Catalogue


Central Eurasia : prize or quicksand? : contending views of instability in Karabakh, Ferghana and Afghanistan /
Kenneth Weisbrode.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press for the International Institute for Strategic Studies, 2001.
description
96 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0198510705
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press for the International Institute for Strategic Studies, 2001.
isbn
0198510705
catalogue key
4535641
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
The states of the former Soviet South - Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia,Kazakstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan - as well asAfghanistan, remain mired in a post-Soviet limbo ten years after the empire'sformal dissolution. While there has yet been no war among major powers over thespoils of empire, instability is rife throughout the region, while severalconflicts - the most notable being the civil wars in Afghanistan, Tajikistan andthe Caucasus - continue to cast a spell over regional stability. How much doesthis matter to the outside world? Do countries like the US have a stake in thisregion? How much are they to blame for its current condition?This paper argues that the major powers, chief among them the US, have played acentral role in fomenting a logic of regional rivalry that has prevented CentralEurasia from developing the critical foundations of co-operation that arenecessary to produce the kind of post-Soviet stability one finds in Europe.While the paper does not dismiss the many internal causes of instability, itchooses to focus on the significance of the region to outside powers and therole those powers have played, both on the ground and in the symbolic realm. Itdoes so by tracing the involvement of major powers in three particularly richareas of instability - Karabakh, Ferghana and Afghanistan. Each case illustratesdivergences between rhetorical policy and actual interests, and shows how theformer have hindered the latter.Instability in Central Eurasia has had relatively modest effects on the overallrelations among China, Iran, Russia, the US and other major powers like India,Pakistan and Turkey, but this may not last. This paper urges upon the majorpowers an earnest reassessment of collective interests in this region, beforeneglectful governments transform small-scale problems into far more seriousones.
Main Description
This paper argues that the major powers have played a central role in fomenting a logic of regional rivalry that has prevented Central Eurasia from developing the critical foundations of co-operation that are necessary to produce the kind of post-Soviet stability one finds in Europe. While the paper does not dismiss the many internal causes of instability, it chooses to focus on the significance of the region to outside powers and the role those powers have played, both on the ground and in the symbolic realm. It does so by tracing the involvement of major powers in three particularly rich areas of instability - Karabakh, Ferghana and Afghanistan. Each case illustrates divergences between rhetorical policy and actual interests, and shows how the former have hindered the latter.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 7
A 'New' Area on the Mapp. 11
What is Central Eurasia?p. 11
Which Are the Major Powers?p. 14
Impressions and Policiesp. 15
Relations with Russiap. 16
The Limits to Courtshipp. 18
The East and the Southp. 20
The American Energy Catalystp. 22
Forging a New Pecking Orderp. 26
Karabakh and the South Caucasusp. 27
Backgroundp. 27
America's Inhibitionp. 33
Russia's Ambivalencep. 34
Turkey's Frustrationp. 36
Iran's Prudencep. 40
Outcomep. 43
Ferghana and Central Asiap. 45
Backgroundp. 45
Western Indifferencep. 52
China's Fearp. 53
Iran's Ambivalencep. 56
Russia's Temptationp. 58
Outcomesp. 61
Afghanistanp. 63
Backgroundp. 64
Pakistan's Ambitionp. 68
Iran's Lamentp. 71
The Asian Connectionp. 73
American and Russian Antipathyp. 74
The Afghan Vortexp. 76
Outcomesp. 78
Conclusionp. 81
Notesp. 87
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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