Catalogue

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English merchant shipping, 1460-1540.
Burwash, Dorothy
imprint
[Toronto] : University of Toronto Press, [1947].
description
xii, 259 p., [5] leaves of plates : ill., map. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0802050018
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
[Toronto] : University of Toronto Press, [1947].
isbn
0802050018
general note
Originally presented as the author's thesis (doctoral--Bryn Mawr)
catalogue key
4405470
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 237-249) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2005-10-01:
In the introduction to his edited volume On Thomas Chandler Haliburton (1979), Davies (Acadia Univ., Nova Scotia) called for a "full-scale biography and re-evaluation of [Haliburton's] work." Now, having since edited The Letters of Thomas Chandler Haliburton (1988) and The Haliburton Bi-centenary Chaplet (1997)--the proceedings of a conference on the author--Davies produces a biography of the man he calls "the most important (and certainly the most successful) literary figure from Canada's pre-Confederation era." The author emphasizes the contradictions of the self-styled English Tory whose most famous creation is Sam Slick, a character Davies describes as "a Yankee clockmaker who berated the somnolent Nova Scotians." Davies knows his material thoroughly, and he does not shy away from commenting on Haliburton's racism. This leads him to concede that those wishing to anthologize Haliburton will be "hard pressed to find a passage of The Clockmaker that will not offend [present day] sensibilities." This problem suggests one of the book's difficulties; its other shortcoming is that the brevity of the chapters--perhaps in the interest of facilitating research--robs the book of continuity. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Extensive collections serving those interested in Canadian literature; upper-division undergraduates through faculty. T. Ware Queen's University at Kingston
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Books in Canada, May 2005
Books in Canada, August 2005
Choice, October 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Reader
Thomas Chandler Haliburton (1796-1865) was one of pre-confederation Canada's best-known authors. His popular 'Sam Slick the Clockmaker' character was a household name not only in his home country, but also in England and the United States.Born in Windsor, Nova Scotia, Haliburton was not only a writer, but also a lawyer, judge, politician, and historian. He gained fame for his writing in 1836 with The Clockmaker: or, the Sayings and Doings of Samuel Slick of Slickvillefor a Halifax newspaper. It became a hit in England and was followed by six sequels. Although Haliburton tried to put Sam Slick aside and work in other genres, he found himself invariably returning to the character in his later books. This commitment to Slick resulted in a curious effacement of Haliburton's own personal gentlemanly identity, which he spent the second half of his life affirming by fostering links with socially well connected family in England. In the public imagination, however, he remained linked with Sam Slick.Based on over ten years of archival research, Richard A. Davies's scholarly biography of Haliburton is the first since 1924. It is an engaging examination of a controversial and contradictory Canadian writer and significant figure in the history of pre-confederation Nova Scotia.
Description for Reader
Thomas Chandler Haliburton (1796A?1865) was one of pre-confederation Canada's best-known authors. His popular 'Sam Slick the Clockmaker' character was a household name not only in his home country, but also in England and the United States. Born in Windsor, Nova Scotia, Haliburton was not only a writer, but also a lawyer, judge, politician, and historian. He gained fame for his writing in 1836 with The Clockmaker: or, the Sayings and Doings of Samuel Slick of Slickvillefor a Halifax newspaper. It became a hit in England and was followed by six sequels. Although Haliburton tried to put Sam Slick aside and work in other genres, he found himself invariably returning to the character in his later books. This commitment to Slick resulted in a curious effacement of Haliburton's own personal gentlemanly identity, which he spent the second half of his life affirming by fostering links with socially well connected family in England. In the public imagination, however, he remained linked with Sam Slick. Based on over ten years of archival research, Richard A. Davies's scholarly biography of Haliburton is the first since 1924. It is an engaging examination of a controversial and contradictory Canadian writer and significant figure in the history of pre-confederation Nova Scotia.
Main Description
Thomas Chandler Haliburton (1796?1865) was one of pre-confederation Canada's best-known authors. His popular 'Sam Slick the Clockmaker' character was a household name not only in his home country, but also in England and the United States. Born in Windsor, Nova Scotia, Haliburton was not only a writer, but also a lawyer, judge, politician, and historian. He gained fame for his writing in 1836 with The Clockmaker: or, the Sayings and Doings of Samuel Slick of Slickville for a Halifax newspaper. It became a hit in England and was followed by six sequels. Although Haliburton tried to put Sam Slick aside and work in other genres, he found himself invariably returning to the character in his later books. This commitment to Slick resulted in a curious effacement of Haliburton's own personal gentlemanly identity, which he spent the second half of his life affirming by fostering links with socially well connected family in England. In the public imagination, however, he remained linked with Sam Slick. Based on over ten years of archival research, Richard A. Davies's scholarly biography of Haliburton is the first since 1924. It is an engaging examination of a controversial and contradictory Canadian writer and significant figure in the history of pre-confederation Nova Scotia.

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