Catalogue

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Faces of power : Alexander's image and Hellenistic politics /
Andrew Stewart.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1993.
description
xxxvii, 507 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
ISBN
0520068513 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1993.
isbn
0520068513 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
457683
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 471-492) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"There is no more evocative Greek portrait type than that of Alexander the Great. By exploring its potency and development in antiquity . . . Stewart has made an impressive demonstration of the value of this broader approach to a traditional art-historical subject."--Sir John Boardman, Ashmolean Museum
Summaries
Long Description
Alexander the Great changed the face of the ancient world. During his life and after his death, his image in works of art exerted an unprecedented influence-on marbles, bronzes, ivories, frescoes, mosaics, coins, medals, even painted pottery and reliefware. Alexander's physiognomy became the most famous in history. But can we really know what meaning lies behind these images? Andrew Stewart demonstrates that these portraits--wildly divergent in character, quality, type, provenance, date, and purpose--actually transmit not so much alikenessof Alexander as a set of carefully crafted clichÉs that mobilize thenotion"Alexander" for diverse ends and diverse audiences. Stewart discusses the portraits as studies in power and his original interpretation of them gives unprecedented fullness and shape to the idea and image called "Alexander."
Main Description
Alexander the Great changed the face of the ancient world. During his life and after his death, his image in works of art exerted an unprecedented influence--on marbles, bronzes, ivories, frescoes, mosaics, coins, medals, even painted pottery and reliefware. Alexander's physiognomy became the most famous in history. But can we really know what meaning lies behind these images? Andrew Stewart demonstrates that these portraits--wildly divergent in character, quality, type, provenance, date, and purpose--actually transmit not so much a likeness of Alexander as a set of carefully crafted clichés that mobilize the notion "Alexander" for diverse ends and diverse audiences. Stewart discusses the portraits as studies in power and his original interpretation of them gives unprecedented fullness and shape to the idea and image called "Alexander."
Main Description
Alexander the Great changed the face of the ancient world. During his life and after his death, his image in works of art exerted an unprecedented influence-on marbles, bronzes, ivories, frescoes, mosaics, coins, medals, even painted pottery and reliefware. Alexander's physiognomy became the most famous in history. But can we really know what meaning lies behind these images? Andrew Stewart demonstrates that these portraits--wildly divergent in character, quality, type, provenance, date, and purpose--actually transmit not so much a likeness of Alexander as a set of carefully crafted clichés that mobilize the notion "Alexander" for diverse ends and diverse audiences. Stewart discusses the portraits as studies in power and his original interpretation of them gives unprecedented fullness and shape to the idea and image called "Alexander."
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Preface
Introductionp. 1
Approaching Alexander
Textsp. 9
Historiesp. 9
The Portraits: Testimoniap. 21
Imagesp. 42
Survivorsp. 42
Synthesisp. 52
Approachesp. 56
Alexander: An Encounterp. 71
A Meeting in Kilikiap. 71
Personalp. 72
New Achillesp. 78
King Alexanderp. 86
God Invincible?p. 95
King and Conqueror
Masks of Youthp. 105
Youth and Rejuvenationp. 105
Attic and Lysippicp. 106
Progenyp. 113
King and Polisp. 121
Charges to Rememberp. 123
In Memoriamp. 123
The Alexander Mosaic: A Readingp. 130
Apulian Echoesp. 150
Spear-won Landp. 158
Unifying Imagesp. 158
Alexander Doryphorosp. 161
Chameleon Kingp. 171
Make War, Not Lovep. 181
On Loan from Olymposp. 191
A Revocable Giftp. 191
The Heritage of Apellesp. 191
Enigma in Malibup. 209
Death and Transfigurationp. 214
Survivors and Successors
Imperial Egyptp. 229
A Regional Hegemony?p. 229
Alexandreion Ptolemaioup. 231
Blessed Patron, Blessed Cityp. 243
Alexandrian Carnivalp. 252
Alexander's Image and Ptolemaic Policyp. 260
Images of Insecurityp. 263
"Alexander and Victory"p. 263
Crusade in Africap. 266
A Soldier's Returnp. 270
Macedonia and Greece: Kassandros to Gonatasp. 277
Asian Figureheadp. 290
Two Vassalsp. 290
The Cities of Asiap. 307
Antigonos, Demetrios, Seleukos, and Lysimachosp. 312
Epilogue: Resurrectionsp. 325
App. 1. Alexander's Personal Appearancep. 341
App. 2. The Hellenistic and Roman Republican Portraits: Literary and Epigraphical Testimoniap. 359
App. 3. Cults of Alexanderp. 419
App. 4. Preserved Alexander Portraits Discussed in the Textp. 421
App. 5. The Getty Fragments: A Cataloguep. 438
App. 6. Hephaistionp. 453
App. 7. Alexander and the Successors: A Chronology (336-275 B.C.)p. 456
Bibliographyp. 471
Indexp. 493
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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