Catalogue

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France, the United States, and the Algerian War /
Irwin M. Wall.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2001.
description
xiii, 335 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520225341 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2001.
isbn
0520225341 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4504231
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Irwin M. Wall is Professor of History of the University of California, Riverside.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This is a fascinating and provocative work, based on amazingly thorough archival research that includes extensive use of previously classified materials. The narrative carries us through the long agony of the Algerian War and offers a keen and judicious analysis of the major parties involved, as well as of the immensely complex diplomatic negotations and of Charles de Gaulle's role in the resolution of the crisis."--David Schalk, author ofWar and the Ivory Tower: Algeria and Vietnam
Flap Copy
"This is a fascinating and provocative work, based on amazingly thorough archival research that includes extensive use of previously classified materials. The narrative carries us through the long agony of the Algerian War and offers a keen and judicious analysis of the major parties involved, as well as of the immensely complex diplomatic negotations and of Charles de Gaulle's role in the resolution of the crisis."--David Schalk, author of War and the Ivory Tower: Algeria and Vietnam
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-02-01:
The author's well-researched revision of France's retreat from Algeria reveals patterns of US involvement and culpability in French foreign and domestic policy. Traditional interpretations of the French defeat focus on the Metropole's eroding social fabric, ruptured civil-military relations, and the government's failure to address the imbalance between Algerians of European lineage and the more numerous Arab community. Wall (history, Univ. of California, Riverside) deftly uses US and French diplomatic archives to trace sources of tension that emerged between French and American interests as the Cold War unfolded. Thus, the Algerian War cast a long shadow over Franco-American relations. Wall shows how the ill-fated Fourth Republic and de Gaulle's Fifth Republic pursued remarkably similar foreign policy aims centered on maintaining parity among French, British, and American power. The US, according to Wall, helped shape events that brought de Gaulle to power, then tried to constrain French foreign policy ambitions. US leaders, including John Foster Dulles and President Eisenhower, often with little subtlety or patience, urged the French to divest themselves of Algeria so they could concentrate on building the European bulwark against Soviet influence. This is an important study for diplomatic, military, and political scholars. Upper-division undergraduates and above. A. C. Cain United States Air Force Air Command and Staff College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2002
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Summaries
Long Description
In this pioneering book, Irwin M. Wall unravels the intertwining threads of the protracted agony of France's war with Algeria, the American role in the fall of the Fourth Republic, the long shadow of Charles de Gaulle, and the decisive postwar power of the United States. At the heart of this study is an incisive analysis of how Washington helped bring de Gaulle to power and a penetrating revisionist account of his Algerian policy. Departing from widely held interpretations of the Algerian War, Wall approaches the conflict as an international diplomatic crisis whose outcome was primarily dependent on French relations with Washington, the NATO alliance, and the United Nations, rather than on military engagement. Wall makes extensive use of previously unexamined documents from the Department of State, the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and heretofore secret files of the Archives of the French Army at Vincennes and the Colonial Ministry at Aix-en-Provence. He argues convincingly that de Gaulle always intended to keep Algeria French, in line with his goal to make France the center of a reorganized French union of autonomous but depen- dent African states and the heart of a Europe of cooperating states. Such a union, which the French called Eurafrica, would further France's chance to be an equal partner with Britain and the United States in a reordered "Free World." In recent years the Algerian War has reclaimed its place in popular memory in France. Its interpreters have continued to view the conflict as a national, internal drama and de Gaulle as the second-time savior who ended French participation in a ruinous colonial war. But by analyzing the conflict in terms of French foreign policy, Wall shows the pivotal role of the United States and counters certain political myths that portray de Gaulle as an emancipator of colonial peoples. Wall's interpretation of the Algerian conflict may well spark controversy and will open important new avenues of debate concerning postwar international affairs.
Main Description
An original and provocative piece of classic diplomatic history that sheds new light on the post-WWII French-Algerian War.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Introductionp. 1
The United States and the Algerian Warp. 9
The Suez Crisisp. 33
The Degeneration of the Regimep. 67
The United States, Great Britain, and the Sakiet Crisisp. 99
The Fall of the Republic and the Coming of de Gaullep. 134
The United States, Algeria, and de Gaulle's Diplomacyp. 157
De Gaulle Reconsideredp. 192
Peacep. 229
Conclusionp. 260
Notesp. 269
Bibliographyp. 311
Indexp. 321
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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