Catalogue


Gandhi /
David Arnold.
imprint
Harlow, England ; New York : Longman, 2001.
description
x, 266 p. : ill., ports.
ISBN
0582319781 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Harlow, England ; New York : Longman, 2001.
isbn
0582319781 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4595672
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
David Arnold is Professor of South Asian History at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Arnold has a way of seeing events very clearly. He has a fine eye for detail. History
"Arnold has a way of seeing events very clearly. He has a fine eye for detail." History
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Few individuals have made so great a mark upon their times, and yet Gandhi never held high political office, commanded no armies and was not even a compelling orator. How then can his power be explained? How and why did the shy student and affluent lawyer come to challenge a Western empire? David Arnold s fascinating profile tracks Mahatma Gandhi s influence and image over more than forty years of public life: the struggle for the rights of Indians in South Africa which pitched him against white racism Gandhi s techniques of non-cooperation and civil disobedience to drive out the British and wrest India's freedom his ascendancy over the British, the Salt March of 1930, his unique appeal as both Hindu saint and ordinary colonial subject why India s independence in 1947, and violent partition, was not the freedom for which Gandhi had struggled Gandhi s bitter disillusionment before his assassination in January 1948 In leading India to independence, Gandhi also contributed uniquely to British political life and to the eventual dissolution of a worldwide Empire. This is a vivid introduction to his life and times. DAVID ARNOLD is Professor of South Asian History at the School of Oriental and African Studies in the University of London.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Ghandi was not only the most important Indian figure of the 20th century, he is the most famous pacifist ever. This is a highly readable examination of Ghandi and the nature of his often unconventional and controversial power.
Long Description
Gandhi's is an extraordinary and compelling story. Few individuals in history have made so great a mark upon their times. And yet Gandhi never held high political office, commanded no armies and was not even a compelling orator. His 'power' therefore makes a particularly fascinating subject for investigation. David Arnold explains how and why the shy student and affluent lawyer became one of the most powerful anti-colonial figures Western empires in Asia ever faced and why he aroused such intense affection, loyalty (and at times much bitter hatred) among Indians and Westerners alike. Attaching as much influence to the idea and image of Gandhi as to the man himself, Arnold sees Gandhi not just as a Hindu saint but as a colonial subject, whose attitudes and experiences expressed much that was common to countless others in India and elsewhere who sought to grapple with the overwhelming power and cultural authority of the West. A vivid and highly readable introducation to Gandhi's life and times, Arnold's book opens up fascinating insights into one of the twentieth century's most remarkable men.
Main Description
Few individuals have made so great a mark upon their times, and yet Gandhi never held high political office, commanded no armies and was not even a compelling orator. How then can his power be explained? How and why did the shy student and affluent lawyer come to challenge a Western empire?David Arnold's fascinating profile tracks 'Mahatma' Gandhi's influence and image over more than forty years of public life: the struggle for the rights of Indians in South Africa which pitched him against white racism Gandhi's techniques of non-cooperation and civil disobedience to drive out the British and wrest India's freedom his ascendancy over the British, the Salt March of 1930, his unique appeal as both Hindu saint and ordinary colonial subject why India's independence in 1947, and violent partition, was not the freedom for which Gandhi had struggled Gandhi's bitter disillusionment before his assassination in January 1948 In leading India to independence, Gandhi also contributed uniquely to British political life and to the eventual dissolution of a worldwide Empire. This is a vivid introduction to his life and times. DAVID ARNOLD is Professor of South Asian History at the School of Oriental and African Studies in the University of London.
Table of Contents
List of platesp. vii
List of mapsp. viii
Prefacep. ix
Introduction: The Idea of Gandhip. 1
A Diwan's Sonp. 15
The India of the Princesp. 15
Caste and the Baniasp. 21
Gandhi and his Familyp. 26
Religious Life in Kathiawarp. 30
Gandhi in Londonp. 34
South Africa and Self-Rulep. 44
Indians in South Africap. 44
A Lawyer in Natalp. 49
'Truth-Force'p. 53
The Mantle of Mahatmap. 60
'Civilisation' and 'Slavery'p. 64
Peasant Powerp. 73
Village Indiap. 74
The Raj and the Congressp. 78
Gandhi in Champaranp. 83
The Kheda Satyagrahap. 88
The Ahmedabad Strike of 1918p. 91
A Peasant Congress?p. 95
Power to the Nationp. 104
Gandhi and the First World Warp. 105
The Rowlatt Satyagrahap. 109
Congress Reorganisationp. 115
Non-Cooperation and Civil Disobediencep. 118
Khadi and the Constructive Programmep. 126
Trial and Imprisonmentp. 131
'Half-Naked Fakir'p. 136
The Swarajists and the Bardoli Satyagrahap. 136
'Simon Go Back'p. 141
The Salt Satyagrahap. 144
Civil Disobediencep. 148
The Gandhi-Irwin Pactp. 151
London and the Round Table Conferencep. 156
The Lone Satyagrahi: Gandhi, Religion and Societyp. 163
Gandhi's Religionp. 164
Caste and Untouchabilityp. 169
The 'Epic Fast' and Harijan Campaignp. 175
Gandhi Adriftp. 181
Women and Gendered Politicsp. 185
Gandhi in Old Age: Triumph or Nemesis?p. 195
Gandhi, Nehru and Bosep. 196
The Office Questionp. 201
'Quit India'p. 207
One Nation--or Two?p. 216
Independence and Partitionp. 220
The Assassinationp. 223
Conclusionp. 231
Glossaryp. 236
Guide to Further Readingp. 238
Chronologyp. 249
Mapsp. 253
Indexp. 259
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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