Catalogue


The demography of Roman Egypt /
Roger S. Bagnall and Bruce W. Frier.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
description
xix, 354 p. : ill.
ISBN
0521461235
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
isbn
0521461235
catalogue key
440739
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-02:
Taking their cue from Keith Hopkins's pioneering study "Brother-Sister Marriage in Roman Egypt" (Comparative Studies in Society and History 22, 1980, 303-354), in which were applied for the first time to ancient census returns the sophisticated modeling techniques used by modern demographers when they analyze imperfect data, Bagnall (Columbia Univ.) and Frier (Univ. of Michigan) extend the approach, applying it to nearly 300 census returns from the first three centuries of the Christian era in Roman Egypt. The attempt is to recreate "a more or less typical Mediterranean population" in existence a couple of millennia ago. Although readers should be "duly cautious" as the authors extrapolate from Roman Egypt to the broader Roman world, nevertheless "the basic demographic attributes" rendered from the documents are "thoroughly at home" in the Mediterranean. "What stands out about Roman Egypt," we are told, "is ... not its oddness but its conformity". The book, accordingly, is of interest to a broad range of historians of the ancient world: historical demographers, obviously, as well as social and family historians. The book bears the imprimatur of Ansley J. Coale, Office of Population Research, Princeton University, who pronounces it "an exciting increase in our knowledge". Upper-division undergraduate and graduate collections. T. C. Hartman; University of WisconsinDSSuperior
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1995
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Summaries
Main Description
The traditional demographic regime of ancient Greece and Rome is almost entirely unknown; but our best chance for understanding its characteristics is provided by the three hundred census returns that survive on papyri from Roman Egypt. These returns, which date from the first three centuries AD, list the members of ordinary households living in the Nile valley: not only family members, but lodgers and slaves. The Demography of Roman Egypt has a complete and accurate catalogue of all demographically relevant information contained in the returns. On the basis of this catalogue, the authors use modern demographic methods and models to reconstruct the patterns of mortality, marriage, fertility and migration that are likely to have prevailed in Roman Egypt. They recreate a more or less typical Mediterranean population as it survived and prospered nearly two millennia ago.
Description for Library
This book reconstructs the demographic regime in Roman Egypt during the first three centuries AD, using as its main evidence the three hundred surviving census returns filed by ordinary declarants. On the basis of this catalogue, the authors use modern demographic methods and models to reconstruct the patterns of mortality, marriage, fertility and migration that are likely to have prevailed in Roman Egypt. This is the first book that goes beyond the usual literary and legal sources to recreate life and death as they were actually experienced.
Description for Bookstore
This book reconstructs the demographic regime in Roman Egypt during the first three centuries AD, using as its main evidence the three hundred surviving census returns filed by ordinary declarants. The authors use modern demographic methods and models to reconstruct the patterns of mortality, marriage, fertility and migration that are likely to have prevailed in Roman Egypt.
Table of Contents
Foreword
The census returns
The census returns as demographic evidence
Households
Female life expectancy
Male life expectancy and the sex ratio
Marriage
Fertility
Migration
Conclusions
Catalogue of Census declarations
Appendices
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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