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From civilization to segregation : social ideals and social control in southern Rhodesia, 1890-1934 /
Carol Summers.
imprint
Athens, Ohio : Ohio University Press, c1994.
description
xv, 311 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0821410741 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Athens, Ohio : Ohio University Press, c1994.
isbn
0821410741 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
453056
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 299-307) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-01:
Summers (Univ. of Richmond) has an excellent appreciation of the complex and changing dialogue between settlers and administrators, and settlers and Africans, in early Rhodesia. By writing a history of shifting public opinion, and (unlike some of her scholarly predecessors) by fully including Africans as actors in the formation of that public opinion, Summers seems to be breaking new ground. But her revisionist history is much less revisionist than she claims. Her conclusions support the detailed research of others, especially that published during recent decades. She has, however, repackaged some of that research in new ways. Her title shows how she has sought to focus the reader's attention on Rhodesia's civilizing mission; yet the cynicism of that mission, and indeed of the complementary focus in Rhodesia on individualism, has long been understood. Summers approaches these questions somewhat differently than others, but without offering new information or drawing new inferences. As an attempt to use communications theory and semiotics in an African context, the book stumbles. Poor index; no maps; slight bibliography. Researchers; faculty. R. I. Rotberg; Harvard University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 1995
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Summaries
Main Description
This study examines the social changes that took place in Southern Rhodesia after the arrival of the British South Africa Company in the 1890s. Summers work focuses on interactions among settlers, the officials of the British South America Company and the administration, missionaries, humanitarian groups in Britain, and the most vocal or noticeable groups of Africans. Through this period of military conquest and physical coercion, to the later attempts at segregationist social engineering, the ideals and justifications of Southern Rhodesians changed drastically. Native Policy, Native Education policies, and, eventually, segregationist Native Development policies changed and evolved as the white and black inhabitants of Southern Rhodesia (colonial Zimbabwe) struggled over the regions social form and future. Summerss work complements a handful of other recent works reexamining the social history of colonial Zimbabwe and demonstrating how knowledge, perception, and ideologies interacted with the economic and political dimensions of the regions past.
Main Description
This study examines the social changes that took place in Southern Rhodesia after the arrival of the British South Africa Company in the 1890s. Summer's work focuses on interactions among settlers, the officials of the British South America Company and the administration, missionaries, humanitarian groups in Britain, and the most vocal or noticeable groups of Africans. Through this period of military conquest and physical coercion, to the later attempts at segregationist social engineering, the ideals and justifications of Southern Rhodesians changed drastically. Native Policy, Native Education policies, and, eventually, segregationist Native Development policies changed and evolved as the white and black inhabitants of Southern Rhodesia (colonial Zimbabwe) struggled over the region's social form and future. Summers's work complements a handful of other recent works reexamining the social history of colonial Zimbabwe and demonstrating how knowledge, perception, and ideologies interacted with the economic and political dimensions of the region's past.
Table of Contents
Abbreviations
Note on Terminology
Acknowledgements
Introductionp. 1
Perception and Conquest: Violence in Mashonaland and Matabeleland, 1890-1896p. 13
Violence and Comprehension: Making Authority, 1894-1898p. 40
"Civilization" and Social Planning: Native Policy, 1898-1906p. 74
Disciplining Change: Native Policy and Native Education, 1903-1915p. 117
"A Different Sort of Civilisation": The Ideals of Native Education Policies, 1913-1934p. 167
Imposing Differences: From Socialization to Segregation, 1927-1934p. 226
Conclusionsp. 294
Bibliographyp. 299
Indexp. 308
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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