Catalogue


Count Marcellinus and his chronicle /
Brian Croke.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2001.
description
xvi, 300 p. : maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0198150016
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2001.
isbn
0198150016
catalogue key
4588289
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 266-283) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-06-01:
Though long an academic backwater, late antiquity has recently come into prominence with new publications of close analysis of texts, interpretive history, and encyclopedic works, like Late Antiquity, by G. Bowersock et al. (CH, Apr'00). Such foundation work prepares the way for broader studies of this important period. Croke's study of Marcellinus (which began as his Oxford thesis) is a valuable, though narrowly focused, contribution to the field. Croke (executive director, Catholic Education Commission, Sydney) has seen that this Illyrian nobleman's Chronicle (a continuation of Jerome's) is a valuable document for the culture of its time. His chapters reconstructing Marcellinus' life and on the Illyrian "military aristocracy" (including the emperors Justin and Justinian), the Illyrian community, (Latin-speaking and loyal to the Bishop of Rome, active in Constantinople), and the construction and purpose of the Chronicle provide new, solidly argued insights into the complexity of late imperial life. The last chapter, on the continuator of Marcellinus and the transmission of the text, is fascinating in its own right. Overall, an important contribution to the study of late antiquity, for graduate students and faculty. C. M. C. Green University of Iowa
Reviews
Review Quotes
A window into early sixth-century Constantinople ... an important and still inspiring interpretation, one that deserves to be read by everyone who reads or uses any late antique chronicle.
Croke has little difficulty in persuading us of the importance and interest of this text for our understanding of the Justinianic world.
"In this study of Count Marcellinus, a sixth-century Byzantine chronicler, Brian Croke makes a significant contribution to the early-medieval history of Byzantium and the Latin West. The book does far more than put a little known figure in the Justinianic ear on the map, providing nuanced interpretation of many aspects of Christian life, especially religious and imperical ceremonial at Constantinople. It also serves as a guide for investigating late-antique chronicles in general." --Speculum
'The detailed study of Marcellinus's reception and transmission over the subsequent centuries is thus a very welcome addition to the study of an intruguing text.'Early Medieval Europe
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2002
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title is a study of Marcellinus, a courtier of the emperor Justinian, and his chronicle covering the eastern Roman world from AD 379 to 534. It provides accounts of the Nika riots at Constantinople in 532, and other glimpses of life.
Long Description
Count Marcellinus and his Chronicle constitutes the first comprehensive study of Marcellinus, a courtier of the emperor Justinian, and his chronicle covering the eastern Roman world from AD 379 to 534. Marcellinus' chronicle provides a first-hand account of the Nika riots at Constantinople in 532, as well as other direct glimpses of political and religious life in the imperial capital in the early sixth century. It also testifies to the confrontations in the Balkans between the Romans and the Huns, Goths, and Bulgars. In this book Brian Croke develops a case for understanding Marcellinus' Latin chronicle as an essentially Byzantine document written by an educated imperial official and reflecting the cosmopolitan culture and society of sixth-century Constantinople. He approaches the chronicle as a historiographical text which is shaped by its genre, the expectations of its audience, and a coherent view of the past, deriving from the author's Christian culture and outlook. The book also explores the nature and function of chronicle writing as a distinct mode of Christian discourse which has been misunderstood and undervalued by modern scholarship. Separate attention is given to the anonymous continuation of the chronicle from 535 to 548, and to the subsequent use of Marcellinus' works in Ireland and Anglo-Saxon England. Croke also casts new light on the career of Marcellinus, his range of literary output which included books on topography and chronology, and the course and impact of the fifth- and sixth-century raids into Roman Illyricum. This book also enriches our understanding of society and politics in the imperial capital and raises broader questions about Christian life, liturgy, and culture in the sixth century, particularly the central role of imperial and religious ceremonial in Byzantine public life.
Main Description
'A window into early sixth-century Constantinople... an important and still inspiring interpretation, one that deserves to be read by everyone who reads or uses any late antique chronicle.' -Journal of Roman StudiesMarcellinus abandoned his Balkan homeland in the wake of Bulgar raids around AD 500. Having settled in the imperial capital, Constantinople, he later wrote a chronicle covering the period AD 379-534. This is the first extensive study of Marcellinus, a courtier of the emperor Justinian, and his chronicle. It explains how the chronicle reflects Marcellinus' career, contemporary context and personal views; what writing a chronicle meant; how the chronicle was written; and how it was later used in Ireland and Anglo-Saxon England.
Main Description
Count Marcellinus and his Chronicle constitutes the first comprehensive study of Marcellinus, a courtier of the emperor Justinian, and his chronicle covering the eastern Roman world from AD 379 to 534. Brian Croke casts new light on the career of Marcellinus and develops a case for understanding his Latin chronicle as an essentially Byzantine document written by an educated imperial official. This book also enriches our understanding of society and politics in the imperial capital and raises broader questions about Christian life, liturgy, and culture in the sixth century, particularly the central role of imperial and religious ceremonial in Byzantine public life.
Main Description
Count Marcellinus and his Chronicle constitutes the first comprehensive study of Marcellinus, a courtier of the emperor Justinian, and his chronicle covering the eastern Roman world from AD 379 to 534. Marcellinus' chronicle provides a first-hand account of the Nika riots at Constantinople in532, as well as other direct glimpses of political and religious life in the imperial capital in the early sixth century. It also testifies to the confrontations in the Balkans between the Romans and the Huns, Goths, and Bulgars. In this book Brian Croke develops a case for understanding Marcellinus' Latin chronicle as an essentially Byzantine document written by an educated imperial official and reflecting the cosmopolitan culture and society of sixth-century Constantinople. He approaches the chronicle as ahistoriographical text which is shaped by its genre, the expectations of its audience, and a coherent view of the past, deriving from the author's Christian culture and outlook. The book also explores the nature and function of chronicle writing as a distinct mode of Christian discourse which hasbeen misunderstood and undervalued by modern scholarship. Separate attention is given to the anonymous continuation of the chronicle from 535 to 548, and to the subsequent use of Marcellinus' works in Ireland and Anglo-Saxon England. Croke also casts new light on the career of Marcellinus, his range of literary output which included books on topography and chronology, and the course and impact of the fifth- and sixth-century raids into Roman Illyricum. This book also enriches our understanding of society and politics in theimperial capital and raises broader questions about Christian life, liturgy, and culture in the sixth century, particularly the central role of imperial and religious ceremonial in Byzantine public life.
Table of Contents
Maps
Abbreviations
Introduction: Analysing Chroniclesp. 1
The World of Marcellinus
Marcellinus Comes: The Man and his Workp. 17
Marcellinus and Illyricump. 48
Illyrians at Constantinoplep. 78
Marcellinus and Constantinoplep. 103
The Chronicle and its Transmission
Chronicle Writing in Late Antiquityp. 145
Constructing the Chroniclep. 170
The Continuator of Marcellinusp. 216
The Chronicle's Afterlifep. 237
Conclusion: Chronicles and Christian Culturep. 257
Bibliographyp. 266
Indexp. 284
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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