Catalogue


The complete Justine, Philosophy in the bedroom, and other writings /
The Marquis de Sade ; compiled and translated by Richard Seaver and Austryn Wainhouse ; with introductions by Jean Paulhan of l'Academie Fran├žaise and Maurice Blanchot.
imprint
New York : Grove Press, 1966, c1965.
description
xvi, 752 p. --
ISBN
0802141714
format(s)
Book
Holdings
  • In
    Restricted or Protected Material
    PQ2063 .S3 A275 1966 RESTRICTED SHELF
    Browse Shelf
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Brett D. Fromson was chief markets writer for TheStreet.com. Previously, he covered Wall Street and finance for The Washington Post and Fortune magazine. Fromson is the general partner of The Margin of Safety Fund. His work has also appeared in The Economist, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Monthly
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2003-08-11:
This brief chronicle details the machinations that brought the first casino to Connecticut and enormous wealth to a downtrodden Indian tribe. The Pequot Indians were near oblivion when one Pequot, Skip Hayward, a failed clam-shack owner with nothing left to lose, returned to the Ledyard, Conn., reservation to revive the tribe. With the help of shrewd pro bono lawyers, Hayward successfully landed federal assistance for Pequot reservation housing, but his biggest coup came when lawyers for the Pequots were able to settle a federal land claim suit that legitimized them as a tribe, allowing them to skirt a federal vetting process. This paved the way for the Pequots, situated perfectly between New York and Boston, to open a profitable bingo hall. They then expertly crafted and won a brilliant legal argument for a casino and, with the help of Malaysian investors, opened Foxwoods, Connecticut's first casino, in 1992. Amazingly, in little over a decade the tribe went from a few impoverished members to running a casino that grossed $158-million, with a $51-million profit, in its first year. Naturally, there were some problems: racial discord grew within the tribe as their numbers swelled to over 600, and competing casinos later cut into Foxwoods' success. Fromson, a journalist with TheStreet.com, has written a reliable account of the Pequots' financial ascent, though his brisk narrative often reads too much like an expanded newspaper story and is short on insight. Still, he ably captures the social, political and legal processes expertly finessed by the Pequots in making Foxwoods a reality. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Summaries
Main Description
In 1635, the first Puritans migrated from Massachusetts Bay to the Colony of Connecticut. By 1637, Puritan settlers in Connecticut were at war with the Pequot Indian tribe. In retaliation for a Pequot raid, Captain John Mason led an assembled militia of English and Indian allies in a pre-dawn attack on a Pequot fort that left over four hundred Pequots dead. Within two years, the Pequot tribe was all but extinguished, and would remain that way for the next three hundred and fifty years. Then in 1973, the last remaining descendent of the Pequots to live on the tribal reservation, Elizabeth George Plouffe, passed away, but not before imparting advice to her grandson Richard "Skip" Haywood: "Hold onto the land." These words would manifest themselves into an almost thirty year legal and political drama that would lead Hayward and his relatives to recreate the Pequot tribe and become the richest Indians in history. How it happened is the subject of Brett Duval Fromsons Hitting the Jackpot. The culmination of a three-year investigation, Fromson uncovers a labyrinthine tale of legal maneuverings, back room political dealings, and ethnic reinvention. Fromson details the step-by-step process by which todays Pequots gained tribal recognition, hired top lawyers to claim thousands of acres of land, exploited a state law meant for church yard sales to gain the right to open Foxwoods, now a $1.2 billion dollar a year operation, and distilled the barest traces of Pequot lineage into a full-fledged tribe with over 600 new tribal members, a yearly pow-wow that offers the biggest cash prizes in America and a $250 million museum, one of the costliest in American history. As controversy over Indian casino gambling sweeps across the United States, Hitting the Jackpot reveals the true story of how the Mashantucket Pequots of Connecticut became the richest Indian tribe in history.
Unpaid Annotation
From Connecticut and Maine to California, the explosion of Indian tribes with massive gambling operations has prompted a fierce nationwide debate. Hitting the Jackpot reveals the true story of how the Mashantucket Pequots of Connecticut became the richest Indian tribe in history.The culmination of a three-year investigation, Fromson uncovers a labyrinthine tale of legal maneuverings, back-room political dealings, and ethnic reinvention. Fromson details the step-by-step process by which today's Pequots gained tribal recognition, hired top lawyers to claim thousands of acres of land, exploited a state law meant for church yard sales to gain the right to open Foxwoods, now a $1.2 billion-a-year operation, and distilled the barest traces of Pequot lineage into a full-fledged tribe with over six hundred new tribal members, a yearly pow-wow that offers the biggest cash prizes in America, and a $250 million museum, one of the costliest in American history.
Unpaid Annotation
Fromson uncovers a labyrinthine tale of legal maneuverings, back room political dealings, and ethnic reinvention that led to the Pequot Indian tribe bringing casino gambling to Connecticut.
Main Description
In 1635, the first Puritans migrated from Massachusetts Bay to the Colony of Connecticut. By 1637, Puritan settlers in Connecticut were at war with the Pequot Indian tribe. In retaliation for a Pequot raid, Captain John Mason led an assembled militia of English and Indian allies in a pre-dawn attack on a Pequot fort that left over four hundred Pequots dead. Within two years, the Pequot tribe was all but extinguished, and would remain that way for the next three hundred and fifty years. Then in 1973, the last remaining descendent of the Pequots to live on the tribal reservation, Elizabeth George Plouffe, passed away, but not before imparting advice to her grandson Richard "Skip" Haywood: "Hold onto the land." These words would manifest themselves into an almost thirty year legal and political drama that would lead Hayward and his relatives to recreate the Pequot tribe and become the richest Indians in history. How it happened is the subject of Brett Duval Fromson's Hitting the Jackpot. The culmination of a three-year investigation, Fromson uncovers a labyrinthine tale of legal maneuverings, back room political dealings, and ethnic reinvention. Fromson details the step-by-step process by which today's Pequots gained tribal recognition, hired top lawyers to claim thousands of acres of land, exploited a state law meant for church yard sales to gain the right to open Foxwoods, now a $1.2 billion dollar a year operation, and distilled the barest traces of Pequot lineage into a full-fledged tribe with over 600 new tribal members, a yearly pow-wow that offers the biggest cash prizes in America and a $250 million museum, one of the costliest in American history. As controversy over Indian casino gambling sweeps across the United States, Hitting the Jackpot reveals the true story of how the Mashantucket Pequots of Connecticut became the richest Indian tribe in history.
Short Annotation
From Connecticut and Maine to California, the explosion of Indian tribes with massive gambling operations has prompted a fierce nationwide debate. Hitting the Jackpot reveals the true story of how the Mashantucket Pequots of Connecticut became the richest Indian tribe in history.
Table of Contents
Defeat and Decayp. 1
Reinventionp. 19
Tntp. 29
Land Claimp. 37
Housesp. 43
Negotiationsp. 49
Developmentp. 55
Settlementp. 59
Bingo!p. 73
The Lawyer and the Builderp. 77
Financingp. 83
Second-Class Pequotsp. 91
The Compactp. 101
Weickerp. 109
Las Vegas Nightsp. 115
The Malaysiansp. 121
Foxwoodsp. 129
Annexationp. 141
Dividing the Spoilsp. 149
Spending Spreep. 161
Schemitzunp. 173
Museump. 177
Growing Painsp. 191
Crisisp. 201
Abusep. 211
The Dreamp. 219
Acknowledgmentsp. 225
Sourcesp. 227
Timelinep. 243
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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