Catalogue


Technology, industrial conflict, and the development of technical education in 19th-century England /
B.P. Cronin.
imprint
Aldershot ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2001.
description
xiii, 301 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
075460313X
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2001.
isbn
075460313X
catalogue key
4598935
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
SciTech Book News, March 2002
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Summaries
Long Description
Nineteenth-century employers played a crucial role in the training and education of young workers in England. This multi-disciplinary study traces the connection between problems of technical education development and the increasingly antagonistic relations with skilled workers, culminating in the Great Strike and Lockout of 1897.Charting the development of machine tools from 1850 and the pivotal work of Victorian engineers such as Whitworth and Nasmyth, the book assesses their significance in the collapse of union resistance to labour substitution. The highly important work of F.W. Taylor is reassessed, and Braverman's critique is re-appraised to reveal how British employers gained real, technical dominance over the strongest craft union, so fracturing union control of craft processes.Cronin demonstrates that employers, dominated by economic short-termism, extended their hegemony beyond the boundaries of the factory gates. Their reluctance to endorse and sponsor technical education radically influenced the perception of technical education held by government and local authorities.
Main Description
Nineteenth-century employers played a crucial role in the training and education of young workers in England. This multi-disciplinary study traces the connection between problems of technical education development and the increasingly antagonistic relations with skilled workers, culminating in the Great Strike and Lockout of 1897.Cronin demonstrates that employers, dominated by economic short-termism, extended their hegemony beyond the boundaries of the factory gates. Their reluctance to endorse and sponsor technical education radically influenced the perception of technical education held by government and local authorities.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
19th-century machine tools: the work of Maudslay, Nasmyth and Whitworth
The interaction of work and technology: the influence of F. W. Taylor and H. Braverman
Technology, changing definitions of skill and the use of child labour
Skill and the collapse of the craft apprentice system
Employers and the ideology of engineering management: the Great Strike of 1897-98 and its aftermath
Contradictions and struggle in ideas about a national system of technical education
Employers, the foundation of the City and Guilds of London Institute and government legislation
Industrial conflict and 19th-century technical and educational change
References and bibiography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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