Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

The Empire of chance : how probability changed science and everyday life /
Gerd Gigerenzer ... [et al.].
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1989.
description
xvii, 340 p. : ill. --
ISBN
0521331153
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
series title
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1989.
isbn
0521331153
catalogue key
4470885
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1989-12:
Written by a team of historians and philosophers, this volume is one of the results of a year-long research project on "The Probabilistic Revolution." Headquartered at the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies in Bielefeld, Federal Republic of Germany, the project has had as its primary product an impressive two-volume collection of essays (The Probabilistic Revolution, CH, Mar '89). This new book is a successful collaborative effort "to condense and connect" the essays into a single narrative that documents the applications of probability and statistics to science and life. The narrative begins with brief histories of the classical and statistical sides of probability, followed by investigations of four broad applications: experimental methodology, biology, physics, and psychology. Recurrent themes are determinism, inference, causality, free will, evidence, and the shifting meaning of probability relative to its application. The book is scholarly yet keeps the technical mathematics to a minimum, making it accessible to a broad audience at advanced undergraduate and graduate levels. An excellent set of references is included. -J. Johnson, Western Washington University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'The book provides a welcome introduction to the main historical themes of probability, statistics and inference. It is, at the same time, impressive in its range and subject-matter and in its depth of analysis.' The Times Higher Education Supplement
'The book provides a welcome introduction to the main historical themes of probability, statistics and inference. It is, at the same time, impressive in its range and subject-matter and in its depth of analysis.'The Times Higher Education Supplement
‘The book provides a welcome introduction to the main historical themes of probability, statistics and inference. It is, at the same time, impressive in its range and subject-matter and in its depth of analysis.’The Times Higher Education Supplement
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1989
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
The Empire of Chance tells how quantitative ideas of chance transformed the natural and social sciences, as well as daily life, in the last three centuries. It connects the earliest applications of probability and statistics in gambling and insurance to the most recent forays into law, medicine polling and baseball.
Main Description
The Empire of Chance tells how quantitative ideas of chance transformed the natural and social sciences, as well as daily life over the last three centuries. A continuous narrative connects the earliest application of probability and statistics in gambling and insurance to the most recent forays into law, medicine, polling and baseball. Separate chapters explore the theoretical and methodological impact in biology, physics and psychology. Themes recur - determinism, inference, causality, free will, evidence, the shifting meaning of probability - but in dramatically different disciplinary and historical contexts. In contrast to the literature on the mathematical development of probability and statistics, this book centres on how these technical innovations remade our conceptions of nature, mind and society. Written by an interdisciplinary team of historians and philosophers, this readable, lucid account keeps technical material to an absolute minimum. It is aimed not only at specialists in the history and philosophy of science, but also at the general reader and scholars in other disciplines.
Main Description
This book tells how quantitative ideas of chance have transformed the natural and social sciences as well as everyday life over the past three centuries. A continuous narrative connects the earliest application of probability and statistics in gambling and insurance to the most recent forays into law, medicine, polling, and baseball. Separate chapters explore the theoretical and methodological impact on biology, physics, and psychology. In contrast to the literature on the mathematical development of probability and statistics, this book centers on how these technical innovations recreated our conceptions of nature, mind, and society.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Classical probabilities, 1660+1840
Statistical probabilities, 1820+1900
The inference experts
Chance and life: controversies in modern biology
The probabilistic revolution in physics
Statistics of the mind
Numbers rule the world
The implications of chance
References
Name index
Subject index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem