Catalogue


Contemporary Chinese politics : an introduction /
James C.F. Wang.
edition
7th ed.
imprint
Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Prentice Hall, c2002.
description
xvi, 426 p. : ill., map.
ISBN
0130907820
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
imprint
Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Prentice Hall, c2002.
isbn
0130907820
catalogue key
4592425
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Introduction or Preface
The seventh edition of Contemporary Chinese Politics: An Introduction,originally published in 1980 and revised in 1985, 1989, 1992, 1995, and 1999, is designed for both undergraduate and graduate students. The publisher and author have striven to make the text as current and as comprehensive as possible by revising and updating its content periodically. The events unfolding in China necessitate such revision and updating. This edition contains some major revisions and additions in a number of areas. In Chapter 3 a new section is added containing an examination of recent developments in promoting "Jiang Zemin Thought" to the level of Mao and Deng, but which is designed to unify the various contending factions within the leadership. Discussion here is intended to explore the meaning of Jiang''s recent ideological pronouncement of the "Three Representations" and the "Three Stresses or Talks:" In Chapter 4 an added section addresses recent amendments to the state constitution, such as recognition of private businesses as an important component to the socialist market economy (Article 6); recognition of the various rural cooperatives as belonging to the socialist market economy (Article 8); and also deletion of the term "counterrevolutionary" from Article 28. In Chapter 5 a new section is added on corruption in China''s officialdom, a sort of "malignant tumor" in Chinese body-politics. This new section considers corruption in terms of its scope, forms, causes, and remedial actions taken in recent years. In Chapter 7, there is discussion about the introduction of primary elections on the direct village level--elections whereby villagers could write the names of their favored candidates on blank ballots. There is discussion of the extension of popular elections to townships and counties, and the possible impact of this approach on the party''s control and prestige. Also added to Chapter 7 is a review dealing with the Muslim unrest in China''9 vast western region, particularly in the Xinjiang Autonomous Region, and a discussion on China''s environmental problems and questions that were raised in response to the building of the gigantic Three Gorges Dam. Three new sections are added to Chapter 10. One deals with the problem of Hong Kong''s judicial independence that was raised as a result of cases on the court''s residency ruling and defacing of the Chinese flag. The second new section deals with the historical background of Taiwan unification, the origin of the "one China" formula, and a possible solution to the Taiwan problem within the framework of "one China:" Third, a new section is added that deals with the reasons for suppressing the quasi-religious meditation sect, the Falun Gong (Wheels of Law). The examination focuses not only on the reason for the ban, but also provides a historic perspective in terms of "overreacting" to a religious movement, thereby "politicizing" it. In Chapter 11 there is a section added that discusses the target set for year 2002 on reform in the troubled state-owned enterprises: including reduction of the size and the number of these establishments, as well as the gradual introduction of other forms of ownership along with public or state ownership. Finally, in Chapter 12, a brief discussion is made on problems associated with implementation of the new nine-year compulsory education program in China. A new feature has been added to this edition: a suggested bibliography at the end of each chapter intended as a reference for students and teachers alike. Most of these entries represent recent publications in the Chinese study field. These bibliographies augment the footnote citations for each chapter. The preparation of the seventh edition of this book on contemporary Chinese politics would not have been possible without the help of a number of persons. Many colleagues from a large number of universities and colleges have made useful comments and suggestions. To all of them I owe a debt of gratitude. Once again I must acknowledge my great indebtedness to those China scholars whose work is cited in the text. I would also like to thank political science editors at Prentice Hall, particularly Brian Prybella and Joanne Riker, for rendering invaluable assistance in reading of the manuscript for style. And many thanks to Edith Worsencroft for typing and some editing of the revised manuscript.
Introduction or Preface
The seventh edition ofContemporary Chinese Politics: An Introduction,originally published in 1980 and revised in 1985, 1989, 1992, 1995, and 1999, is designed for both undergraduate and graduate students. The publisher and author have striven to make the text as current and as comprehensive as possible by revising and updating its content periodically. The events unfolding in China necessitate such revision and updating.This edition contains some major revisions and additions in a number of areas. In Chapter 3 a new section is added containing an examination of recent developments in promoting "Jiang Zemin Thought" to the level of Mao and Deng, but which is designed to unify the various contending factions within the leadership. Discussion here is intended to explore the meaning of Jiang's recent ideological pronouncement of the "Three Representations" and the "Three Stresses or Talks:"In Chapter 4 an added section addresses recent amendments to the state constitution, such as recognition of private businesses as an important component to the socialist market economy (Article 6); recognition of the various rural cooperatives as belonging to the socialist market economy (Article 8); and also deletion of the term "counterrevolutionary" from Article 28.In Chapter 5 a new section is added on corruption in China's officialdom, a sort of "malignant tumor" in Chinese body-politics. This new section considers corruption in terms of its scope, forms, causes, and remedial actions taken in recent years.In Chapter 7, there is discussion about the introduction of primary elections on the direct village level--elections whereby villagers could write the names of their favored candidates on blank ballots. There is discussion of the extension of popular elections to townships and counties, and the possible impact of this approach on the party's control and prestige.Also added to Chapter 7 is a review dealing with the Muslim unrest in China'9 vast western region, particularly in the Xinjiang Autonomous Region, and a discussion on China's environmental problems and questions that were raised in response to the building of the gigantic Three Gorges Dam.Three new sections are added to Chapter 10. One deals with the problem of Hong Kong's judicial independence that was raised as a result of cases on the court's residency ruling and defacing of the Chinese flag. The second new section deals with the historical background of Taiwan unification, the origin of the "one China" formula, and a possible solution to the Taiwan problem within the framework of "one China:"Third, a new section is added that deals with the reasons for suppressing the quasi-religious meditation sect, the Falun Gong (Wheels of Law). The examination focuses not only on the reason for the ban, but also provides a historic perspective in terms of "overreacting" to a religious movement, thereby "politicizing" it.In Chapter 11 there is a section added that discusses the target set for year 2002 on reform in the troubled state-owned enterprises: including reduction of the size and the number of these establishments, as well as the gradual introduction of other forms of ownership along with public or state ownership.Finally, in Chapter 12, a brief discussion is made on problems associated with implementation of the new nine-year compulsory education program in China.A new feature has been added to this edition: a suggested bibliography at the end of each chapter intended as a reference for students and teachers alike. Most of these entries represent recent publications in the Chinese study field. These bibliographies augment the footnote citations for each chapter.The preparation of the seventh edition of this book on contemporary Chinese politics would not have been possible without the help of a number of persons. Many colleagues from a large number of universities and colleges have made us
Introduction or Preface
The seventh edition ofContemporary Chinese Politics: An Introduction,originally published in 1980 and revised in 1985, 1989, 1992, 1995, and 1999, is designed for both undergraduate and graduate students. The publisher and author have striven to make the text as current and as comprehensive as possible by revising and updating its content periodically. The events unfolding in China necessitate such revision and updating. This edition contains some major revisions and additions in a number of areas. In Chapter 3 a new section is added containing an examination of recent developments in promoting "Jiang Zemin Thought" to the level of Mao and Deng, but which is designed to unify the various contending factions within the leadership. Discussion here is intended to explore the meaning of Jiang's recent ideological pronouncement of the "Three Representations" and the "Three Stresses or Talks:" In Chapter 4 an added section addresses recent amendments to the state constitution, such as recognition of private businesses as an important component to the socialist market economy (Article 6); recognition of the various rural cooperatives as belonging to the socialist market economy (Article 8); and also deletion of the term "counterrevolutionary" from Article 28. In Chapter 5 a new section is added on corruption in China's officialdom, a sort of "malignant tumor" in Chinese body-politics. This new section considers corruption in terms of its scope, forms, causes, and remedial actions taken in recent years. In Chapter 7, there is discussion about the introduction of primary elections on the direct village level--elections whereby villagers could write the names of their favored candidates on blank ballots. There is discussion of the extension of popular elections to townships and counties, and the possible impact of this approach on the party's control and prestige. Also added to Chapter 7 is a review dealing with the Muslim unrest in China'9 vast western region, particularly in the Xinjiang Autonomous Region, and a discussion on China's environmental problems and questions that were raised in response to the building of the gigantic Three Gorges Dam. Three new sections are added to Chapter 10. One deals with the problem of Hong Kong's judicial independence that was raised as a result of cases on the court's residency ruling and defacing of the Chinese flag. The second new section deals with the historical background of Taiwan unification, the origin of the "one China" formula, and a possible solution to the Taiwan problem within the framework of "one China:" Third, a new section is added that deals with the reasons for suppressing the quasi-religious meditation sect, the Falun Gong (Wheels of Law). The examination focuses not only on the reason for the ban, but also provides a historic perspective in terms of "overreacting" to a religious movement, thereby "politicizing" it. In Chapter 11 there is a section added that discusses the target set for year 2002 on reform in the troubled state-owned enterprises: including reduction of the size and the number of these establishments, as well as the gradual introduction of other forms of ownership along with public or state ownership. Finally, in Chapter 12, a brief discussion is made on problems associated with implementation of the new nine-year compulsory education program in China. A new feature has been added to this edition: a suggested bibliography at the end of each chapter intended as a reference for students and teachers alike. Most of these entries represent recent publications in the Chinese study field. These bibliographies augment the footnote citations for each chapter. The preparation of the seventh edition of this book on contemporary Chinese politics would not have been possible without the help of a number of persons. Many colleagues from a large number of universities and colleges have made us
First Chapter

The seventh edition ofContemporary Chinese Politics: An Introduction,originally published in 1980 and revised in 1985, 1989, 1992, 1995, and 1999, is designed for both undergraduate and graduate students. The publisher and author have striven to make the text as current and as comprehensive as possible by revising and updating its content periodically. The events unfolding in China necessitate such revision and updating.

This edition contains some major revisions and additions in a number of areas. In Chapter 3 a new section is added containing an examination of recent developments in promoting "Jiang Zemin Thought" to the level of Mao and Deng, but which is designed to unify the various contending factions within the leadership. Discussion here is intended to explore the meaning of Jiang's recent ideological pronouncement of the "Three Representations" and the "Three Stresses or Talks:"

In Chapter 4 an added section addresses recent amendments to the state constitution, such as recognition of private businesses as an important component to the socialist market economy (Article 6); recognition of the various rural cooperatives as belonging to the socialist market economy (Article 8); and also deletion of the term "counterrevolutionary" from Article 28.

In Chapter 5 a new section is added on corruption in China's officialdom, a sort of "malignant tumor" in Chinese body-politics. This new section considers corruption in terms of its scope, forms, causes, and remedial actions taken in recent years.

In Chapter 7, there is discussion about the introduction of primary elections on the direct village level—elections whereby villagers could write the names of their favored candidates on blank ballots. There is discussion of the extension of popular elections to townships and counties, and the possible impact of this approach on the party's control and prestige.

Also added to Chapter 7 is a review dealing with the Muslim unrest in China'9 vast western region, particularly in the Xinjiang Autonomous Region, and a discussion on China's environmental problems and questions that were raised in response to the building of the gigantic Three Gorges Dam.

Three new sections are added to Chapter 10. One deals with the problem of Hong Kong's judicial independence that was raised as a result of cases on the court's residency ruling and defacing of the Chinese flag. The second new section deals with the historical background of Taiwan unification, the origin of the "one China" formula, and a possible solution to the Taiwan problem within the framework of "one China:"

Third, a new section is added that deals with the reasons for suppressing the quasi-religious meditation sect, the Falun Gong (Wheels of Law). The examination focuses not only on the reason for the ban, but also provides a historic perspective in terms of "overreacting" to a religious movement, thereby "politicizing" it.

In Chapter 11 there is a section added that discusses the target set for year 2002 on reform in the troubled state-owned enterprises: including reduction of the size and the number of these establishments, as well as the gradual introduction of other forms of ownership along with public or state ownership.

Finally, in Chapter 12, a brief discussion is made on problems associated with implementation of the new nine-year compulsory education program in China.

A new feature has been added to this edition: a suggested bibliography at the end of each chapter intended as a reference for students and teachers alike. Most of these entries represent recent publications in the Chinese study field. These bibliographies augment the footnote citations for each chapter.

The preparation of the seventh edition of this book on contemporary Chinese politics would not have been possible without the help of a number of persons. Many colleagues from a large number of universities and colleges have made useful comments and suggestions. To all of them I owe a debt of gratitude. Once again I must acknowledge my great indebtedness to those China scholars whose work is cited in the text. I would also like to thank political science editors at Prentice Hall, particularly Brian Prybella and Joanne Riker, for rendering invaluable assistance in reading of the manuscript for style. And many thanks to Edith Worsencroft for typing and some editing of the revised manuscript.

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Summaries
Main Description
This comprehensive, accurate, and up-to-date book provides information and analysis for a complete examination of contemporary China and its political and economic developments.Chapter topics include the origin and rise of the Chinese communist movement: from military communism to Deng's reforms; the erosion of Chinese communist ideology: Marxism-Leninism, Mao's thought, Dengism, and the thinking of Jiang Zemin; political institutions of the party-state: structural issues and the policy process; Elites and the Cadre System: leadership style, factionalism, succession, and recruitment; reform for a creditable Socialist legal system; provincial and local politics: centralism versus regionalism, national minorities, and the case of Tibet; Greater China: reversion of Hong Kong and Macao, and the Pearl River delta regional development, and the Taiwan Question; The military's role in Chinese politics; democracy, dissent, and the Tiananmen mass movement; the politics of modernization: rural and urban economic reforms; and the politics of modernization: education, science and technology, the open door policy, and the intellectuals.For individuals interested in Chinese politics.
Main Description
This comprehensive, accurate, and up-to-date book provides information and analysis for a complete examination of contemporary China and its political and economic developments. Chapter topics include the origin and rise of the Chinese communist movement: from military communism to Deng's reforms; the erosion of Chinese communist ideology: Marxism-Leninism, Mao's thought, Dengism, and the thinking of Jiang Zemin; political institutions of the party-state: structural issues and the policy process; Elites and the Cadre System: leadership style, factionalism, succession, and recruitment; reform for a creditable Socialist legal system; provincial and local politics: centralism versus regionalism, national minorities, and the case of Tibet; Greater China: reversion of Hong Kong and Macao, and the Pearl River delta regional development, and the Taiwan Question; The military's role in Chinese politics; democracy, dissent, and the Tiananmen mass movement; the politics of modernization: rural and urban economic reforms; and the politics of modernization: education, science and technology, the open door policy, and the intellectuals. For individuals interested in Chinese politics.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
Romanization of Chinese Names of Persons and Placesp. xiii
Introduction: Historical and Cultural Perspectivesp. 1
The Land and the Peoplep. 1
A Glimpse of China's Early Historyp. 2
The Manchus: The Last Imperial Rulers of Chinap. 5
The Traditional Chinese Political Systemp. 6
Attempts at Reform and Modernizationp. 9
The Chinese Nationalist Revolution, 1911-1937p. 10
Notesp. 13
Suggested Readingsp. 14
The Origin and Rise of the Chinese Communist Movement: From Military Communism to Deng's Reformsp. 15
The Early Yearsp. 15
China's Search for a Development Modelp. 19
The Cultural Revolutionp. 26
The "Gang of Four" and the Trialp. 29
Notesp. 33
Suggested Readingsp. 36
The Erosion of Chinese Communist Ideology: Marxism-Leninism, Mao's Thought, Dengism, and the Thinking of Jiang Zeminp. 37
Marxism-Leninismp. 38
The Thought of Mao Zedongp. 40
Mao's Legacy and De-Maoizationp. 48
Ideology in Flux: Resurgence and Redefinitionp. 53
Dengism: China as an Economic Giant in the Twenty-First Centuryp. 55
Promotion of "Jiang Zemin's Thought": A Unifying Ideology for the New Erap. 56
Notesp. 63
Suggested Readingsp. 68
Political Institutions of the Party-State: Structural Issues and the Policy Processp. 69
The Hierarchical Structure of the Partyp. 70
Central-Level Party Organs and Functionsp. 70
Provincial Party Organs and Functionsp. 81
Primary Party Organs and Functionsp. 82
The Government and the Party: Interlocking Structure and Decision Makingp. 83
Recent Constitutional Amendments, 1999p. 85
National People's Congress and Its Lawmaking Rolep. 87
The State Councilp. 92
Problems in China's Political Institutionsp. 95
Notesp. 100
Suggested Readingsp. 103
Elites and the Cadre System: Leadership Style, Factionalism, Succession, and Recruitmentp. 105
Characteristics of the Ruling Elitep. 105
Elite, Strife, Factionalism, and Chinese Informal Politicsp. 106
Jiang Zemin: Head of the New Leadership Core as Deng-Designated Successorp. 112
The New Leadership Corep. 114
For The Twenty-First Century: The Fourth Generation of Leadersp. 118
Recruitment of Party Membersp. 118
The Development of the Chinese Bureaucracy: The Cadre Systemp. 124
Corruption: A "Malignant Tumor" in Chinese Body-Politicsp. 129
The New Civil Service Systemp. 132
Notesp. 133
Suggested Readingsp. 138
Reform for a Creditable Socialist Legal Systemp. 139
The Chinese Legal Systemp. 139
The Criminal Code and Human Rights Violationsp. 143
Civil Code and Economic Reformp. 146
Informal Practices and Community Mediationp. 152
The Public Security Bureau: Law Enforcementp. 153
The National Security Agency and State Securityp. 155
Is China Moving toward Rule of Law?p. 156
Notesp. 157
Suggested Readingsp. 160
Provincial and Local Politics: Centralism versus Regionalism, National Minorities, and the Case of Tibetp. 161
Overview of Provincial and Local Governmentp. 161
Issues in Provincial Politicsp. 162
Changing Center-Provincial Relations in the Post-Deng Transitionp. 169
Local Governments in Chinap. 171
Ethnic Politics: Autonomous Regions and National Minoritiesp. 177
Tibet: A Case Studyp. 181
China's Environmental Problemsp. 186
The Three Gorges Dam: A Gigantic Reservoir and an Environmental Problemp. 188
Notesp. 189
Suggested Readingsp. 195
Greater China: Reversion of Hong Kong and Macao, the Pearl River Delta Regional Development, and the Taiwan Questionp. 196
Hong Kong: China's Special Administrative Regionp. 197
Hong Kong: Historic Backgroundp. 197
The Basic Law of Hong Kong after 1997p. 201
Popular Electoral Contests: 1991 and 1995p. 204
Hong Kong after the Reversionp. 207
Hong Kong's "Miracle" Economyp. 211
The Issue of Hong Kong's Judicial Independencep. 215
Macao: The Second Special Administrative Regionp. 217
Macao Under the 1987 Sino-Portuguese Joint Declaration and the 1993 Basic Lawp. 219
Greater China: Pearl River Delta Regional Developmentp. 222
Economic Regionalism, or "Federalism, Chinese Style,"p. 226
The Taiwan Question: Suggestion for a Possible Solutionp. 227
Notesp. 232
Suggested Readingsp. 237
The Military's Role in Chinese Politicsp. 238
How to Explain the Military's Role in Chinese Politicsp. 238
Party-Army Symbiosis Approachp. 240
Military Reform and Modernizationp. 246
China's Defense Spendingp. 252
Jiang Zemin and the Professional Officer Corpsp. 253
China's Nuclear Weapon Development: "Limited Deterrence" Conceptp. 256
Chinese Arms Sales Abroad and the Missile Proliferationp. 257
China's Defense Industries: The Military-Industrial Complex, Chinese Stylep. 259
The People's Armed Force: A Countervailing Force to the PLA?p. 261
Notesp. 262
Suggested Readingsp. 268
Democracy, Dissent, and the Tiananmen Mass Movementp. 269
Democracy and Dissent in China: Problems in Exercising Political Rightsp. 270
Student Demonstrations for Democracy and Political Reform, 1986-1987p. 273
The Tiananmen Mass Movement: April-June 1989p. 277
The State of Dissent and Possible Future Protestsp. 287
Democracy for China: Divergent Views from Exiled Dissidentsp. 289
Falun Gong Ban ("The Wheel of Law"): Why Crackdown Mysticism?p. 293
Possible Protests for the Futurep. 294
Notesp. 295
Suggested Readingsp. 299
The Politics of Modernization: Rural and Urban Economic Reformsp. 301
Modernization as a Conceptp. 301
Brief Overview of China's Economic Developmentp. 303
Agricultural (Rural) Reform: The Responsibility Systemp. 310
Urban Reform: Meaning and Problemsp. 318
State-Owned Enterprises: Reform or Privatization?p. 323
China's Economic Reform and Modernization: Deng's Legacyp. 326
Notesp. 330
Suggested Readingsp. 335
The Politics of Modernization: Education, Science and Technology, the Open Door Policy, and the Intellectualsp. 338
Devastating Effects of the Cultural Revolution on China's Educational Systemp. 338
Educational Reform, 1985-1989p. 340
Education in China after Tiananmenp. 342
Campus Docility and State Surveillancep. 343
1993-2000: Targets for Renewed Educational Reformp. 345
The Three-Pronged Approach to Scientific and Technological Modernization, 1978-1997p. 350
Accelerating Advancement in Science and Technology, 1995-2010p. 355
The Open Door Policy: Acquisition and Transfer of Science and Technologyp. 358
The Treatment of Chinese Intellectualsp. 361
Chinese Intellectuals after Tiananmenp. 363
Notesp. 364
Suggested Readingsp. 369
The Constitution of the People's Republic of China (1982)p. 371
Table of Contentsp. 372
Preamblep. 372
General Principlesp. 374
The Fundamental Rights and Duties of Citizensp. 379
The Structure of the Statep. 382
The National Flag, the National Emblem, and the Capitalp. 396
The Constitution of the Communist Party of China (1982)p. 397
Membershipp. 401
Organizational System of the Partyp. 404
Central Organizations of the Partyp. 406
Local Organizations of the Partyp. 408
Primary Organizations of the Partyp. 410
Party Cadresp. 412
Party Disciplinep. 413
Party Organs for Discipline Inspectionp. 414
Leading Party Members' Groupsp. 415
Relationship Between the Party and the Communist Youth Leaguep. 416
Revision of Some Articles of the Constitution of the Communist Party of China (1987)p. 417
Amendment to the CCP Constitution (September 1997)p. 421
Indexp. 423
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