Catalogue


Hellenic religion and Christianization c. 370-529 /
by Frank R. Trombley.
imprint
Boston : Brill Academic Publishers, 2001.
description
2 v.
ISBN
0391041215
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Boston : Brill Academic Publishers, 2001.
isbn
0391041215
general note
Originally published: Leiden : E.J. Brill, 1993-94, in series: Religions in the Graeco-Roman world.
catalogue key
4597080
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Frank R. Trombley has held visiting positions at Georgetown University, Dumbarton Oaks, University of California (Los Angeles), and King's College London. He is now a lecturer in religious studies at Cardiff College, University of Wales
Summaries
Description for Reader
Philologists, students and specialists in the history of religion in Late Antiquity, of urban and village history of Late Antiquity, and of epigraphy.
Main Description
Christianity seeped into the social, political, and religious fabric of the Roman Empire at an incredible pace, and during the late fourth to early sixth centuries the effects of christianization upon both the city and the countryside were profound. Frank Trombley looks specifically at this process he calls christianization and at the points of conjuncture between the old and new religions, wherein the ordinary people of the Greek cities and their semi-Greek hinterlands accepted radical changes in their religious allegiances at the behest of Christian bishops, their deacons and periodeutai, the monks, and ultimately of the Christen emperors (preface). Trombley s view encompasses not the intellectual elite but the ordinary folk of religious life. He studies, for example the effect of the laws against sacrifice and sorcery instituted by the Christian religion upon the Greek religious practices of the general populace. He also instructs us how official sanctions against pagan gods and the christianization of rite become the backdrop for better understanding conversion to Christianity. Trombley s firm grasp on a variety of complex disciplines reassures the reader throughout that his conclusions are informed by rigorous analysis.This publication has also been published in hardback, please click here for details."
Unpaid Annotation
Christianity seeped into the social, political, and religious fabric of the Roman Empire at an incredible pace, and during the late fourth to early sixth centuries the effects of christianization upon both the city and the countryside were profound. Frank Trombley looks specifically at this process he calls "christianization" and at the "points of conjuncture between the old and new religions, wherein the ordinary people of the Greek cities and their semi-Greek hinterlands accepted radical changes in their religious allegiances at the behest of Christian bishops, their deacons and periodeutai, the monks, and ultimately of the Christen emperors" (preface). Trombley's view encompasses not the intellectual elite but the "ordinary folk" of religious life. He studies, for example the effect of the laws against sacrifice and sorcery instituted by the Christian religion upon the Greek religious practices of the general populace. He also instructs us how official sanctions against pagan gods and the christianization of rite become the backdrop for better understanding conversion to Christianity. Trombley's firm grasp on a variety of complex disciplines reassures the reader throughout that his conclusions are informed by rigorous analysis. This publication has also been published in hardback, please click here for details.
Main Description
This work traces the decline of Greek religion and christianization of the Eastern Roman Empire between the death of Julian the Apostate and the legislation of Justinian the Great against paganism. It treats both urban and rural affairs, with particular emphasis on interpreting the epigraphy.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
Abbreviationsp. xiv
The Philoponoi of Alexandria and Hellenic Religionp. 1
The Social Background of Zachariah of Mytilene's Friendsp. 2
Relations among the Pagan and Christian Professors and Students: Paralios of Aphrodisiasp. 4
Some Conversions in Alexandriap. 15
Some Alexandrian Connections with Aphrodisias in the Reign of Zeno (c. 488-491)p. 20
The Philoponoi in Berytus and the Eradication of Magicp. 29
Conclusionsp. 45
Aphrodisiasp. 52
Hellenic Religion in Society and Culturep. 52
Class Status and Christianizationp. 58
Christian Aphrodisiasp. 69
Conclusionsp. 71
Asia Minorp. 74
Hypatius of Rufinianae and the Christianization of Rural Bithynia c. 443-446p. 76
The Christianization of Phrygia c. 350-450p. 96
The Territorium of Hierapolis c. 400 in Light of the Aberkios Legendp. 114
The Territorium of Pessinus in Galatia Salutarisp. 118
Eastern Anatolia: Cappadocia and Isauriap. 120
Conclusionsp. 129
Arabs and Aramaeans in the Syrian Countrysidep. 134
Libanius on Polytheism in the Territorium of Antioch in 386p. 134
Monks and Christianization in Syriap. 143
Arab Polytheism in Light of the Safaitic Inscriptionsp. 173
Symeon Stylites the Elder: A Semitic Viewp. 184
The Syrian Countryside, Christianization, and the World Beyondp. 200
Conclusionsp. 204
The Nile Valley from Canopus to Philaep. 205
Shenute of Atripe and the Cults of the Middle Nile Valleyp. 207
The Closure of the Isis Temple at Canopus c. 487-89p. 219
The Cults of Philae in the Mid-Fifth Centuryp. 225
Christian Philae and the Synoikism of Cultsp. 235
Conclusionsp. 239
Sacrifice in Fourth-Century Oxyrhynchusp. 241
The Antiochene and the Apamenep. 247
The Antiochene: Djebel Sim`anp. 257
The Antiochene: Djebel Halaqahp. 263
The Antiochene: Djebel Barishap. 268
The Antiochene: The Orontes Basinp. 274
The Antiochene: The North Slope of Djebel Riha (Djebel Zawiyeh)p. 279
The Apamene: Southern Djebel Rihap. 283
The Apamene: Tarutia Emporon and Its Environsp. 295
The Apamene: Central and Southern Djebel il-`Alap. 301
Conclusionsp. 311
The "One God" Inscriptionsp. 313
The Bostrene, Djebel Hauran and the Ledjap. 317
The Bostrenep. 320
Djebel Hauranp. 339
The Ledjap. 358
Conclusionsp. 372
The God of Aumos at Deir el-Lebenp. 375
Temple Conversions and the Survival of Cult in the Early Sixth Centuryp. 377
Epiloguep. 380
Bibliographyp. 387
Errata and Additamenta to Part Ip. 403
General Indexp. 405
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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