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Porfirio Díaz /
Paul Garner.
imprint
Harlow, Exxex ; New York : Longman, 2001.
description
ix, 269 p. : map.
ISBN
0582292670 (limp : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Harlow, Exxex ; New York : Longman, 2001.
isbn
0582292670 (limp : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4583762
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Paul Garner is Professor of Spanish and Latin American Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-02-01:
This concise and well-presented biography was published at a most appropriate time. During his extended authoritarian rule of Mexico (1876-1910), Porfirio Diaz worked to create a stable and modern nation linked to world markets and foreign technology. Garner (Goldsmiths College, London) does not deny that the strong man used harsh methods to assure political and social tranquility but demonstrates that he established alliances with regional political leaders and was willing to compromise with a number of interest groups, including the Roman Catholic Church. Despite his close ties with US banking and business interests, Diaz sought to balance North American influence with European ties and on many occasions supported domestic Mexican entrepreneurs. The revolutionary forces that toppled the aging regime in 1910 roundly denounced the former president as a traitor of the people of Mexico and launched a program of political and economic nationalism to replace his legacy. After 1982, however, the controlling Revolutionary Party of Mexico launched a neoliberal economic program reminiscent of the Diaz era that reached a high point in early 1994 with the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). This study offers a balanced critique of the complex regime of Porfirio Diaz and its impact on Mexico as it enters the 21st century. E. H. Moseley emeritus, University of Alabama
Reviews
Review Quotes
'a sophicated revisionist analysis...there is little doubt that Garner's study will dramatically change the way in which the porfiriato has been depicted and understood' Will Fowler, Journal of Latin American Studies   "Garner displays, in general, commendable open-mindedness and balance." Alan Knight, History
'a sophicated revisionist analysis...there is little doubt that Garner's study will dramatically change the way in which the porfiriato has been depicted and understood'Will Fowler, Journal of Latin American Studies "Garner displays, in general, commendable open-mindedness and balance." Alan Knight, History
'a sophicated revisionist analysis...there is little doubt that Garner's study will dramatically change the way in which theporfiriatohas been depicted and understood'Will Fowler, Journal of Latin American Studies "Garner displays, in general, commendable open-mindedness and balance." Alan Knight,History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Porfirio Díaz, President of Mexico (1876-1880, 1884-1911) dominated his country during a crucial phase in its development as a modern nation. His regime has mostly been viewed from the perspective of the Mexican Revolution (1910-20) which finally forced him into exile - the abuse of power is seen as the principal cause of his downfall. Díaz has more recently come to be seen in a rather less damning light. This profile places the regime in its more appropriate nineteenth-century context, highlighting the difficulty of implementing liberal policies in societies with strong colonial traditions, and of balancing material development with order and stability. In Mexico, Díaz oversaw real material achievements, and successfully avoided serious domestic conflict, but sank into repressive tactics as his regime became progressively undermined by its own internal contradictions. This book is an account of political survival and demise, this is the first biography in English for decades of a central figure in the history of Latin America. Paul Garner is Professor of Spanish and Latin American Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London.
Back Cover Copy
Porfirio D¿, President of Mexico (1876-1880, 1884-1911) dominated his country during a crucial phase in its development as a modern nation. His regime has mostly been viewed from the perspective of the Mexican Revolution (1910-20) which finally forced him into exile - the abuse of power is seen as the principal cause of his downfall. D¿ has more recently come to be seen in a rather less damning light. This profile places the regime in its more appropriate nineteenth-century context, highlighting the difficulty of implementing liberal policies in societies with strong colonial traditions, and of balancing material development with order and stability. In Mexico, D¿ oversaw real material achievements, and successfully avoided serious domestic conflict, but sank into repressive tactics as his regime became progressively undermined by its own internal contradictions. This book is an account of political survival and demise, this is the first biography in English for decades of a central figure in the history of Latin America. Paul Garner is Professor of Spanish and Latin American Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Garner reassesses a political career that spanned more than 40 years, and examines the claims that post-revolutionary Mexico was not the break with the past that the revolutionary inheritors claimed.
Long Description
The fall of Porfirio Diaz has traditionally been presented as a watershed between old and new: an old style repressive and conservative government, and the more democratic and representative system that flowered in the wake of the Mexican Revolution. Now this view is being challenged by a new generation of historians, who point out that Diaz originally rose to power in alliance with anti-conservative forces and was a modernising force as well as a dictator. Drawing together the threads of this revisionist reading of the Porfiriato, Garner reassesses a political career that spanned more than forty years, and examines the claims that post-revolutionary Mexico was not the break with the past that the revolutionary inheritors claimed.
Main Description
The fall of Porfirio Diaz has traditionally been presented as a watershed between old and new: an old style repressive and conservative government, and the more democratic and representative system that flowered in the wake of the Mexican Revolution. Now this view is being challenged by a new generation of historians, who point out that Diaz originally rose to power in alliance with anti-conservative forces and was a modernising force as well as a dictator. Drawing together the threads of this revisionist reading of the Porfiriato , Garner reassesses a political career that spanned more than forty years, and examines the claims that post-revolutionary Mexico was not the break with the past that the revolutionary inheritors claimed.
Table of Contents
Preface and Acknowledgementsp. vii
Porfirio Diaz and Mexican Historiography: Porfirismo, Anti-Porfirismo and Neo-Porfirismop. 1
Anti-Porfirismop. 5
Porfirismop. 7
Neo-Porfirismop. 12
The Foundations of Porfirian Mexico: Liberalism, Authoritarianism and the Patriotic Struggle, 1855-67p. 18
Provincial origins: Diaz and Oaxaca, 1830-55p. 21
Diaz's 'conversion' to liberalismp. 24
The authoritarian tradition: caudillismo and militarismp. 31
The entry into politics: the Revolution of Ayutla, 1854p. 34
National Guard commander and popular liberal, 1855-67p. 35
The Long Road to the Presidency, 1867-76p. 48
The presidential campaign of 1867p. 52
The Diaz brothers in Oaxaca, 1867-71p. 54
The Rebellion of La Noria, 1871-72p. 55
The campaign against Lerdo, 1872-76p. 58
The Tuxtepec campaign, 1876p. 61
Pragmatic Liberalism, 1876-84p. 68
The principles of Porfirian politicsp. 70
The elections of 1880p. 88
The presidency of Manuel Gonzalez, 1880-84p. 90
The Consolidation of Power: Patriarchal Liberalism, 1884-1911p. 98
Political practice after 1884p. 100
Elections and re-electionsp. 102
Diaz and the governorsp. 107
The militaryp. 110
The churchp. 115
The pressp. 123
The cult of personalityp. 127
Pax porfiriana?p. 130
Diplomacy, Foreign Policy and International Relations, 1876-1911p. 137
The parameters of foreign policyp. 139
Diaz and foreign policyp. 142
Mexico and the USAp. 145
Mexico and the European powersp. 153
The international image of Mexico in the Fiestas del Centenario, 1910p. 158
Paying for Order and Progress: Economic Development, 1876-1911p. 163
The evolution of economic policyp. 168
Indicators of progressp. 173
The Price of Order and Progress: The Decline and Fall of the Diaz Regime, 1900-11p. 194
Revolutionary historiography and the demise of the regimep. 196
The regional impact of Porfirian developmentp. 200
National political crisisp. 205
The Creelman interview, 1908p. 212
Anti-re-electionism and Maderismop. 215
Epilogue and Conclusionsp. 222
Glossaryp. 231
Bibliographical Essayp. 234
Chronologyp. 240
Map: Mexico in the Diaz erap. 256
Indexp. 259
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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