Catalogue


An early Florida adventure story /
by Fray Andrés de San Miguel ; translated by John H. Hann ; foreword by James J. Miller.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2001.
description
xiii, 109 p. : map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0813018765 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2001.
isbn
0813018765 (alk. paper)
general note
Translated from "Dos antiguas relaciones de la Florida" published by Genaro García (1902)--Publisher's note.
catalogue key
4393360
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-07-01:
Dangerous storms at sea, ships colliding at the height of a tempest, a conspiracy by ruthless crew members to seize all escape rafts and leave behind their comrades to sink and die, drifting for weeks along the Gulf Stream with little food and no water, marooned on the sun-baked shores of Florida, encounters with mysterious natives, rescue finally by fellow countrymen from St. Augustine, and face to face tussles with heretical Englishmen on both sides of the Atlantic! What more could one put into a late-16th-century adventure story to attract readers? Hann has given us a new and vigorous translation of Andres de Segura's (Fray Andres de San Miguel) story entitled Relacion de los trabajos que la gente de una nao lamada Nuestra Senora de la Merced padecio y de algunas cosas que en aquella flota sucedieron, covering the years 1595-96 and unpublished in any language until 1902. Scholars interested in the nitty-gritty of translating will find plenty to question and ponder. Teachers interested in getting students excited about the earliest history of Florida, the Caribbean, and North America can do no better than assign this work as required reading. All collections. J. A. Lewis Western Carolina University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Among documents of Florida's Spanish colonial period, few eyewitness accounts exist. One of these, the 1595 narrative by Fray Andres de San Miguel, expertly translated by John Hann, describes the two-year odyssey of a teenager from Spain across the Atlantic to Mexico, Havana, and Florida and finally back to Spain. The future friar's account of his experiences as a young sailor brings to life the fleets of the Golden Age of Spain and reveals how those adventures would change his life forever.After Andres's ship passed Cape Canaveral, it was battered by a four-day storm and separated from the fleet. The officers commandeered the only launch and escaped; the crew kept the ship afloat and improvised a box-like vessel in which 30 survivors reached shore near the mouth of the Altamaha River. The author offers detailed descriptions of the Guale Indians and of Mission San Pedro Mocama on Cumberland Island. He also provides vignettes of life in St. Augustine and, on his way to Havana, of encounters with South Florida Indians. The adventure closes with Fray Andres' return to Cadiz, where he witnessed the 1596 British siege and burning of that port.Only seventeen years old at the time of the voyage, Fray Andres presents a cold-eyed view of the sailing experience in the 16th century, trenchant observations on the behavior of the ship's officers and the circumstances of the survival of the crew, and insight into the ambitions, concerns, and religiosity of the Spaniards. The book includes Hann's translation of a brief introductory essay written by Fray Andres' Mexican publisher, telling of the young man's entry into the Carmelites and the accomplishments of his later life as a church architect,builder, and hydrographic expert involved in the drainage of the valley of Mexico City.
Description for Bookstore
"This book belongs in the library of anyone with an interest in the Spanish period in Georgia and Florida, both as a reference and as a good read for armchair historians and aficionados of maritime history."-- John E. Worth, author of The Timucuan Chiefdoms of Spanish Florida "An exciting 16th-century shipwreck story. . . . On another level, the narrative provides rare glimpses of the ethnology of the Mocama/Guale Native Americans and fascinating details of life aboard Spanish ships and at colonial St. Augustine."-- Eugene Lyon, author of The Enterprise of Florida and The Search for the Atocha Among documents of Florida's Spanish colonial period, few eyewitness accounts exist. One of these, the 1595 narrative by Fray Andrés de San Miguel, expertly translated by John Hann, describes the two-year odyssey of a teenager from Spain across the Atlantic to Mexico, Havana, and Florida and finally back to Spain. The future friar's account of his experiences as a young sailor brings to life the fleets of the Golden Age of Spain and reveals how those adventures would change his life forever. It also provides vivid information about the Indians of the Georgia and Florida coast. After Andrés's ship passed Cape Canaveral, it was battered by a four-day storm and separated from the fleet. The officers commandeered the only launch and escaped; the crew kept the ship afloat and improvised a box-like vessel in which 30 survivors reached shore near the mouth of the Altamaha River--more dead than alive for lack of food and water. The author offers detailed descriptions of the Guale Indians and of Mission San Pedro Mocama on Cumberland Island. He also provides vignettes of life in St. Augustine and, on his way to Havana, of encounters with South Florida Indians who came out to trade and with a gentlemanly English pirate. The adventure closes with Fray Andrés' return to Cadiz, where he witnessed the 1596 British siege and burning of that port. Only seventeen years old at the time of the voyage, Fray Andrés presents a cold-eyed view of the sailing experience in the 16th century, trenchant observations on the behavior of the ship's officers and the circumstances of the survival of the crew, and insight into the ambitions, concerns, and religiosity of the Spaniards. The book includes Hann's translation of a brief introductory essay written by Fray Andrés' Mexican publisher, telling of the young man's entry into the Carmelites and the accomplishments of his later life as a church architect, builder, and hydrographic expert involved in the drainage of the valley of Mexico City. John H. Hann is site historian at the San Luis Archaeological and Historic Site in Tallahassee. He is the author of A History of the Timucuan Indians and Missions (UPF, 1996), Missions to the Calusa (UPF, 1991), and many other books and articles.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem