Catalogue


Christians and Jews in the Ottoman Arab world : the roots of sectarianism /
Bruce Masters.
imprint
Cambridge, UK. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
description
xiii, 222 p.
ISBN
0521803330 hardback
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
isbn
0521803330 hardback
catalogue key
4581909
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 202-217) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Bruce Masters is Professor of History at Wesleyan University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-07-01:
The publication in 1982 of Christians and Jews in the Ottoman Empire, ed. by Benjamin Braude and Bernard Lewis, seems to have triggered new research on the subject of "minorities" in the Ottoman Empire. "Minorities" is placed in quotations because non-Muslims in the empire were seen as independent, religious-cultural communities with their own leadership, and not as "minorities." The term used to describe the non-Muslim communities was anasir-i muhtelife ("diverse elements"); ekalliyet ("minorities") is a 20th-century innovation imported from the West. Masters (Wesleyan Univ.) focuses his research on the Arab provinces and describes how the identities of the Christian and Jewish communities evolved over the centuries of Ottoman rule as the empire was integrated in the capitalist world economy. His study is based on a variety of archival sources--US missionary archives, the national archives of Syria, Ottoman documents, and British and American diplomatic records--as well as works published in Arabic, Turkish, and European languages. Masters has created an excellent piece of scholarship, both objective and comprehensive, that will go a long way to help readers understand "the roots of sectarianism" in the region today. Upper-division undergraduates and above. F. Ahmad University of Massachusetts at Boston
Reviews
Review Quotes
'... this book is extremely well written ... It deserves a wide audience.Â’Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians
"This book reconfirms Bruce Masters as the preeminent expert in Ottoman-and-Arab history." The MIT Electronic Journal of Middle East Studies
"...a thoughtful and thought-provoking book..." American Historical Review
'... a valuable contribution to our understanding of the relationship of religion, identity, and politics in the Arab Middle East.' Rebecca Bryant, Ethnic and Racial Studies
'... a valuable contribution to our understanding of the relationship of religion, identity, and politics in the Arab Middle East.Â’Rebecca Bryant, Ethnic and Racial Studies
'... this book is extremely well written ... It deserves a wide audience.' Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians
'... this book is extremely well written ... It deserves a wide audience.'Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians
'This extremely well-researched and insightful book is of great interest not only to academics, but also to a wider readership eager to understand the present turmoil in the former provinces of the Ottoman Empire and to imagine solutions to their crises.'Middle Eastern Studies
'This extremely well-researched and insightful book is of great interest not only to academics, but also to a wider readership eager to understand the present turmoil in the former provinces of the Ottoman Empire and to imagine solutions to their crises.' Middle Eastern Studies
"Christians and Jews in the Ottoman Arab World is an excellent study of the history of the Arab Christians in Syria and the development of the Arab Catholic community in Aleppo under Ottoman rule. Bruce Masters, probably the most knowledgeable historian of Aleppo during this period, uses his experience and familiarity with the history to provide us with a penetrating analysis of one of the central features in the early modern history of the region." Middle East Journal
'The richness of the book in terms of scope, its careful argument in the interpretation of individual events and actions, based on primary source material of various kinds, and the well organized synthesis of numerous divergent strains, offer more than a unified new key to the sectarian violence of the 19th century. It will certainly become an important assignment in graduate and undergraduate courses on the Arab World in Ottoman times, and on minorities in the Middle East in general.' JESHO
"Bruce Masters's work is a welcome addition to a growing number of monographs that bring to light hitherto neglected aspects of Ottoman history and the complexities of the human experience of the human experience that it represent. Master's book provides rich information...a commendable effort to draw as holistic and dynamic a picture as possible." Engin Deniz Akarli, Journal of Near Eastern Studies
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2002
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume explores the history of Christians and Jews in the Arab provinces of the Ottoman empire and how their identities as non-Muslims evolved over 400 years.
Description for Bookstore
Explores the history of Christians and Jews in the Ottoman empire and how their identities evolved over four hundred years. Whi le early communities lived within the hierarchy of Muslim law, the nineteenth century witnessed radical change. In response to Western influences, conflict erupted between Muslims and Christians across the empire. This marked the beginning of tensions which informed the rhetoric of religious fundamentalism in the empire's successor states throughout the twentieth century. Thus Masters negotiates the present through the past, contributing to our understanding of the contemporary Muslim world.
Description for Bookstore
Masters explores the evolution of Christian and Jewish communities in the Ottoman empire over four hundred years. Early communities lived with the hierarchy of Muslim law, but the nineteenth century marked the beginning of tensions between Muslims and Christians and the twentieth-century rhetoric of religious fundamentalism.
Main Description
Masters explores the history of Christians and Jews in the Arab provinces of the Ottoman empire and how their identities as non-Muslims evolved over four hundred years. At the start of this period, in the sixteenth century, social community was circumscribed by religious identity and non-Muslims lived within the hierarchy established by Muslim law. In the nineteenth century, however, in response to Western influences, a radical change took place. Conflict erupted between Muslims and Christians in different parts of the empire in a challenge to that hierarchy. This marked the beginning, as the author illustrates, of the tensions which have to a large extent inspired the nationalist and religious rhetoric in the empire's successor states throughout the twentieth century. In this way, Masters negotiates the present through the past. His book will make a major contribution to an understanding of the political and religious conflicts of the modern Middle East.
Main Description
Masters explores the history of Christians and Jews in the Ottoman Empire and how their identities evolved over four hundred years. While early communities lived within the hierarchy of Muslim law, the nineteenth century witnessed radical change. In response to Western influences, conflict erupted between Muslims and Christians across the empire. This marked the beginning of tensions that informed the rhetoric of religious fundamentalism in the empire's successor states throughout the twentieth century. Thus Masters negotiates the present through the past, contributing to our understanding of the contemporary Muslim world.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The limits of tolerance: the social status of non-Muslims in the Ottoman Arab lands
The Ottoman Arab world: a diversity of sects and peoples
Merchants and missionaries in the seventeenth century: the West intrudes
New opportunities and challenges in the 'long' eighteenth century
Intercommunal dissonance in the nineteenth century
After the 'events': the search for community in the twilight of empire
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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