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Creating the innovation culture : leveraging visionaries, dissenters and other useful troublemakers in your organization /
Frances Horibe.
imprint
Toronto ; New York : J. Wiley & Sons, 2001.
description
x, 258 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0471646288
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto ; New York : J. Wiley & Sons, 2001.
isbn
0471646288
catalogue key
4588217
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Leaders the world over would have no trouble agreeing that innovation is the single most important criterion for business success in the future. Organizations need to innovate to survive, and they know it. So why do most companies have such a dismal track record of trying to harness creativity? While innovation is desperately needed to survive in the new economy. It doesn't necessarily fit well into traditional organizational cultures. Much as organizations often say they want and need innovation, they often reject it when it comes. In fact, some unintentionally kill it. They hire creative people and then prevent them from using their skills. Encouraging true innovation is hard because, by definition, innovation is about different ideas that challenge traditional assumptions and ways of doing business. And, too often, being different is perceived as dissent, which leads to conflict. Dissenters of any kind are generally unwelcome. They can be difficult to deal with, single-minded, and politically naiuml; ve. But they also bring new ideas from the very fringes of the organization, and shake up the tried and true ways of doing business, sending ripples throughout the firm. They are the "wild ducks" in the organization, because they won't fly in formation. While this can be an exciting source of innovation, it can also cause many problems for managers who have to manage other people and processes. But dissenters are also an organization's greatest resource in the information economy. Creating the Innovation Culture gives managers at all levels practical strategies and hands-on advice for encouraging and managing innovation and dissent, while avoiding too much conflict, which can paralyze the organization. Identifies the four main things managers need to do to encourage dissent and, therefore, innovation in their organizations. Illustrates the many ways in which managers and organizations stifle dissent- even the positive things that can inhibit it. Explains how to recognize when healthy dissent crosses the line and becomes undesirable conflict. Outlines the role of the middle manager as a broker of opportunities for innovation and collaboration. Shows managers how to identify and coach dissenters, and act as their "political handler" in getting their ideas accepted in the company. Deals with processes and mechanisms that support and sustain innovation. Includes numerous examples, sample dialogues, end-of-chapter summaries, and an "Underground Dissent Quiz." Creating the Innovation Culture is not about suppressing conflict, but about how to surface, increase, and manage the level of healthy dissent. It's about how to foster an environment where innovation occurs because of the culture, not in spite of it.
Flap Copy
Leaders the world over would have no trouble agreeing that innovation is the single most important criterion for business success in the future. Organizations need to innovate to survive, and they know it. So why do most companies have such a dismal track record of trying to harness creativity?While innovation is desperately needed to survive in the new economy. It doesn't necessarily fit well into traditional organizational cultures. Much as organizations often say they want and need innovation, they often reject it when it comes. In fact, some unintentionally kill it. They hire creative people and then prevent them from using their skills.Encouraging true innovation is hard because, by definition, innovation is about different ideas that challenge traditional assumptions and ways of doing business. And, too often, being different is perceived as dissent, which leads to conflict.Dissenters of any kind are generally unwelcome. They can be difficult to deal with, single-minded, and politically naiuml; ve. But they also bring new ideas from the very fringes of the organization, and shake up the tried and true ways of doing business, sending ripples throughout the firm. They are the "wild ducks" in the organization, because they won't fly in formation. While this can be an exciting source of innovation, it can also cause many problems for managers who have to manage other people and processes. But dissenters are also an organization's greatest resource in the information economy.Creating the Innovation Culture gives managers at all levels practical strategies and hands-on advice for encouraging and managing innovation and dissent, while avoiding too much conflict, which can paralyze the organization. Identifies the four main things managers need to do to encourage dissent and, therefore, innovation in their organizations. Illustrates the many ways in which managers and organizations stifle dissent- even the positive things that can inhibit it. Explains how to recognize when healthy dissent crosses the line and becomes undesirable conflict. Outlines the role of the middle manager as a broker of opportunities for innovation and collaboration. Shows managers how to identify and coach dissenters, and act as their "political handler" in getting their ideas accepted in the company. Deals with processes and mechanisms that support and sustain innovation. Includes numerous examples, sample dialogues, end-of-chapter summaries, and an "Underground Dissent Quiz." Creating the Innovation Culture is not about suppressing conflict, but about how to surface, increase, and manage the level of healthy dissent. It's about how to foster an environment where innovation occurs because of the culture, not in spite of it.
Flap Copy
Leaders the world over would have no trouble agreeing that innovation is the single most important criterion for business success in the future. Organizations need to innovate to survive, and they know it. So why do most companies have such a dismal track record of trying to harness creativity? While innovation is desperately needed to survive in the new economy. It doesn't necessarily fit well into traditional organizational cultures. Much as organizations often say they want and need innovation, they often reject it when it comes. In fact, some unintentionally kill it. They hire creative people and then prevent them from using their skills. Encouraging true innovation is hard because, by definition, innovation is about different ideas that challenge traditional assumptions and ways of doing business. And, too often, being different is perceived as dissent, which leads to conflict. Dissenters of any kind are generally unwelcome. They can be difficult to deal with, single-minded, and politically na ve. But they also bring new ideas from the very fringes of the organization, and shake up the tried and true ways of doing business, sending ripples throughout the firm. They are the "wild ducks" in the organization, because they won't fly in formation. While this can be an exciting source of innovation, it can also cause many problems for managers who have to manage other people and processes. But dissenters are also an organization's greatest resource in the information economy. Creating the Innovation Culture gives managers at all levels practical strategies and hands-on advice for encouraging and managing innovation and dissent, while avoiding too much conflict, which can paralyze the organization. Identifies the four main things managers need to do to encourage dissent and, therefore, innovation in their organizations. Illustrates the many ways in which managers and organizations stifle dissent- even the positive things that can inhibit it. Explains how to recognize when healthy dissent crosses the line and becomes undesirable conflict. Outlines the role of the middle manager as a broker of opportunities for innovation and collaboration. Shows managers how to identify and coach dissenters, and act as their "political handler" in getting their ideas accepted in the company. Deals with processes and mechanisms that support and sustain innovation. Includes numerous examples, sample dialogues, end-of-chapter summaries, and an "Underground Dissent Quiz." Creating the Innovation Culture is not about suppressing conflict, but about how to surface, increase, and manage the level of healthy dissent. It's about how to foster an environment where innovation occurs because of the culture, not in spite of it.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-12-01:
Horibe, consultant and author of several management books, describes strategies and techniques for managing and encouraging dissent and innovation in organizations. Organizations have developed complicated mechanisms to squash dissenters. According to the author, managers should welcome healthy dissent that provides honest opinions of organizational direction. To encourage healthy dissent, managers should train and reward risk takers, provide autonomy and mobility for dissenters, and model risk taking themselves. However, dissenters who are underground, abusive, or belittling to others might need to be coached or terminated. Coaching requires identifying the exact problem, specifying the desired change, anticipating defensive reactions, and deciding how hard to push. Horibe describes how to recognize differences between healthy dissent and undesirable conflict while sustaining innovation. She also includes sample dialogues, end-of-chapter summaries, an organizational dissent quiz, and a few examples of corporate experiences from the management literature. Alan Robinson's Corporate Creativity: How Innovation and Improvement Actually Happen (CH, Feb'98) provides similar management-oriented information but with less focus on dissent. Recommended for corporate practitioners and undergraduate students. G. E. Kaupins Boise State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"..This is a book which every conventional manager should read." (Modern Management, February 2002)
"..This is a book which every conventional manager should read." (Modern Management, February 2002) "Frances Horibe's insightful narrative is both thought-provoking and entertaining. Creating the Innovation Culture is a vital part of any library- especially for those of us who toil daily to harness and encourage creativity. In business today, innovation is everything. This book is an exploration of the delicate balance between innovation and dissidence." - Derek Burney, President and CEO, Corel Corporation "It was George Bernard Shaw who once remarked with undeniable logic that all progress has to depend on the 'unreasonable man' because they are the ones who don't adapt to the world as it is. This, or course, makes perfect sense, but only up to the point where one is faced with having to deal with the reality of it in an organization. "Whether you're one of the dissenters, someone managing dissent, or merely an observer, there's something in Creating the Innovation Culture for everyone- an understanding of dissent and innovation, advice, new ideas, and a hint of the consequences if we don't learn to deal with those 'unreasonable men.'" - David Carlson, Vice President, Americas, Quality & Customer Relations, Alcatel "In this lively, well written book, Horibe helps us realize that we need to get comfortable with being uncomfortable. She wisely points out that great leaders seek out and encourage people who will challenge them and their rules. This book is full of great tips on how to be this type of leader so you, too, can help innovation flourish in your organization." - Susan Robinson, Senior Vice President, Human Resources, Manulife Financial " Creating the Innovation Culture shows us how to manage the most creative behaviour in an organization- dissent. It accurately and effectively describes why the need for dissent is so important to stimulate innovation that we must promote, support, and manage dissent if our businesses today are going to survive and flourish." - Geoff Smith, Vice President, Business Development, Mitel
"Frances Horibe's insightful narrative is both thought-provoking and entertaining. Creating the Innovation Culture is a vital part of any library- especially for those of us who toil daily to harness and encourage creativity. In business today, innovation is everything. This book is an exploration of the delicate balance between innovation and dissidence." - Derek Burney, President and CEO, Corel Corporation "It was George Bernard Shaw who once remarked with undeniable logic that all progress has to depend on the 'unreasonable man' because they are the ones who don't adapt to the world as it is. This, or course, makes perfect sense, but only up to the point where one is faced with having to deal with the reality of it in an organization. "Whether you're one of the dissenters, someone managing dissent, or merely an observer, there's something in Creating the Innovation Culture for everyone- an understanding of dissent and innovation, advice, new ideas, and a hint of the consequences if we don't learn to deal with those 'unreasonable men.'" - David Carlson, Vice President, Americas, Quality & Customer Relations, Alcatel "In this lively, well written book, Horibe helps us realize that we need to get comfortable with being uncomfortable. She wisely points out that great leaders seek out and encourage people who will challenge them and their rules. This book is full of great tips on how to be this type of leader so you, too, can help innovation flourish in your organization." - Susan Robinson, Senior Vice President, Human Resources, Manulife Financial "Creating the Innovation Culture shows us how to manage the most creative behaviour in an organization- dissent. It accurately and effectively describes why the need for dissent is so important to stimulate innovation that we must promote, support, and manage dissent if our businesses today are going to survive and flourish." - Geoff Smith, Vice President, Business Development, Mitel
"Frances Horibe's insightful narrative is both thought-provoking and entertaining. Creating the Innovation Culture is a vital part of any library- especially for those of us who toil daily to harness and encourage creativity. In business today, innovation is everything. This book is an exploration of the delicate balance between innovation and dissidence." - Derek Burney, President and CEO, Corel Corporation "It was George Bernard Shaw who once remarked with undeniable logic that all progress has to depend on the 'unreasonable man' because they are the ones who don't adapt to the world as it is. This, or course, makes perfect sense, but only up to the point where one is faced with having to deal with the reality of it in an organization. "Whether you're one of the dissenters, someone managing dissent, or merely an observer, there's something in Creating the Innovation Culture for everyone- an understanding of dissent and innovation, advice, new ideas, and a hint of the consequences if we don't learn to deal with those 'unreasonable men.'" - David Carlson, Vice President, Americas, Quality & Customer Relations, Alcatel "In this lively, well written book, Horibe helps us realize that we need to get comfortable with being uncomfortable. She wisely points out that great leaders seek out and encourage people who will challenge them and their rules. This book is full of great tips on how to be this type of leader so you, too, can help innovation flourish in your organization." - Susan Robinson, Senior Vice President, Human Resources, Manulife Financial " Creating the Innovation Culture shows us how to manage the most creative behaviour in an organization- dissent. It accurately and effectively describes why the need for dissent is so important to stimulate innovation that we must promote, support, and manage dissent if our businesses today are going to survive and flourish." - Geoff Smith, Vice President, Business Development, Mitel
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2001
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Summaries
Main Description
Why dissenters can be an organization2s most valuable asset and how to transform dissent into innovation Innovation is essential to competitive survival in today2s global marketplace. But in the majority of traditional organizations, innovators are perceived as counter-productive dissenters, single-minded troublemakers who are difficult to manage and politically naive. Written by a leading international expert on change management, this groundbreaking book explores the vital link between the need for innovation in the e-business world and the new role of dissenters as agents for constructive change. With the help of numerous case examples and anecdotes, Frances Horibe helps managers appreciate the value that dissent can bring to an organization, and she provides proven strategies and hands-on advice on how to encourage innovation and manage creative dissent, while avoiding paralyzing conflicts. Readers learn about the new role of managers as political handlers who help develop and support new ideas and sell them to senior management, and much more.
Main Description
Why dissenters can be an organization's most valuable asset and how to transform dissent into innovation Innovation is essential to competitive survival in today's global marketplace. But in the majority of traditional organizations, innovators are perceived as counter-productive dissenters, single-minded troublemakers who are difficult to manage and politically naive. Written by a leading international expert on change management, this groundbreaking book explores the vital link between the need for innovation in the e-business world and the new role of dissenters as agents for constructive change. With the help of numerous case examples and anecdotes, Frances Horibe helps managers appreciate the value that dissent can bring to an organization, and she provides proven strategies and hands-on advice on how to encourage innovation and manage creative dissent, while avoiding paralyzing conflicts. Readers learn about the new role of managers as political handlers who help develop and support new ideas and sell them to senior management, and much more.
Unpaid Annotation
With the advent of the Internet and the general speeding up of the information economy, innovation is essential--not simply to get new products to market, but also to fundamentally rethink how business is done. But encouraging true innovation is difficult. By definition, innovation is about different ideas that challenge traditional assumptions and ways of doing business. And, too often, being different is perceived as dissent, which leads to conflict. Too often, innovators seem like troublemakers, bringing new ideas from the very fringes of the organization. While innovation of all kinds is desperately needed to survive in the new economy, it doesn't necessarily fit well into traditional organizational cultures. Dissenters of any kind are typically unwelcome in organizations. They can be difficult to deal with, single-minded, and politically nave. But they are also an organization's greatest resource in the new world of e-business. This book will help managers to appreciate the value that dissent brings to,an organization, and also to manage dissenters who, while essential, can be difficult fits in most organizations.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. xi
The Need for Innovationp. 1
The Need for Innovationp. 1
About This Bookp. 6
Summaryp. 7
Main Pointsp. 7
The Efficiency-Innovation Dichotomyp. 9
Innovation: Fantasy and Factp. 9
The Drive for Efficiencyp. 12
Ways Around this Dilemmap. 19
Summaryp. 20
Main Pointsp. 21
The Need for Dissentp. 23
Resisting Innovationp. 23
Speak Truth to Powerp. 24
Honoring Those Who Speak Truth to Powerp. 25
Managing Conflict and Managing Dissentp. 29
Won't All This Dissent Run Amok?p. 33
Summaryp. 34
Main Pointsp. 34
The Nature of Dissent in Organizationsp. 35
Introductionp. 35
Stages of Suppressing Dissentp. 36
Consent and Dissentp. 39
A Dissent Continuump. 42
Good Dissent and Badp. 47
Your Task in Supporting Dissentp. 50
Summaryp. 50
Main Pointsp. 51
Ways You'd Never Suppress Dissent--Would you?p. 53
Introductionp. 53
Shoot the Messengerp. 54
Send Mixed Messagesp. 56
Never Apologize (Never Be Wrong)p. 60
Play Politicsp. 64
Intimidatep. 68
Summaryp. 70
Main Pointsp. 70
Surprising Ways to Suppress Dissentp. 73
Introductionp. 73
The Dangers of Best Practicesp. 73
The Downsides of Treating Everybody Equallyp. 75
The Drawbacks of People with Your Valuesp. 78
The Pitfalls of Designing a Process to Capture Good Ideasp. 84
Summaryp. 85
Main Pointsp. 86
Who are Dissenters?p. 87
The Role of the Dissenterp. 87
A Package Dealp. 90
The Urge to Tame Wild Ducksp. 91
All That Glitters In Not Gold: How to Differentiate Between Dissent and Undesirable Behaviorsp. 93
Summaryp. 96
Main Pointsp. 97
Manager as Political Handlerp. 99
A Cautionary Talep. 99
Manager as Political Handlerp. 100
Gathering Supportp. 102
Providing Air Coverp. 104
Taking and Getting Creditp. 107
Managing Expectationsp. 109
Getting Cooperation without Co-optingp. 111
Holding onto Innovatorsp. 117
Summaryp. 120
Main Pointsp. 120
Coaching Dissentersp. 121
Introductionp. 121
Two Problemsp. 121
Preparation for Coachingp. 124
Coaching the Dissenterp. 129
Another Examplep. 136
Summaryp. 140
Main Pointsp. 140
Identifying Underground Dissentp. 141
Is Silence Consent?p. 141
The Three Faces of Underground Dissentp. 142
Why Does Dissent Go Underground?p. 145
Summaryp. 152
Main Pointsp. 152
Surfacing Dissent In and Around Youp. 153
Changing the Culturep. 153
Surfacing Dissent with Yourselfp. 155
Surfacing Dissent with Your Colleaguesp. 158
Conflict and Dissent: A Reprisep. 163
Surfacing Dissent with Your Employeesp. 164
Summaryp. 175
Main Pointsp. 175
Surfacing Dissent above Youp. 177
Surfacing Dissent with Your Bossp. 177
Summaryp. 190
Main Pointsp. 190
Kickstarting Your Innovation Culturep. 191
Making Changep. 191
The Innovation Manager and Her Unitp. 193
Summaryp. 200
Main Pointsp. 200
Structures and Mechanisms for Dissentp. 201
Making Innovation Happenp. 201
Encouraging a Greater Capacity for Riskp. 202
Demonstrating That You're Not Always Rightp. 206
Not Punishing Failurep. 210
Summaryp. 212
Main Pointsp. 212
Encouraging Continued Dissentp. 215
Introductionp. 215
Speak Lastp. 216
Seak Out Dissenting Viewsp. 217
Out-of-control Discussionp. 221
Protect Dissentersp. 223
Help Would-be Dissenters Speak Upp. 225
Challenge Your Group's Status Quop. 228
Summaryp. 231
Main Pointsp. 232
Knowing when Enough is Enoughp. 233
The Hard and Soft Side of Managementp. 233
How Do You Know When to Let a Dissenter Go?p. 233
Involving Legal and HRp. 235
Whistle-blowers--Potential and Actualp. 236
Handling Termination Rightp. 237
Reactions of Other Employeesp. 239
Summaryp. 242
Main Pointsp. 243
Conclusionp. 245
The Paradox of Our Timesp. 245
So Where To from Here?p. 247
Main Pointsp. 251
Indexp. 253
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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