Catalogue


The cult of Saint Thecla : a tradition of women's piety in late antiquity /
Stephen J. Davis.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2001.
description
xiv, 258 p. : ill., facsims., maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0198270194
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2001.
isbn
0198270194
catalogue key
4402040
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [209]-246) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
Davis has brought together the Egyptian source material for the first time ... a fascinating and cogently-argued book.
Davis is to be congratulated for setting out the results of his research not only because this includes fully referenced footnotes and extensive bibliographical details, but because he has made his story interesting and readable.
Davis's welcome monograph goes a long way toward filling sizeable scholarly gaps.
... meticulously researched and elegantly written ... the strength and broader significance of the work lie largely in its more comprehensive scope and its methodological subtlety and versatility ... This engaging book will be of interest to all scholars of ancient Christianity concerned with the figure of Thecla, practices of female piety, the cults of saints and rites of pilgrimage, the production of hagiographical literature, and the broader processes of cultural translation and translocation in late antiquity.
Scholarly and erudite throughout, this study engages with diverse debates ... it will be valued and judged chiefly for its skilful integration of literary, archaeological, material, papyrological and Coptic evidence.
... the book is an important contribution to the field of early Christian studies, particularly for scholars of asceticism or those seeking models of interdisciplinary research.
"This is a welcome study in English of a widespread early Church tradition, most of whose scholarship is in German. This is a fascinating addition to our knowledge of the Thelca cult...a valuable contribution."--Journal of Early Christian Studies
"This is a welcome study in English of a widespread early Church tradition, most of whose scholarship is in German. This is a fascinating addition to our knowledge of the Thelca cult...a valuable contribution."-- Journal of Early Christian Studies
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Thecla, a disciple of the apostle Paul, became perhaps the most celebrated female saint & 'martyr' in the early church. Bringing together a wide range of evidence, Davis shows how the cult of Saint Thecla was popular among early Christian women.
Long Description
Thecla, a disciple of the apostle Paul, became perhaps the most celebrated female saint and 'martyr' among Christians in late antiquity. In the early church, Thecla's example was associated with the piety of women - in particular, with women's ministry and travel. Devotion to Saint Thecla quickly spread throughout the Mediterranean world: her image was painted on walls of tombs, stamped on clay flasks and oil lamps, engraved on bronze crosses and wooden combs, and even woven into textile curtains. Bringing together literary, artistic, and archaeological evidence, often for the first time, Stephen Davis here reconstructs the cult of Saint Thecla in Asia Minor and Egypt - the social practices, institutions, and artefacts that marked the lives of actual devotees. From this evidence the author shows how the cult of this female saint remained closely linked with communities of women as a source of empowerment and a cause of controversy.
Long Description
Thecla, a disciple of the apostle Paul, was perhaps the most celebrated female saint and 'martyr' among Christians in late antiquity. In examining the practices of Thecla's devotees in Asia Minor and Egypt, Stephen Davis shows that Thecla's cult was closely linked with communities of women as a means of empowerment.
Main Description
'Davis has brought together the Egyptian source material for the first time... a fascinating and cogently-argued book' -Journal of Theological StudiesThecla, a disciple of the apostle Paul, became perhaps the most celebrated female saint and 'martyr' in the early church. Bringing together literary, artistic, and archaeological evidence, the author shows how the cult of Saint Thecla was especially popular among early Christian women.
Main Description
Thecla, a disciple of the apostle Paul, became perhaps the most celebrated female saint and 'martyr' among Christians in late antiquity. In the early church, Thecla's example was associated with the piety of women - in particular, with women's ministry and travel. Devotion to Saint Theclaquickly spread throughout the Mediterranean world: her image was painted on walls of tombs, stamped on clay flasks and oil lamps, engraved on bronze crosses and wooden combs, and even woven into textile curtains. Bringing together literary, artistic, and archaeological evidence, often for the firsttime, Stephen Davis here reconstructs the cult of Saint Thecla in Asia Minor and Egypt - the social practices, institutions, and artefacts that marked the lives of actual devotees. From this evidence the author shows how the cult of this female saint remained closely linked with communities ofwomen as a source of empowerment and a cause of controversy.
Table of Contents
List of Figures
Abbreviations
The Cult of Saint Thecla in Asia Minorp. 1
Origins of the Thecla Cultp. 3
The Cult of Thecla at Seleucia in Asia Minorp. 36
The Cult of Saint Thecla in Egyptp. 81
Thecla Devotion Among Ascetic Women in Alexandriap. 83
Pilgrimage and the Cult of Saint Thecla in the Mareotisp. 113
The Spread of Thecla Devotion Outside Alexandria and Its Environsp. 149
A Catalogue of Published Ampullae with Saint Theclap. 195
Namesakes of Saint Thecla in Late Antique Egyptp. 201
Figuresp. 209
Bibliographyp. 239
Indexp. 277
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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