Catalogue


The annotated Huckleberry Finn : Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's comrade) /
by Mark Twain (Samuel L. Clemens) ; edited with an introduction, notes, and bibliography by Michael Patrick Hearn ; illustrated by E. W. Kemble .
imprint
New York : Norton, c2001.
description
clxv, 480 p. : ill. (some col.).
ISBN
0393020398
format(s)
Book
Holdings
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Born Samuel Langhorne Clemens on November 30, 1835, in Florida, Missouri, Mark Twain is one of the most important figures in world literature. Known for his comic wit, his courageous social satire, and his extraordinary depiction of American small-town life, Twain has become a cornerstone of American culture. Michael Patrick Hearn has written for the New York Times, The Nation, and other publications. His many books include Myth, Magic and Mystery and the best-selling The Annotated Wizard of Oz.
First Chapter


Chapter One

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Youdon't know about me, without you have read a book by the name of "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer," but that ain't no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is nothing. I never seen anybody but lied, one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Aunt Polly--Tom's Aunt Polly, she is--and Mary, and the Widow Douglas, is all told about in that book--which is mostly a true book; with some stretchers, as I said before.

    Now the way that the book winds up, is this: Tom and me found the money that the robbers hid in the cave, and it made us rich. We got six thousand dollars apiece--all gold. It was an awful sight of money when it was piled up. Well, Judge Thatcher, he took it and put it out at interest, and it fetched us a dollar a day apiece, all the year round--more than a body could tell what to do with. The Widow Douglas, she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me; but it was rough living in the house all the time, considering how dismal regular and decent the widow was in all her ways; and so when I couldn't stand it no longer, I lit out. I got into my old rags, and my sugar-hogshead again, and was free and satisfied. But Tom Sawyer, he hunted me up and said he was going to start a band of robbers, and I might join if I would go back to the widow and be respectable. So I went back.

    The widow she cried over me, and called me a poor lost lamb, and she called me a lot of other names, too, but she never meant no harm by it. She put me in them new clothes again, and I couldn't do nothing but sweat and sweat, and feel all cramped up. Well, then, the old thing commenced again. The widow rung a bell for supper, and you had to come to time. When you got to the table you couldn't go right to eating, but you had to wait for the widow to tuck down her head and grumble a little over the victuals, though there warn't really anything the matter with them. That is, nothing only everything was cooked by itself. In a barrel of odds and ends it is different; things get mixed up, and the juice kind of swaps around, and the things go better.

    After supper she got out her book and learned me about Moses and the Bulrushers; and I was in a sweat to find out all about him; but by-and-by she let it out that Moses had been dead a considerable long time; so then I didn't care no more about him; because I don't take no stock in dead people.

    Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let me. But she wouldn't. She said it was a mean practice and wasn't clean, and I must try to not do it any more. That is just the way with some people. They get down on a thing when they don't know nothing about it. Here she was a bothering about Moses, which was no kin to her, and no use to anybody, being gone, you see, yet finding a power of fault with me for doing a thing that had some good in it. And she took snuff too; of course that was all right, because she done it herself.

    Her sister, Miss Watson, a tolerable slim old maid, with goggles on, had just come to live with her, and took a set at me now, with a spelling-book. She worked me middling hard for about an hour, and then the widow made her ease up. I couldn't stood it much longer. Then for an hour it was deadly dull, and I was fidgety. Miss Watson would say, "Don't put your feet up there, Huckleberry;" and "don't scrunch up like that, Huckleberry--set up straight;" and pretty soon she would say, "Don't gap and stretch like that, Huckleberry--why don't you try to behave?" Then she told me all about the bad place, and I said I wished I was there. She got mad, then, but I didn't mean no harm. All I wanted was to go somewheres; all I wanted was a change, I warn't particular. She said it was wicked to say what I said; said she wouldn't say it for the whole world; she was going to live so as to go to the good place. Well, I couldn't see no advantage in going where she was going, so I made up my mind I wouldn't try for it. But I never said so, because it would only make trouble, and wouldn't do no good.

    Now she had got a start, and she went on and told me all about the good place. She said all a body would have to do there was to go around all day long with a harp and sing, forever and ever. So I didn't think much of it. But I never said so. I asked her if she reckoned Tom Sawyer would go there, and, she said, not by a considerable sight. I was glad about that, because I wanted him and me to be together.

    Miss Watson she kept pecking at me, and it got tiresome and lonesome. By-and-by they fetched the niggers in and had prayers, and then everybody was off to bed. I went up to my room with a piece of candle and put it on the table. Then I set down in a chair by the window and tried to think of something cheerful, but it warn't no use. I felt so lonesome I most wished I was dead. The stars was shining, and the leaves rustled in the woods ever so mournful; and I heard an owl, away off, who-whooing about somebody that was dead, and a whippowill and a dog crying about somebody that was going to die; and the wind was trying to whisper something to me and I couldn't make out what it was, and so it made the cold shivers run over me. Then away out in the woods I heard that kind of a sound that a ghost makes when it wants to tell about something that's on its mind and can't make itself understood, and so can't rest easy in its grave and has to go about that way every night grieving. I got so down-hearted and scared, I did wish I had some company. Pretty soon a spider went crawling up my shoulder, and I flipped it off and it lit in the candle; and before I could budge it was all shriveled up. I didn't need anybody to tell me that that was an awful bad sign and would fetch me some bad luck, so I was scared and most shook the clothes off of me. I got up and turned around in my tracks three times and crossed my breast every time; and then I tied up a little lock of my hair with a thread to keep witches away. But I hadn't no confidence. You do that when you've lost a horse-shoe that you've found, instead of nailing it up over the door, but I hadn't ever heard anybody say it was any way to keep off bad luck when you'd killed a spider.

    I set down again, a shaking all over, and got out my pipe for a smoke; for the house was all as still as death, now, and so the widow wouldn't know. Well, after a long time I heard the clock away off in the town go boom--boom--boom--twelve licks--and all still again--stiller than ever. Pretty soon I heard a twig snap, down in the dark amongst the trees--something was a stirring. I set still and listened. Directly I could just barely hear a " me-yow! me-yow! " down there. That was good! Says I, " me-yow! me-yow! " as soft as I could, and then I put out the light and scrambled out of the window onto the shed. Then I slipped down to the ground and crawled in amongst the trees, and sure enough there was Tom Sawyer waiting for me.

Excerpted from The Annotated Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. Copyright © 2001 by Michael Patrick Hearn. Excerpted by permission. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2001-09-10:
Hearn, who edited The Wizard of Oz for Norton's Annotated series, has taken on that formative fiction of American culture, Huckleberry Finn a seemingly transparent work that, as presented in Hearn's exhaustive research, harbors linguistic complexities worthy of an Eliot or a Joyce. In his long introduction, Hearn chronicles Huck's publishing history, from its on-again, off-again composition, to Twain's stormy relationship with his publishers, to the book's embattled trip to the printer (trailing censorious editors in its wake) and its instant success on the market. Hearn offers a thorough cataloguing of the book's critical reception and many controversies, an ample pinch of biography, a lengthy analysis of dialect and a fairly sketchy historical background. The notes themselves (presented alongside the text) are eclectic, sometimes charmingly so: we learn what a huckleberry is, and a sugar-hogshead, and how corn pone is made. Huck's vast repertory of Southern superstitions is carefully glossed, and Hearn wisely includes quotes about the book from Twain (who could scarcely open his mouth without saying something funny) whenever possible. The notes go overboard in their extensive translation of the book's idiomatic speech (readers probably don't need "powwow" defined and can figure out for themselves that "hoss" means horse). On the whole, Hearn supplies interesting information with a light touch possibly too light in the last third of the book, which seems more thinly annotated than the beginning. Restored passages not seen in the original appear in the appendices. Though a stronger anchor in cultural history could have made this volume better, this liberally illustrated and beautifully designed book offers many pleasures for the general reader. (Oct.) Forecast: This is the perfect gift book for all of Huck's fans and should sell very well with the aid of a six-city author tour and national media appearances. Also, in January 2002, a Ken Burns series on Twain will air. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 2001-06-15:
Having given us The Annotated Wizard of Oz, Michael Patrick Hearn illuminates another American favorite. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2002-02-01:
Somewhere between a coffee-table extravaganza and a scholarly edition, Hearn's addition to the literature on Twain's masterpiece is often engaging, occasionally overzealous in annotations, but, finally, a very good fulfillment of its overall objective. Hearn uses the text in the 1996 Random House corrected edition, taking advantage of the 1990 discovery of the first half of Twain's manuscript. In places the annotations overwhelm the text for pages at a time; a few of the critical or linguistic notes are unnecessary, but the majority are accurate and a potential boon to nonspecialists. A long (165 page) and engaging preface covers composition, illustration, publication, reception, background, influence, and current arguments over the text's "racism"--a wide-ranging discussion that covers the culture surrounding the book including its appearance as a play in 1902. The discussion is consistently clear, intelligent, deft, and illuminating; Hearn uses a range of historical and scholarly sources and provides a balanced interpretation of how Twain felt about and used his own work. Illustrations are fresh in both the preface and the annotation columns, adding value to the text. A good addition even for libraries that already own multiple copies of the basic text, this volume will serve readers at all levels. D. E. Sloane University of New Haven
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, June 2001
Publishers Weekly, September 2001
Washington Post, September 2001
Choice, February 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
A sumptuous new edition of the great American novel. "All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn ," Ernest Hemingway once declared. First published in 1885, the book has delighted millions of readers, while simultaneously riling contemporary sensibilities, and is still banned in many schools and libraries. Now, Michael Patrick Hearn, author of the best-selling The Annotated Wizard of Oz , thoroughly reexamines the 116-year heritage of that archetypal American boy, Huck Finn, and follows his adventures along every bend of the mighty Mississippi River. Hearn's copious annotations draw on primary sources including the original manuscript, Twain's revisions and letters, and period accounts. Reproducing the original E. W. Kemble illustrations from the first edition, as well as countless archival photographs and drawings, some of them previously unpublished, The Annotated Huckleberry Finn is a book no family's library can do without; it may well prove to be the classic edition of the great American novel. 274 illustrations, two-color throughout.
Main Description
"All modern American literature comes from one book called Huckleberry Finn," declared Ernest Hemingway. "There was nothing before. There has been nothing good since." Yet even from the time of its first publication in 1885, Mark Twain's masterpiece has been one of the most celebrated and controversial books ever published in America. No other story so central to our American identity has been so loved and so reviled as Huck Finn's autobiography. Michael Patrick Hearn, author of the national bestseller The Annotated Wizard of Oz, has done equal justice to this great American novel. A Twain literary sleuth and an authority on children's literature, he considers all the literary, social, historical, and autobiographical aspects of Twain's classic tale of Huck and Jim's trip down the mighty Mississippi. In lively and fascinating annotations, Hearn's notes draw on everything from letters, manuscripts, and contemporary newspapers to the author's own frequent revisions and notes, various critical responses to the publication, and much previously unpublished material. The substantial introduction is, in essence, a mini-biography of a book and a man whose real name was Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835-1910), and it recounts the novel's remarkably prickly history, resulting in it being banned perhaps more than any other work in American history. In this new edition, the characters of Hannibal, Missouri, come vividly alive, as if Hearn was steering the raft itself. We encounter, among others, the kind Widow Douglas; the dreaded Miss Watson; the enlightened runaway slave Jim, whom Huck meets on Jackson's Island; an endless parade of bandits, slaveowners, and sheer opportunists; as well as Tom Sawyer and Aunt Sally, whose desire to adopt and "sivilize" Huck propels him to flee to the American West. Likewise, the Mississippi River "emerges as a living force regardless of the vain attempts of men to tame it." Hearn, by illustrating literary and historical themes that we never knew before, demonstrates that Huckleberry Finn did more than merely redefine the "bad-boy's book"; it galvanized and transformed world literature. This handsomely designed volume, crafted by award-winning book designer Jo Anne Metsch, presents the novel as Mark Twain wrote it, illustrated with all 175 original illustrations by E. W. Kemble in sepia. These are supplemented by rare photographs, drawings, prints, cartoons, maps, the suppressed "obscene" plate, and other Kemble designs, some previously unpublished'll of which are wonderfully integrated with the text to bring out the intricacies of Twain's enchanting work. The Annotated Huckleberry Finn is a landmark edition of an American classic that will further insure Twain's importance for generations to come.
Main Description
"All modern American literature comes from one book called Huckleberry Finn," declared Ernest Hemingway. "There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since." Yet even from the time of its first publication in 1885, Mark Twain's masterpiece has been one of the most celebrated and controversial books ever published in America. No other story so central to our American identity has been so loved and so reviled as Huck Finn's autobiography.
Main Description
"All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn ," Ernest Hemingway once declared. First published in 1885, the book has delighted millions of readers, while simultaneously riling contemporary sensibilities, and is still banned in many schools and libraries. Now, Michael Patrick Hearn, author of the best-selling The Annotated Wizard of Oz , thoroughly reexamines the 116-year heritage of that archetypal American boy, Huck Finn, and follows his adventures along every bend of the mighty Mississippi River. Hearn's copious annotations draw on primary sources including the original manuscript, Twain's revisions and letters, and period accounts. Reproducing the original E. W. Kemble illustrations from the first edition, as well as countless archival photographs and drawings, some of them previously unpublished, The Annotated Huckleberry Finn is a book no family's library can do without; it may well prove to be the classic edition of the great American novel.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Michael Patrick Hearn re-examines the 116-year heritage of that archetypal American schoolboy, Huck Finn, and follows his adventures along every bend of the Mississippi.
Table of Contents
Introduction to The Annotated Huckleberry Finnp. xiii
Adventures of Huckleberry Finnp. 1
p. 9
Civilizing Huck
Miss Watson
Tom Sawyer Waits
p. 9
The Boys Escape Jim
Tom Sawyer's Gang
Deep-laid Plans
p. 27
A Good Going-over
Grace Triumphant
"One of Tom Sawyer's Lies"
p. 47
Huck and the Judge
Superstition
p. 53
Huck's Father
The Fond Parent
Reform
p. 59
He Went for Judge Thatcher
Huck Decides to Leave
Political Economy
Thrashing Around
p. 71
Laying for Him
Locked in the Cabin
Sinking the Body
Resting
p. 79
Sleeping in the Woods
Raising the Dead
Exploring the Island
Finding Jim
Jim's Escape
Signs
"Balum"
p. 97
The Cave
The Floating House
p. 104
The Find
Old Hank Bunker
In Disguise
p. 110
Huck and the Woman
The Search
Prevarication
Going to Goshen
p. 120
Slow Navigation
Borrowing Things
Boarding the Wreck
The Plotters
Hunting for the Boat
p. 130
Escaping from the Wreck
The Watchman
Sinking
p. 137
A General Good Time
The Harem
French
p. 144
Huck Loses the Raft
In the Fog
Huck Finds the Raft
Trash
p. 152
Expectations
A White Lie
Floating Currency
Running by Cairo
Swimming Ashore
p. 165
An Evening Call
The Farm in Arkansaw
Interior Decorations
Stephen Dowling Bots
Poetical Effusions
p. 183
Col. Grangerford
Aristocracy
Feuds
The Testament
Recovering the Raft
The Woodpile
Pork and Cabbage
p. 201
Tying Up Day-times
An Astronomical Theory
Running a Temperance Revival
The Duke of Bridgewater
The Troubles of Royalty
p. 224
Huck Explains
Laying Out a Campaign
Working the Campmeeting
A Pirate at the Camp-meeting
The Duke as a Printer
p. 240
Sword Exercise
Hamlet's Soliloquy
They Loafed Around Town
A Lazy Town
Old Boggs
Dead
p. 254
Sherburn
Attending the Circus
Intoxication in the Ring
The Thrilling Tragedy
p. 264
"Sold"
Royal Comparisons
Jim Gets Homesick
p. 273
Jim in Royal Robes
They Take a Passenger
Getting Information
Family Grief
p. 281
Is It Them?
Sing the "Doxolojer"
Awful Square
Funeral Orgies
A Bad Investment
p. 291
A Pious King
The King's Clergy
She Asked His Pardon
Hiding in the Room
Huck Takes the Money
p. 301
The Funeral
Satisfying Curiosity
Suspicious of Huck
Quick Sales and Small Profits
p. 310
The Trip to England
"The Brute!"
Mary Jane Decides to Leave
Huck Parting with Mary Jane
Mumps
The Opposition Line
p. 322
Contested Relationship
The King Explains the Loss
A Question of Handwriting
Digging Up the Corpse
Huck Escapes
p. 334
The King Went for Him
A Royal Row
Powerful Mellow
p. 338
Ominous Plans
News from Jim
Old Recollections
A Sheep Story
Valuable Information
p. 349
Still and Sunday-like
Mistaken Identity
Up a Stump
In a Dilemma
p. 358
A Nigger Stealer
Southern Hospitality
A Pretty Long Blessing
Tar and Feathers
p. 367
The Hut by the Ash-hopper
Outrageous
Climbing the Lightning Rod
Troubled with Witches
p. 374
Escaping Properly
Dark Schemes
Discrimination in Stealing
A Deep Hole
p. 384
The Lighting Rod
His Level Best
A Bequest to Posterity
A High Figure
p. 391
The Last Shirt
Mooning Around
Sailing Orders
The Witch Pie
p. 399
The Coat of Arms
A Skilled Superintendent
Unpleasant Glory
A Tearful Subject
p. 407
Rats
Lively Bed-fellows
The Straw Dummy
p. 414
Fishing
The Vigilance Committee
A Lively Run
Jim Advises a Doctor
p. 423
The Doctor
Uncle Silas
Sister Hotchkiss
Aunt Sally in Trouble
p. 432
Tom Sawyer Wounded
The Doctor's Story
Tom Confesses
Aunt Polly Arrives
"Hand Out Them Letters"
Chapter the Lastp. 442
Out of Bondage
Paying the Captive
Yours Truly, Huck Finn
"Jim and the Dead Man"p. 447
The "Raft Episode"p. 452
An Unpublished Chapter
"Give Us a Rest"
The Corpse-Maker Crows
"The Child of Calamity"
They Both Weaken
Little Davy Steps In
After the Battle
Ed's Adventures
Something Queer
A Haunted Barrel
It Brings a Storm
The Barrel Pursues
Killed by Lightning
Allbright Atones
Ed Gets Mad
Snake or Boy?
"Snake Him Out"
Some Lively Lying
Off and Overboard
Bibliographyp. 471
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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