Catalogue


Transgressing the bounds : subversive enterprises among the Puritan elite in Massachusetts, 1630-1692 /
Louise A. Breen.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2001.
description
vi, 292 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0195138007 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2001.
isbn
0195138007 (acid-free paper)
catalogue key
4481831
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Breen has identified a general pattern that is a useful guidepost for reading the actions, decisions, and changing alliances of Bay Colony leadership. In bringing these individuals to our attention, she has provided an illuminating window onto New England as a developing, ratehr than static,or stagnant, colonial area."-- The Journal of Religion
"Breen has identified a general pattern that is a useful guidepost forreading the actions, decisions, and changing alliances of Bay Colony leadership.In bringing these individuals to our attention, she has provided an illuminatingwindow onto New England as a developing, ratehr than static, or stagnant,colonial area."-- The Journal of Religion
"Breen has identified a general pattern that is a useful guidepost for reading the actions, decisions, and changing alliances of Bay Colony leadership. In bringing these individuals to our attention, she has provided an illuminating window onto New England as a developing, ratehr than static, or stagnant, colonial area."-- The Journal of Religion "This is a well-researched, nicely written and carefully thought out volume that makes it clear that there is more to be said about the Puritans. Breenis convincing in her argument that some of them were not so different from the rest of American colonists."--The Historian
"Breen has identified a general pattern that is a useful guidepost for reading the actions, decisions, and changing alliances of Bay Colony leadership. In bringing these individuals to our attention, she has provided an illuminating window onto New England as a developing, ratehr than static, or stagnant, colonial area."-- The Journal of Religion "This is a well-researched, nicely written and carefully thought out volume that makes it clear that there is more to be said about the Puritans. Breenis convincing in her argument that some of them were not so different from the rest of American colonists."-- The Historian
"Breen has identified a general pattern that is a useful guidepost for reading the actions, decisions, and changing alliances of Bay Colony leadership. In bringing these individuals to our attention, she has provided an illuminating window onto New England as a developing, ratehr than static, or stagnant, colonial area."--The Journal of Religion "This is a well-researched, nicely written and carefully thought out volume that makes it clear that there is more to be said about the Puritans. Breenis convincing in her argument that some of them were not so different from the rest of American colonists."--The Historian
Louise A. Breen has written a very good book that tries to make sense out of an immensely complicated subject, dissent in Puritan New England ... If Breen's basic premise is simple, her demonstration of it is complex and nuanced ... Proponents of diversity will get a big boost from this fine book, and dissent will get an intriguing organizing principle.
"...this book is stimulating in its adventurous, wide-ranging speculation. Moreover, it vividly shows once again the fallacy of conceiving of the massachusetts elite as a single 'New England mind.'"--American Historical Review
"...this book is stimulating in its adventurous, wide-ranging speculation.Moreover, it vividly shows once again the fallacy of conceiving of themassachusetts elite as a single 'New England mind.'"--American HistoricalReview
"This is a well-researched, nicely written and carefully thought out volume that makes it clear that there is more to be said about the Puritans. Breenis convincing in her argument that some of them were not so different from the rest of American colonists."--The Historian
"This is a well-researched, nicely written and carefully thought outvolume that makes it clear that there is more to be said about the Puritans.Breenis convincing in her argument that some of them were not so different fromthe rest of American colonists."--The Historian
"Breen has identified a general pattern that is a useful guidepost for reading the actions, decisions, and changing alliances of Bay Colony leadership. In bringing these individuals to our attention, she has provided an illuminating window onto New England as a developing, ratehr than static, or stagnant, colonial area."-- The Journal of Religion"...this book is stimulating in its adventurous, wide-ranging speculation. Moreover, it vividly shows once again the fallacy of conceiving of the massachusetts elite as a single 'New England mind.'"--American Historical Review"This is a well-researched, nicely written and carefully thought out volume that makes it clear that there is more to be said about the Puritans. Breenis convincing in her argument that some of them were not so different from the rest of American colonists."--The Historian
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Summaries
Long Description
This study offers a new interpretation of the puritan 'Antinomian' controversy and a skilful analysis of its wider and long term social and cultural significance. Breen argues that the controversy both reflected and fostered larger questions of identity that would persist in puritan New England throughout the seventeenth century: How much room for individualism among them of a more 'cosmopolitan' nature? How did they respond to those who did not share their celebrated tolerance toward Quakers, Indians, and outside influences in general? Central to Breen's study is the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massuchusetts, a private military company modelled on the fashionable 'artillery gardens' of London. Essentially an elite social club, this organization attracted a heterogeneous yet prominent membership whose diversity contrasted with the the social and religious ideals of the cultural majority.
Long Description
This study offers a new interpretation of the Puritan "Antinomian" controversy and a skillful analysis of its wider and long term social and cultural significance. Breen argues that controversy both reflected and fostered larger questions of identity that would persist in Puritan New England during the 17th century. Some issues discussed here include the existence of individualism in a society that valued conformity and the response of members of an inward-looking, localistic culture to those among them of a more "cosmopolitan" nature. Central to Breen's study is the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts, an elite social club that attracted a heterogeneous yet prominent membership, and whose diversity contrasted with the social and religious ideals of the cultural majority.
Main Description
This study offers a new interpretation of the Puritan "Antinomian" controversy and a skillful analysis of its wider and long term social and cultural significance. Breen argues that controversy both reflected and fostered larger questions of identity that would persist in Puritan New Englandduring the 17th century. Some issues discussed here include the existence of individualism in a society that valued conformity and the response of members of an inward-looking, localistic culture to those among them of a more "cosmopolitan" nature. Central to Breen's study is the Ancient andHonorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts, an elite social club that attracted a heterogeneous yet prominent membership, and whose diversity contrasted with the social and religious ideals of the cultural majority.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. v
Transgressing the Boundsp. 2
Introductionp. 3
A Contest of Cultures in Puritan Massachusettsp. 17
Honor, Heresy, and the Massachusetts Ordeal of John Underhillp. 57
Cosmopolitan Puritans in a Provincial Colonyp. 97
Daniel Gookin, King Philip's War, and the Dangers of Intercultural Mediatorshipp. 145
Epilogue and Conclusionp. 197
Notesp. 221
Indexp. 283
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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