Catalogue


Hong Kong, Empire and the Anglo-American alliance at war, 1941-45 /
Andrew J. Whitfield.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave, 2001.
description
xii, 266 p. : maps.
ISBN
0333793331
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave, 2001.
isbn
0333793331
catalogue key
4594933
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-06-01:
Hong Kong, the least defensible (and perhaps most dispensable) of Britain's Asian colonies, fell quickly to the Japanese in December 1941. The question this book addresses is whether the British--allied with the anticolonialist Chinese and Americans--should have gotten Hong Kong back after the war. Using declassified government documents, mostly British, Whitfield (British Ministry of Defence) sees in this question a "crisis of imperial confidence," in which British leaders confronted a "stark choice" between "imperial thinking and tangible British interests." The secret British memoranda pro and con on this issue are the most interesting part of the book. After presenting the case made for abandoning Hong Kong in favor of Britain's larger strategic and economic interests, Whitfield himself comes down on the other side, sympathetically portraying those who put "imperial thinking" first. Thus the US rather than Japan appears to be Britain's real opponent in the war. As is so often the case with writers whose research principally comes from formerly secret British documents, Whitfield charges the US with "incoherence" in their own policy, "pathological dislike of British colonialism," and "arrogant and uninformed presumptuousness" overall. For graduate students. J. R. Breihan Loyola College in Maryland
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2002
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
The surrender of Hong Kong to the Japanese in December 1941 started the collapse of British power in the Far East. Disproportionate to its small size, the colony became critical in Britain's battle to retain her Empire. Ironically, the larger threat to British sovereignty came not from the Japan, but from her own allies, America and China. Andrew Whitfield sheds new light on the multi-faceted Anglo-American relationship, the significance of Britain's "imperial mentality", and China's claim to the colony.
Main Description
The surrender of Hong Kong to the Japanese in December 1941 started the collapse of British power in the Far East. Disproportionate to its small size, the colony became critical in Britain's battle to retain her Empire. Ironically, the larger threat to British sovereignty came not from the Japan, but from her own allies, America and China. Andrew Whitfield sheds new light on the multi-faceted Anglo-American relationship, the significance of Britain's "imperial mentality", and China's claimto the colony.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vi
List of Abbreviationsp. ix
Chronologyp. x
Introductionp. 1
Return and Departure: the Fall and Recapture of Hong Kong, 1941 and 1945p. 5
The Meaning of Empire: Imperial Consensus, Whitehall and Hong Kongp. 16
The Anglo-American Relationship at War, 1941-45p. 40
An Empire Brought into Question, 1942p. 61
China Claims Hong Kong, 1942-43p. 85
London's Hong Kong Planning, 1943-44p. 107
Anglo-American Military Strategy in the Far East, 1942-44p. 125
The Cairo Conferencep. 150
Hard Choices: Yalta, the Death of a President and San Francisco, November 1944-june 1945p. 163
Return of the Empire: the Defeat of Japan, July-september 1945p. 186
Conclusionp. 212
Epiloguep. 217
Notesp. 222
Bibliographyp. 246
Indexp. 252
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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