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War and revolution : the United States and Russia, 1914-1921 /
Norman E. Saul.
imprint
Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, c2001.
description
xx, 483 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0700610901 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, c2001.
isbn
0700610901 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4467883
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Norman E. Saul is professor of history and Russian and East European studies at the University of Kansas.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-02-01:
This third of a three-volume series on Russian-American relations offers exquisite detail on the entire time frame, incorporating much recent scholarship. Coverage on the two revolutions in 1917 and the events in between is especially useful in clarifying details on the Root Mission and its relationship to the Kornilov affair. Helpful also are Saul's use of short, pointed summaries, which portray American Ambassador David Francis as "perplexed" and Washington as "befuddled" by the events in 1917. Some historians might argue that Saul (Univ. of Kansas) was too gentle on Francis, whose limited grasp of events forced Wilson and the government to rely on other experts. For the aftermath of the Bolshevik seizure of power, the author provides an equally arresting story line on Brest-Litovsk, the decision to intervene as well as the actual American intervention. Minor flaws exist, such as the duplicate use of a quote attributed first as anonymous and second to James A. Ruggles. Others may find that the most important threads of American policy and reactions, and the most influential of the American cadre, are left in the midst of the details for readers to discover. Excellent photographs throughout. A comprehensive and thoughtful treatment for all levels. C. W. Haury Piedmont Virginia Community College
Appeared in Library Journal on 2001-06-01:
Saul (history, Univ. of Kansas) here continues his series on the history of U.S.-Russian relations, begun with Distant Friends (1991) and Concord and Conflict (1996). The third title covers a shorter but unusually turbulent period that included World War I, the 1917 revolution, and Russia's subsequent civil war. Three concerns dominate the period: protecting the commercial and trade relationships, protecting U.S. citizens caught in Russia at the wrong time, and continuing war relief work. In its thorough and scholarly approach, this is comparable to John Lewis Gaddis's Russia, the Soviet Union and the United States (McGraw Hill, 1990. 2d ed.) or George F. Kennan's Soviet American Relations, 1917-1920 (Princeton Univ., 1956-58, 3 vols.). Saul has done extensive archival research, both in collections of official documents and in the personal papers of officials and private citizens. He quotes liberally from these documents, allowing those involved to speak with their own voices as they try to steer a safe course while the world collapses around them. Recommended primarily for academic libraries. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, June 2001
Choice, February 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
For Russia, it was a time of troubles: war, famine, and social upheaval the likes of which the world had never seen before. World War I, two revolutions in 1917, and the subsequent civil war and Allied intervention completely eradicated one regime and replaced it with a radically new one. Now an award-winning diplomatic historian ties these events together to reveal their far-reaching consequences for the future of not only the new Soviet Union but of the United States as well. In War and Revolution, Norman Saul offers a fresh analysis of this troubled era in Russia and of the American reaction to it. Tracing the events surrounding Americas entry into the European conflict and its encouragement of continued Russian participation even in the face of domestic unrest, he shows how those circumstances adversely affected relations between two nations and shaped their futures in the century ahead. Drawing on rarely accessed military and diplomatic archives in both countries, Saul reaches beyond official actions to give readers a vivid sense of those times. He surveys the vast panorama of events while providing not only detailed accounts of the activities of consular, diplomatic, and military staffs but also colorful vignettes of ordinary Americans in Russia involved in humanitarian relief and other activities. Businessmen and artists, Red Cross volunteers and journalists-all were caught up in the immediacy of war and revolution, and all contributed to the shifting sentiments of two nations. War and Revolution is the third volume in Sauls sweeping history of U.S.-Russian relations, already hailed for setting "a new standard for how the history of international relations ought to be written" (TLS). Here he further develops the theme of "mirror-imaging," describing ways in which Americans and Russians saw themselves as having a common relationship distinguished from other European or Asian nations. Despite the turmoil of this era, he explains, Russians continued to look to America for ideas and models while Americans expected Russians to follow their lead in developing resources and reforming institutions. By 1921, Americans were in a quandary about Russia as its former friend pursued a hostile course beyond U.S. control. Sauls account of those years clearly shows how this parting of the ways came about-and how it set the stage for a cold war that would test both countrys wills later in the century.
Unpaid Annotation
For Russia, it was a time of troubles: war, famine, and social upheaval the likes of which the world had never seen before. World War I, two revolutions in 1917, and the subsequent civil war and Allied intervention completely eradicated one regime and replaced it with a radically new one. Now an award-winning diplomatic historian ties these events together to reveal their far-reaching consequences for the future of not only the new Soviet Union but of the United States as well.In War and Revolution, Norman Saul offers a fresh analysis of this troubled era in Russia and of the American reaction to it. Tracing the events surrounding America's entry into the European conflict and its encouragement of continued Russian participation even in the face of domestic unrest, he shows how those circumstances adversely affected relations between two nations and shaped their futures in the century ahead.Drawing on rarely accessed military and diplomatic archives in both countries, Saul reaches beyond official actions to give readers a vivid sense of those times. He surveys the vast panorama of events while providing not only detailed accounts of the activities of consular, diplomatic, and military staffs but also colorful vignettes of ordinary Americans in Russia involved in humanitarian relief and other activities. Businessmen and artists, Red Cross volunteers and journalists -- all were caught up in the immediacy of war and revolution, and all contributed to the shifting sentiments of two nations.War and Revolution is the third volume in Saul's sweeping history of U.S.-Russian relations, already hailed for setting "a new standard for how the history of international relations ought to bewritten" (TLS). Here he further develops the theme of "mirror-imaging", describing ways in which Americans and Russians saw themselves as having a common relationship distinguished from other European or Asian nations. Despi
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Technical Notesp. xvii
Abbreviations Used in Notesp. xix
Warp. 1
Revolutionp. 59
Alliancep. 103
Soviet Powerp. 177
Vologdap. 237
Interventionp. 309
Reliefp. 377
Conclusionp. 443
Bibliographyp. 447
Indexp. 467
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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