to a scholar of Classical literature. In the Renaissance and particularly in the Elizabethan age, European intellectuals devoted themselves to the rediscovery and study of Roman and Greek literature and culture. This trend of Renaissance thought became known in the 19th century as 'humanism'. Often a difficult concept to understand, the term Elizabethan Humanism is introduced in Part One and explained in a number of different contexts. Part Two illustrates how knowledge of humanism allows a clearer understanding of Elizabethan literature, by looking closely at major texts of the Elizabethan period which include Spenser's, 'The Shepherd's Calendar' Marlowe's 'Faustus' and Shakespeare's 'Hamlet'.
Unpaid Annotation
B>" The term 'humanist' originally referred to a scholar of Classical literature. In the Renaissance, and particularly in the Elizabethan age, European intellectuals devoted themselves to the rediscovery and study of Roman and Greek literature and culture. This trend of Renaissance thought became known in the 19th century as 'humanism'. Often a difficult concept to understand, the term Elizabethan Humanism is introduced here and explained in a number of different contexts. Allan Pincombe illustrates how knowledge of humanism allows a clearer understanding of Elizabethan literature Elizabethan Humanism: Literature and Learning in the Later Sixteenth Century" offers an accessible guide to the basic principles underlying humanism in Elizabethan literature. It is a unique account of Elizabethan humanism, dedicated specifically to the Elizabethan period of Renaissance writing which offers an entirely new approach to the topic by using sixteenth century records of the words humanity and humanist to establish an Elizabethan meaning for the word humanism. It covers an extensive range of material including sources, background, authors and genre in order that the reader may gain a broader picture. Alan Pincombe looks closely at major texts of the Elizabethan period which include Spenser's, 'The Shepherd's Calendar'; Marlowe's 'Faustus' and Shakespeare's 'Hamlet'. For those interested in the 16th century or renaissance era literature or society.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Contextsp. 1
Elizabethan Humanismp. 3
Humanity may have a threefold sensep. 4
Humanity, literature and learningp. 9
Ciceronian Humanitasp. 15
De officiis: Humanity and bestialityp. 15
Pro Archia poeta: Humanity and poetryp. 19
Curious universal scholarshipp. 22
Wit and pleasant veinp. 29
The humane voicep. 32
Humanists and Humanitiansp. 37
Curious universal scholarsp. 37
Literary humanism: grammarians and men of lettersp. 44
Abraham Flemingp. 48
George Puttenhamp. 51
Gabriel Harveyp. 53
The Translation of Humanity: Thomas Smith and Roger Aschamp. 58
Sir Thomas Smith and the translatio humanitatisp. 59
Roger Ascham: Ciceronian and Valerian humanitasp. 66
The Schoolmaster: Courtiers and barbariansp. 72
The Arch-humanist: Gabriel Harveyp. 84
The Cambridge scholarp. 85
The scholar in civil conversationp. 91
The scholar in courtly conversationp. 96
The scholar as ruffianp. 100
Textsp. 105
Pregnant Wit: John Lyly's Euphues: The Anatomy of Witp. 107
Lyly's Euphues and Ascham's Euphuesp. 108
The prodigal scholarp. 111
Humanity and divinityp. 114
Humanity and severityp. 117
Pastoral Rudeness: Edmund Spenser's The Shepherd's Calendarp. 125
Rudeness: pastoral and rusticalp. 126
Shepherds and clownsp. 130
Pan and Apollo: the 'June' ecloguep. 133
Pan and Eliza: the 'April' ecloguep. 138
The Companion of the Camps: Sir Philip Sidney's An Apology for Poetryp. 144
Poetry, humanity and divinityp. 145
Courtiers and professorsp. 148
Honest King Arthurp. 150
Bastard poetsp. 156
Divinity, Adieu: Christopher Marlowe's Dr Faustusp. 160
Divinity and magicp. 161
Marlowe and Musaeusp. 166
Faustus and Parisp. 169
Imitations of Humanity: William Shakespeare's Hamlet, Prince of Denmarkp. 176
Hamlet the humanistp. 177
Hamlet the avengerp. 182
Hamlet the Danep. 188
Conclusionp. 196
Works Consultedp. 199
Indexp. 209
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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