Catalogue


Surveying instruments of Greece and Rome /
M.J.T. Lewis.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
description
xx, 389 p. : ill.
ISBN
0521792975
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
isbn
0521792975
catalogue key
4472435
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
M. J. T. Lewis is Senior Lecturer in Industrial Archaeology at the University of Hull
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The author has written a rich and detailed book illustrated with sixty-nine figures, but one that almost certainly will be restricted to a small readership of experts because of the need to use technical terminology and because of the detail and complexity of his discussion." Religious Studies Review
"The work is lavishly illustrated and diagramed and includes an ancient author index, regular index, and fourteen page bibliography of sources used to compile the material for the book. This meticulously developed history of science work is strongly recommended for museum and academic libraries with classical history or surveying/geomatics engineering holdings." E-Streams
"...this is a very important book....indispensible.....thoroughly researched, well referenced and brings to light a host of sources previously neglected....the most useful book on ancient surveying instruments and techniques that has come to light....a solid, straight-forward and honest...tool which will undoubtedly facilitate further advances in the field." Bryn Mawr Classical Review
"Lewis's writing is clear and direct, and his explanations easily understandable...The book is an interesting and informative read...a valuable addition to the literature on Greek and Roman engineering and technology." Technology and Culture
'I heartily recommend [Lewis]'s book as a model of integrated analysis relevant to many different aspects of the classical world.' Journal of Roman Studies
"Lewis draws on an impressive array of literary sources, plus archaeological evidence, later parallels, and his own trials with reconstructed versions of the dioptra and the libra, to trace the history, design, and capabilities of the instruments...Throughout this absorbing work, the level of scholarship is very high...Lewis writes engagingly, and his combination of first-rate scholarship and hands-on problem solving is irresistible." Isis
'I heartily recommend [Lewis]'s book as a model of integrated analysis relevant to many different aspects of the classical world.'Journal of Roman Studies
"...a dazzling combination of classical scholarship and pragmatic experimentation." Mechanical Engineering
"...a valuable contribution to the history of technology. The specialist will appreciate the author's boldness in the analysis of controversial issues and minutiae, while those interested in the general evolution of Greek and Roman engineering will benefit from a judicious discussion of much archaeological and literary evidence, as well as a historical overview." Classical World
"...excellent...Surveying Instruments of Greece and Rome is well written and well illustrated and serves to remind us that the science of surveying and measuring land is truly a cornerstone of civilization." Professional Surveyor
This item was reviewed in:
SciTech Book News, March 2002
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Summaries
Main Description
The Greeks and Romans achieved extraordinary feats of surveying in building their aqueducts, tunnels and roads and in measuring the circumference of the earth and the heights of mountains. This book, which contains translations of all the ancient texts on surveying instruments, including major sources hitherto untapped, sets out to reconstruct the instruments and to explain how they were used. The subject has never been tackled before in this detail, and a level of technical sophistication emerges which must count as one of the greatest achievements of the ancient world.
Description for Bookstore
This book contains translations of all the ancient texts on surveying, including major sources hitherto untapped. It sets out to reconstruct the instruments and to explain how they were used. A level of technical sophistication emerges, which must count as one of the greatest achievements of the ancient world.
Description for Library
The Greeks and Romans achieved extraordinary feats of surveying in building their aqueducts, tunnels and roads and in measuring the circumference of the earth and the heights of mountains. This book, which contains translations of all the ancient texts on surveying, including major sources hitherto untapped, sets out to reconstruct the instruments and to explain how they were used. The subject has never been tackled before in this detail, and a level of technical sophistication emerges which must count as one of the greatest achievements of the ancient world.
Main Description
The Greeks and, especially, the Romans are famous for the heroic engineering of their aqueducts, tunnels and roads. They also measured the circumference of the earth and the heights of mountains with fair precision. This book presents new translations (from Greek, Latin, Arabic, Hebrew and Syriac) of all the ancient texts concerning surveying, including major sources hitherto untapped. It explores the history of surveying instruments, notably the Greek dioptra and the Roman libra, and with the help of tests with reconstructions explains how they were used in practice. This is a subject which has never been tackled before in anything like this depth. The Greeks emerge as the pioneers of instrumental surveying and, though their equipment and methods were simple by modern standards, they and the Romans can be credited with a level of technical sophistication which must count as one of the greatest achievements of the ancient world.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume is a comprehensive account of ancient surveying instruments together with translations of all the ancient sources. It explores the history of surveying instruments and explains how they were used in practice.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Instruments and Methods
The basic elements
Background to the dioptra
The dioptra
The libra
The groma
The hodometer
Practical Applications
Measurement of the earth
Mountain heights
Canals and aqueducts
Tunnels
Roman roads
Epilogue
The Sources: The treatises
Other sources
Appendix. Uncertain devices
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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