Catalogue


Acheson and empire : the British accent in American foreign policy /
John T. McNay.
imprint
Columbia, Mo. : University of Missouri Press, c2001.
description
x, 219 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0826213448 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Columbia, Mo. : University of Missouri Press, c2001.
isbn
0826213448 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4577234
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
John T. McNay is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Cincinnati.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-02-01:
McNay (Univ. of Cincinnati) presents a revisionist view of the realist Dean Acheson to explain his role as Truman's Secretary of State in the early Cold War. Infused with psychological insights and family history, the author ascribes Acheson's pro-British and pro-French sensibilities to his admiration of Cardinal Richelieu as the steward of France's destiny. In short, Acheson applied the "imperial paradigm" to US foreign policy in the Cold War with the USSR, to issues of independence in Egypt, Iran, India, South Africa, and Ireland, and to the Korean War. For contrast and comparison, see I.F. Stone, The Truman Era (1953); David Brinkley, Dean Acheson: The Cold War Years (CH, Mar'93); and Gaddis Smith, Dean Acheson (CH, Nov'72). McNay goes beyond many aspects of these earlier studies to show a consistent vision of empire in Acheson's thought even after he left the State Department, especially in the US's China policy and the war in Vietnam. Highly recommended for general readers and upper-division undergraduate collections and above. S. Prisco III Stevens Institute of Technology
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2002
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Summaries
Main Description
Acheson and Empire offers a compelling reassessment of Dean Acheson's policies toward the former colonial world during his period as secretary of state from 1949 to 1953. John T. McNay argues that Acheson inherited through his own personal history a way of understanding the world that encouraged imperial-style international relationships. This worldview represented a well-developed belief system rooted in his Ulster Protestant heritage that remained consistent throughout his life. By exploring relationships of the United States with Britain and countries formerly or then controlled by Britain, such as India, Ireland, Iran, and Egypt, McNay shows the significance of Acheson's beliefs. McNay argues that Acheson's support of existing imperial relationships was so steadfast that it often led other nations to perceive that the United States was nothing more than a front for British interests. He believes this approach to foreign policy damaged American relations with emerging countries and misled the British regarding possibilities of an Anglo-American partnership. Acheson and Empire contends that the widely accepted view of Acheson as a foreign policy realist is misleading and that historians should acknowledge that his affinity for the British Empire went beyond his clothing and mannerisms. McNay maintains that the widely accepted view of Acheson as one of a group of "wise men" who shaped the Cold War world by basing their decisions on cold calculation of American interests should be reconsidered. Drawing from extensive research in archival sources, including the Truman Library, the National Archives, the Public Record Office in London, and Acheson's personal papers at Yale, Acheson and Empire offers a fresh look at Dean Acheson that runs counter to previous biographies and many histories of the Cold War. Home Complete Catalog Order Information Search
Main Description
Acheson and Empireoffers a compelling reassessment of Dean Acheson's policies toward the former colonial world during his period as secretary of state from 1949 to 1953. John T. McNay argues that Acheson inherited through his own personal history a way of understanding the world that encouraged imperial-style international relationships. This worldview represented a well-developed belief system rooted in his Ulster Protestant heritage that remained consistent throughout his life. By exploring relationships of the United States with Britain and countries formerly or then controlled by Britain, such as India, Ireland, Iran, and Egypt, McNay shows the significance of Acheson's beliefs. McNay argues that Acheson's support of existing imperial relationships was so steadfast that it often led other nations to perceive that the United States was nothing more than a front for British interests. He believes this approach to foreign policy damaged American relations with emerging countries and misled the British regarding possibilities of an Anglo-American partnership. Acheson and Empirecontends that the widely accepted view of Acheson as a foreign policy realist is misleading and that historians should acknowledge that his affinity for the British Empire went beyond his clothing and mannerisms. McNay maintains that the widely accepted view of Acheson as one of a group of "wise men" who shaped the Cold War world by basing their decisions on cold calculation of American interests should be reconsidered. Drawing from extensive research in archival sources, including the Truman Library, the National Archives, the Public Record Office in London, and Acheson's personal papers at Yale,Acheson and Empireoffers a fresh look at Dean Acheson that runs counter to previous biographies and many histories of the Cold War. Home Complete Catalog Order Information Search
Unpaid Annotation
Acheson and Empire offers a compelling reassessment of Dean Acheson's policies toward the former colonial world during his period as secretary of state from 1949 to 1953. John T. McNay argues that Acheson inherited through his own personal history a way of understanding the world that encouraged imperial-style international relationships. This worldview represented a well-developed belief system rooted in his Ulster Protestant heritage that remained consistent throughout his life.By exploring relationships of the United States with Britain and countries formerly or then controlled by Britain, such as India, Ireland, Iran, and Egypt, McNay shows the significance of Acheson's beliefs. McNay argues that Acheson's support of existing imperial relationships was so steadfast that it often led other nations to perceive that the United States was nothing more than a front for British interests. He believes this approach to foreign policy damaged American relations with emerging countries and misled the British regarding possibilities of an Anglo-American partnership.Acheson and Empire contends that the widely accepted view of Acheson as a foreign policy realist is misleading and that historians should acknowledge that his affinity for the British Empire went beyond his clothing and mannerisms. McNay maintains that the widely accepted view of Acheson as one of a group of "wise men" who shaped the Cold War world by basing their decisions on cold calculation of American interests should be reconsidered.Drawing from extensive research in archival sources, including the Truman Library, the National Archives, the Public Record Office in London, and Acheson's personal papers at Yale, Achesonand Empire offers a fresh look at Dean Acheson that runs counter to previous biographies and many histories of the Cold War.
Main Description
Acheson and Empireoffers a compelling reassessment of Dean Acheson's policies toward the former colonial world during his period as secretary of state from 1949 to 1953. John T. McNay argues that Acheson inherited through his own personal history a way of understanding the world that encouraged imperial-style international relationships. This worldview represented a well-developed belief system rooted in his Ulster Protestant heritage that remained consistent throughout his life. By exploring relationships of the United States with Britain and countries formerly or then controlled by Britain, such as India, Ireland, Iran, and Egypt, McNay shows the significance of Acheson's beliefs. McNay argues that Acheson's support of existing imperial relationships was so steadfast that it often led other nations to perceive that the United States was nothing more than a front for British interests. He believes this approach to foreign policy damaged American relations with emerging countries and misled the British regarding possibilities of an Anglo-American partnership. Acheson and Empirecontends that the widely accepted view of Acheson as a foreign policy realist is misleading and that historians should acknowledge that his affinity for the British Empire went beyond his clothing and mannerisms. McNay maintains that the widely accepted view of Acheson as one of a group of "wise men" who shaped the Cold War world by basing their decisions on cold calculation of American interests should be reconsidered. Drawing from extensive research in archival sources, including the Truman Library, the National Archives, the Public Record Office in London, and Acheson's personal papers at Yale, Acheson and Empireoffers a fresh look at Dean Acheson that runs counter to previous biographies and many histories of the Cold War. Home Complete Catalog Order Information Search
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Champion of Empirep. 11
The Special Relationshipp. 39
Bonds of Loyaltyp. 61
The Ulster Connectionp. 81
The Kashmir Connectionp. 101
The Iran Connectionp. 129
The Egypt Connectionp. 158
Epiloguep. 193
Bibliographyp. 203
Indexp. 217
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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