Catalogue


Tuberculosis in the workplace /
Marilyn J. Field, editor ; Committee on Regulating Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis, Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Institute of Medicine.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : National Academy Press, c2001.
description
xiv, 340 p. ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0309073308 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
SciTech Book News, December 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Before effective treatments were introduced in the 1950s, tuberculosis was a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Health care workers were at particular risk. Although the occupational risk of tuberculosis has been declining in recent years, this new book from the Institute of Medicine concludes that vigilance in tuberculosis control is still needed in workplaces and communities. Tuberculosis in the Workplace reviews evidence about the effectiveness of control measures-such as those recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-intended to prevent transmission of tuberculosis in health care and other workplaces. It discusses whether proposed regulations from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration would likely increase or sustain compliance with effective control measures and would allow adequate flexibility to adapt measures to the degree of risk facing workers.
Long Description
Before effective treatments were introduced in the 1950s, tuberculosis was a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Health care workers were at particular risk. Although the occupational risk of tuberculosis has been declining in recent years, this new book from the Institute of Medicine concludes that vigilance in tuberculosis control is still needed in workplaces and communities. Tuberculosis in the Workplace reviews evidence about the effectiveness of control measures--such as those recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention--intended to prevent transmission of tuberculosis in health care and other workplaces. It discusses whether proposed regulations from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration would likely increase or sustain compliance with effective control measures and would allow adequate flexibility to adapt measures to the degree of risk facing workers.
Table of Contents
Summaryp. 1
Introductionp. 13
Risks to Health Care and Other Workersp. 15
Overview of Reportp. 16
Responses to Resurgent Tuberculosisp. 17
The Broader Public Health Context: Eliminating Tuberculosis in the United States and Worldwidep. 21
Conclusionp. 23
Basics of Tuberculosisp. 24
Transmission and Development of Latent Tuberculosis Infection and Active Tuberculosisp. 25
Detection and Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infectionp. 28
Diagnosis and Treatment of Active Tuberculosisp. 37
Conclusionp. 41
Occupational Safety and Health Regulation in Contextp. 43
Strategies for Reducing Workplace Hazardsp. 43
The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and Its Administrationp. 45
Conclusionp. 55
Comparison of CDC Guidelines and Proposed OSHA Rulep. 56
CDC Guidelines on Preventing Transmission of Tuberculosis in Health Care Facilitiesp. 57
Proposed OSHA Rule on Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosisp. 59
Comparison of Guidelines and Proposed Rule: Administrative Controlsp. 63
Comparison of Guidelines and Proposed Rule: Engineering Controlsp. 74
Comparison of Guidelines and Proposed Rule: Personal Respiratory Protectionsp. 76
Conclusionp. 80
Occupational Risk of Tuberculosisp. 81
Concepts and Definitionsp. 82
Historical Perspectives on the Occupational Risk of Tuberculosisp. 85
More Recent Information on the Community and Occupational Risk of Tuberculosisp. 86
Committee Conclusionsp. 104
Summaryp. 107
Implementation and Effects of CDC Guidelinesp. 108
Implementation of Tuberculosis Control Guidelinesp. 109
Effects of Implementing Tuberculosis Control Measuresp. 122
Committee Conclusionsp. 131
Summaryp. 135
Regulation and the Future of Tuberculosis in the Workplacep. 137
Potential Effects of an OSHA Standard on Occupational Tuberculosisp. 138
The Workplace and the Communityp. 154
Referencesp. 157
Appendixes
Study Origins and Activitiesp. 173
The Tuberculin Skin Testp. 179
The Occupational Tuberculosis Risk of Health Care Workersp. 189
Effects of CDC Guidelines on Tuberculosis Control in Health Care Facilitiesp. 230
OSHA in a Health Care Contextp. 271
Respiratory Protection and Control of Tuberculosis in Health Care and Other Facilitiesp. 293
Recommendations of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Eliminating Tuberculosis in the United Statesp. 309
Committee Biographiesp. 314
Indexp. 319
Boxes, Figures and Tables
Boxes
Regulating Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis: Selective Chronology of Eventsp. 19
Key Terms Relevant to Justification of OSHA Standards as Used by the Agencyp. 49
Figures
Reported cases of tuberculosis, 1978-1998p. 14
Trends in tuberculosis funding and numbers of tuberculosis cases in the United Statesp. 18
Protocol for conducting a tuberculosis risk assessment in a health care facilityp. 67
Tuberculosis incidence rates per 100,000 population by year and reported employment status within preceding 24 monthsp. 90
Tables
Differences Between Latent Tuberculosis Infection and Active Pulmonary Tuberculosisp. 25
CDC Recommendations for Interpreting Reactions to the Tuberculin Skin Testp. 30
Positive Predictive Value of a Positive Tuberculin Skin Test Assuming 95 Percent Sensitivityp. 31
Importance of Disease or Condition Prevalence, Bayesian Probability Analysisp. 32
Worker Strategies to Control Workplace Hazardsp. 44
Summary of Administrative Controls (other than diagnosis and treatment) Recommended by CDC for Health Care Facilities, with Notes (in italics) on How Proposed OSHA Rule Differsp. 64
Summary of Patient Management Recommendations by CDC, with Notes (in italics) on How Proposed OSHA Rule Differsp. 73
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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