Catalogue


H. G. Wells's perennial Time machine /
edited by George Slusser, Patrick Parrinder, Danièle Chatelain.
imprint
Athens : University of Georgia Press, c2001.
description
xvi, 216 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0820322903 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Athens : University of Georgia Press, c2001.
isbn
0820322903 (alk. paper)
general note
"Selected essays from the Centenary conference "The time machine: past, present, and future" Imperial College, London July 26-29, 1995".
catalogue key
4544224
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Brian W. Aldiss is a writer of science fiction and contemporary novels, a poet, and an actor Paul Alkon, Leo S. Bing Professor of English at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles Larry W. Caldwell is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Evansville University in Evansville, Indiana Daniele Chatelain is Professor of French at the University of Redlands Robert Crossley, Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Boston Kirby Farrell's latest book is Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst J. R. Hammond is the founder and current President of the H. G. Wells Society. He is a Research Fellow at Nottingham Trent University, England Sylvia Hardy is a former lecturer, now a Research Fellow, at the University College of Northampton, England David Leon Higdon is Paul Whitfield Horn Professor of English at Texas Tech University John Huntington is Professor of English at the University of Illinois at Chicago Carlo Pagetti is Professor of Modern and Contemporary English Literature, Faculty of Letters and Philosophy, University of Milan, Italy Patrick Parrinder's books is Professor of English at the University of Reading, England W. M. S. Russell is Emeritus Professor of Sociology at the University of Reading, England Frank Scafella is Professor of English at the University of West Virginia George Slusser is Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of California, Riverside Joshua Stein holds master's degrees from the University of California, Riverside and the University of Liverpool
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Acclaimed as a work of genius when first published in 1895, "The Time Machine" represents a revolution in storytelling. H. G. Wells's first--and greatest--novel has been recognized worldwide as a founding text of the science fiction genre and one of the most seminal narratives of the last hundred years. This collection of essays offers a series of original, penetrating, and wide-ranging perspectives on Wells's masterpiece by an international group of major Wells and science fiction scholars. The authors explore such textual topics as the narrative techniques and mythological undertones of the novel as well as its contribution to modern ideas of time and evolution and its focusing of the intellectual cross-currents of the late nineteenth century. This insightful volume captures the innovative imagination, richness, and fascinating ambiguity that resulted in a classic literary work and demonstrates that Wells's novel is both a visionary story and an unstoppable idea.
Main Description
Acclaimed as a work of genius when first published in 1895, The Time Machine represents a revolution in storytelling. H. G. Wells's first--and greatest--novel has been recognized worldwide as a founding text of the science fiction genre and one of the most seminal narratives of the last hundred years. This collection of essays offers a series of original, penetrating, and wide-ranging perspectives on Wells's masterpiece by an international group of major Wells and science fiction scholars. The authors explore such textual topics as the narrative techniques and mythological undertones of the novel as well as its contribution to modern ideas of time and evolution and its focusing of the intellectual cross-currents of the late nineteenth century. This insightful volume captures the innovative imagination, richness, and fascinating ambiguity that resulted in a classic literary work and demonstrates that Wells's novel is both a visionary story and an unstoppable idea.
Main Description
Acclaimed as a work of genius when first published in 1895,The Time Machinerepresents a revolution in storytelling. H. G. Wells's first--and greatest--novel has been recognized worldwide as a founding text of the science fiction genre and one of the most seminal narratives of the last hundred years.This collection of essays offers a series of original, penetrating, and wide-ranging perspectives on Wells's masterpiece by an international group of major Wells and science fiction scholars. The authors explore such textual topics as the narrative techniques and mythological undertones of the novel as well as its contribution to modern ideas of time and evolution and its focusing of the intellectual cross-currents of the late nineteenth century. This insightful volume captures the innovative imagination, richness, and fascinating ambiguity that resulted in a classic literary work and demonstrates that Wells's novel is both a visionary story and an unstoppable idea.
Table of Contents
Note on the Textp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: The Time Machine's Centennial Audiencep. xi
Eternal Readability: A Work for All Time
The Time Machine as a First Novel: Myth and Allegory in Wells's Romancep. 3
Taking It as a Story: The Beautiful Lie of The Time Machinep. 12
Was the Time Machine Necessary?p. 27
The Rebirth of a Scientific Intelligence: Or, From "Traveller" to "Travailer" in The Time Machinep. 39
Time Before and After The Time Machinep. 50
Currents of Its Time: Neoteny, Anthropology, Society, Numerology, Imperiality
Wells and Neotenyp. 65
The Time Machine and Victorian Mythologyp. 76
The Time Machine and Well's Social Trajectoryp. 97
From Rome to Richmond: Wells, Universal History, and Prophetic Timep. 110
Change in the City: The Time Traveller's London and the "Baseless Fabric" of His Visionp. 122
The Rewriting: The Time Machine in the Twentieth Century and Beyond
Time at the End of Its Tether: H. G. Wells and the Subversion of Master Narrativep. 137
The Legacy of H. G. Wells's The Time Machine: Destabilization and Observationp. 150
Wells and the Sequency-Simultaneity Paradox: Heinlein's Rewriting of The Time Machine in "By His Bootstraps"p. 160
A Revision and a Gloss: Michael Bishop's Postmodern Interrogation of H. G. Wells's The Time Machinep. 176
Doomed Formicary versus the Technological Sublimep. 188
Afterword: In the Company of the Immortalsp. 195
Contributorsp. 207
Indexp. 211
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem