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The making of the United Kingdom, 1660-1800 : state, religion and identity in Britain and Ireland /
Jim Smyth.
imprint
Harlow, England ; New York : Longman, 2001.
description
xv, 252 p., [7] p. of plates : ill., maps.
ISBN
0582089980 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Harlow, England ; New York : Longman, 2001.
isbn
0582089980 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4592183
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jim Smyth is Associate Professor of Irish and British History, University of Notre Dame.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-07-01:
With the creation of the European Union and the devolution of power from the parliament in London to legislatures in Scotland, Wales, and Ireland, the time has come to take another look at the so-called United Kingdom. This volume emphasizes how difficult it always has been to create a truly united kingdom out of four rather different nations. Since 1800, as a result, the term "Great Britain and Ireland" best describes the situation. In large measure, the reasons for the difficulty come from the three aspects Smyth examines: state, religion, and identity. While a chapter or two could have been better integrated into the themes, and while Wales gets infrequent mention, the book does pull together a wide range of information. Although not primarily a piece of original research, for people with a sound knowledge of 17th- and 18th-century British history, this is a useful, well-written account of the trials and tribulations of uniting the nations. Recommended for upper-level undergraduate and graduate libraries. R. E. Schreiber Indiana University South Bend
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Smyth does hugely valuable work filling out under understanding of British and Irish religion" English Historical Review "an excellent text to be read alongside Linda Colley's Britons " History
"Smyth does hugely valuable work filling out under understanding of British and Irish religion" English Historical Review "an excellent text to be read alongside Linda Colley's Britons" History
"Smyth does hugely valuable work filling out under understanding of British and Irish religion" English Historical Review "an excellent text to be read alongside Linda Colley'sBritons" History
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2002
Choice, July 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
The three kingdoms or 'four nations' which became the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in 1801 have distinct, but not separate, histories. Sensitive questions of religion, local loyalty, and allegiance to the state, shaped politics within and between the four nations - and still give an edge to politics in parts of modern Britain. In 1660, the restoration of Charles II to all three of his kingdoms, was followed by an attempt to impose religious uniformity across his kingdoms. It failed. The make-up of the British Isles was too diverse. Tories, Jacobites, radicals and Whigs each had strong links to a Church or religious faction. Politics and religion could intermingle dangerously. Fear of popery was a major cause of the revolution of 1688, and at the beginning of the eighteenth century Presbyterians led Scottish opposition to a union until they were recognised as an established church. At the end of the century the architects of the act of union with Ireland hoped, finally, to resolve the 'Catholic Question', but (as it does today) constitutional change brought issues of national identity to the fore. The eighteenth century witnessed the triumph of unionism on the larger island, and the rise of nationalism and separatism across the Irish sea. The Making of the United Kingdomseeks to explain that crucial divergence, and gives an incisive account of the forging of Britishness the sense of a new nation. Jim Smyth is Professor of History, University of Notre Dame.
Bowker Data Service Summary
On the 300th anniversary of the birth of the United Kingdom, this text gives a vital and hugely popular topical history of its component parts.
Long Description
The histories of the"three kingdoms" or "four nations" that eventually became the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in 1801 are distinct but not separate. From the Restoration of Charles II to the Act of Union with Ireland, Jim Smyth interweaves the different national stories into an authoritative account of the creation of the modern British state. Including discussion of society and economy alongside analysis of contemporary politics and the religious question, Smyth shows how the experiences of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland were shaped by unity as well as diversity. In an age of anxiety about national identity and the future of the United Kingdom, this is a timely and important book.
Main Description
The histories of the "three kingdoms" or "four nations" that eventually became the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in 1801 are distinct but not separate. From the Restoration of Charles II to the Act of Union with Ireland, Jim Smyth interweaves the different national stories into an authoritative account of the creation of the modern British state. Including discussion of society and economy alongside analysis of contemporary politics and the religious question, Smyth shows how the experiences of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland were shaped by unity as well as diversity. In an age of anxiety about national identity and the future of the United Kingdom, this is a timely and important book.
Main Description
The 'three kingdoms' or 'four nations' which became the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in 1801 have distinct, but not separate, histories. Sensitive questions of religion, local loyalty, and allegiance to the state, shaped politics within and between the four nations - and still give an edge to politics in parts of modern Britain.In 1660, the restoration of Charles II to all three of his kingdoms, was followed by an attempt to impose religious uniformity across his kingdoms. It failed. The make-up of the British Isles was too diverse. Tories, Jacobites, radicals and Whigs each had strong links to a Church or religious faction. Politics and religion could intermingle dangerously. Fear of popery was a major cause of the revolution of 1688, and at the beginning of the eighteenth century Presbyterians led Scottish opposition to a union until they were recognised as an established church. At the end of the century the architects of the act of union with Ireland hoped, finally, to resolve the 'Catholic Question', but (as it does today) constitutional change brought issues of national identity to the fore. The eighteenth century witnessed the triumph of unionism on the larger island, and the rise of nationalism and separatism across the Irish sea. The Making of the United Kingdom seeks to explain that crucial divergence, and gives an incisive account of the forging of Britishness the sense of a new nation.Jim Smyth is Professor of History, University of Notre Dame.
Table of Contents
Series Editor's Prefacep. vii
Introduction: the British problemp. xi
Acknowledgementsp. xvi
List of abbreviationsp. xvii
List of illustrationsp. xviii
Mapsp. xix
The Restoration: four nations in search of a kingp. 1
Three kingdoms, one Church?p. 19
The ecclesiastical settlement: England and Walesp. 23
Irelandp. 26
Scotlandp. 29
Disaffection and dissent: the heroic agep. 34
Quakersp. 35
'The Lord's people' and 'the Good Old Cause'p. 37
Covenantersp. 40
Protestant dissent in the reign of James II and VIIp. 49
The Catholic problemp. 61
Anti-popery and the Popish Plotp. 62
Catholic Ireland: revanche and defeatp. 65
Constitutional relations, national identities, unionp. 77
John Bull's other kingdoms during the Restorationp. 78
Anglo-Irish and Anglo-Scottish relations and the revolution settlementp. 87
The making of the unionp. 95
Jacobitism and the British statep. 108
The first phasep. 108
Riots, rebellion and conspiracy: the '15 and afterp. 116
Challenge and consolidation: the union, the House of Hanover and the '45p. 123
Convergence and divergence: identity formation and politics in the eighteenth centuryp. 135
Divergence: Irelandp. 136
Convergence: Scotlandp. 144
English nationalism, British empirep. 153
Britishness and empirep. 160
Catholics, Protestants and Dissenters: religion and politics in the eighteenth centuryp. 170
Orthodoxy: the Church of Englandp. 171
Heterodoxy, subscription and dissentp. 174
'Glad tidings of salvation': Methodism and revivalp. 183
The return of the Catholic Questionp. 186
Radicalism and reaction: the 1790sp. 194
Uniting the kingdoms: the British-Irish unionp. 205
The eighteenth-century discursive background to the unionp. 206
Crisis and union: 1790-1800p. 210
Afterwordp. 221
Appendixp. 226
Glossaryp. 231
Further Readingp. 233
Indexp. 236
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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