Catalogue

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Women, nationalism and the romantic stage : theatre and politics in Britain, 1780-1800 /
Betsy Bolton.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
description
xiv, 272 p. : ill.
ISBN
0521771161 (hb)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
isbn
0521771161 (hb)
catalogue key
4479517
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Entertaining as well as admirably researched; the readings are illuminating, and Bolton delivers an important reminder of the continuing power of the stage in the Romantic era." ASECS Book Reviews Online
"This is, perhaps, Bolton's most significant contribution to our understanding of how theater as an enacted medium...held such power in this period." Nineteenth Century Studies
"Women, Nationalism, and the Romantic Stage is to be admired for the originality of its contents and the value of its method..well written and clearly organized...While it offers illuminating readings and careful scholarship to be apreciated for their own ends, it is also a book that invites further thinking about larger issues, including definitions of nationalism and the nature of women's political and literary authority within Romanticism." The Wordsworth Circle
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In the 1780s and 90s, theatre critics described the stage as a state in political tumult. Betsy Bolton examines the ways Romantic women performers and playwrights used theatrical conventions to intervene in politics.
Description for Bookstore
Bolton examines the ways Romantic women performers and playwrights used theatrical conventions to intervene in politics. This well-illustrated 2001 study draws on poetry and personal memoirs, popular drama and parliamentary debates, political caricatures and theatrical reviews to extend current understandings of Romantic theatre, the public sphere, and Romantic gender relations.
Description for Bookstore
Bolton examines the ways Romantic women performers and playwrights used theatrical conventions to intervene in politics. This well-illustrated study draws on poetry and personal memoirs, popular drama and parliamentary debates, political caricatures and theatrical reviews to extend current understandings of Romantic theatre, the public sphere, and Romantic gender relations.
Description for Bookstore
In the 1780s and 90s, theatre critics described the stage as a state in political tumult, while politicians invoked theatre as a model for politics both good and bad. In this study, Betsy Bolton examines the ways Romantic women performers and playwrights used theatrical conventions to intervene in politics. This well illustrated study draws on canonical poetry and personal memoirs, popular drama and parliamentary debates, political caricatures and theatrical reviews to extend current understandings of Romantic theatre, the public sphere, and Romantic gender relations.
Description for Library
In the 1780s and 90s, theatre critics described the stage as a state in political tumult, while politicians invoked theatre as a model for politics both good and bad. In this study, Betsy Bolton examines the ways Romantic women performers and playwrights used theatrical conventions to intervene in politics. This well-illustrated study draws on canonical poetry and personal memoirs, popular drama and parliamentary debates, political caricatures and theatrical reviews to extend current understandings of Romantic theatre, the public sphere, and Romantic gender relations.
Main Description
In the 1780s and 90s, theater critics described the stage as a state in political tumult, while politicians invoked theater as a model for politics both good and bad. In this study, Betsy Bolton examines the ways Romantic women performers and playwrights used theatrical conventions to intervene in politics. This well illustrated study draws on canonical poetry and personal memoirs, popular drama and parliamentary debates, political caricatures and theatrical reviews to extend current understandings of Romantic theater, the public sphere, and Romantic gender relations.
Main Description
In the 1780s and 90s, theatre critics described the stage as a state in political tumult, while politicians invoked theatre as a model for politics both good and bad. In this 2001 study, Betsy Bolton examines the ways Romantic women performers and playwrights used theatrical conventions to intervene in politics. Reading the public performances of Emma Hamilton and Mary Robinson through the conventions of dramatic romance, Bolton suggests that the romance of national identity developed by writers such as Southey and Wordsworth took shape in complex opposition to these unruly women. Setting the conventions of farce against those of sentiment, playwrights such as Hannah Cowley and Elizabeth Inchbald questioned imperial relations while criticizing contemporary gender relations. This well-illustrated study draws on canonical poetry and personal memoirs, popular drama and parliamentary debates, political caricatures and theatrical reviews to extend current understandings of Romantic theatre, the public sphere, and Romantic gender relations.
Main Description
In the 1780s and 90s, theatre critics described the stage as a state in political tumult, while politicians invoked theatre as a model for politics both good and bad. In this study, Betsy Bolton examines the ways Romantic women performers and playwrights used theatrical conventions to intervene in politics. Reading the public performances of Emma Hamilton and Mary Robinson through the conventions of dramatic romance, Bolton suggests that the romance of national identity developed by writers such as Southey and Wordsworth took shape in complex opposition to these unruly women. Setting the conventions of farce against those of sentiment, playwrights such as Hannah Cowley and Elizabeth Inchbald questioned imperial relations while criticizing contemporary gender relations. This well-illustrated study draws on canonical poetry and personal memoirs, popular drama and parliamentary debates, political caricatures and theatrical reviews to extend current understandings of Romantic theatre, the public sphere, and Romantic gender relations.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Prologue: The female dramatist and the man of the people
Staging the Nation
The politics of Romantic theatre
Romancing the State: Public Men and Public Women
Varieties of Romance Nationalism
Patriotic romance: Emma Hamilton and Horation Nelson
(Dis)embodied romance: 'Perdita' Robinson and William Wordsworth
Mixed Drama, Imperial Farce
Mimicry, politics and playwrighting
The balance of power: Hannah Cowley's Day in Turkey
The farce of subjection: Elizabeth Inchbald
Epilogue: what is she?
Notes
Select bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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