Catalogue

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Domestic policy and ideology : presidents and the American state, 1964-1987 /
David McKay.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1989.
description
xii, 223 p. : ill.
ISBN
052132033X
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1989.
isbn
052132033X
catalogue key
458394
 
Includes bibliographies and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
In this study Dr McKay examines the interaction between presidential policy preferences and the political environment, concentrating on welfare and urban policy and intergovernmental relations under Johnson, Nixon, Carter and Reagan. Throughout the work, McKay measures the independent influence of the White House on policy and draws conclusions for theories of American political development.
Description for Library
In this study Dr McKay examines the interaction between presidential policy preferences and the political environment, concentrating on welfare and urban policy and intergovernmental relations under Johnson, Nixon, Carter and Reagan. McKay traces the origins of domestic initiatives, assesses the intellectual coherence of policies and examines the ways in which the four presidents adapted their strategies according to their legislative fortunes and the experience of implementing policies. Throughout the work, McKay measures the independent influence of the White House on policy and draws conclusions for theories of American political development.
Main Description
Presidential leadership in America can and does make a great deal of difference to what is debated and eventually legislated. At the same time presidents are obviously constrained by what is always a complex and difficult political environment. In this study Dr McKay examines the interaction between presidential policy preferences and the political environment, concentrating on welfare and urban policy and intergovernmental relations under Johnson, Nixon, Carter and Reagan. McKay traces the origins of domestic initiatives, assesses the intellectual coherence of policies and examines the ways in which the four presidents adapted their strategies according to their legislative fortunes and the experience of implementing policies. Throughout the work, McKay measures the independent influence of the White House on policy and draws conclusions for theories of American political development, in particular for the opportunities and constraints provided by the fragmentation of the New Deal political regime.
Main Description
The presidential leadership in America can and does make a great deal of difference as to what is debated and eventually legislated. At the same time presidents are obviously constrained by what is always a complex and difficult political environment. This study examines the interaction between presidential policy preferences and the political environment, concentrating on welfare and urban policy and intergovernmental relations under Johnson, Nixon, Carter, and Reagan. The author traces the origins of domestic initiatives, assesses the intellectual coherence of policies, and examines the way in which the four presidents adapted their strategies according to the fortunes and experience of implementing policies. He measures the independent influence of the White House on policy and draws conclusions for theories of American political development, in particular for the opportunities and constraints provided by the fragmentation of the New Deal political regime.
Table of Contents
Preface and acknowledgements
List of abbreviations
The presidency, public policy and American political development
Explaining federal spending
Lyndon Johnson: executive-led ideology
Richard Nixon: reluctant reformer?
Carter and the politics of confusion
Disengagement under Reagan: I. The new federalism
Disengagement under Reagan: II. A centralist strategy for devolution
The presidency and regime fragmentation
Notes
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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