Catalogue

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Write or be written : early modern women poets and cultural constraints /
edited by Barbara Smith and Ursula Appelt.
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, Vt. : Ashgate Pub., c2001.
description
xxiii, 281 p. : ill.
ISBN
184014288X (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, Vt. : Ashgate Pub., c2001.
isbn
184014288X (alk. paper)
general note
Series statement from jacket.
catalogue key
4383945
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ursula Appelt is an Assistant Professor of English literature at the State University of New York, Stony Brook. Margaret J. M. Ezell is the John Paul Abbott Professor of Liberal Arts at Texas AandM University. Pamela Hammons is currently an Assistant Professor of English literature at the University of Central Florida. Margaret P. Hannay, Professor of English Literature at Siena College, Clare R. Kinney is Associate Professor of English at the University of Virginia. Joan Pong Linton is Associate Professor of English at Indiana University Jeslyn Medoff teaches American and British literature at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Shannon Miller is an Associate Professor of English at Temple University. Jacqueline Pearson is Professor of English Literature at the University of Manchester, England. Bronwen Price is senior lecturer in English at Portsmouth University, England. Anne Russell is Associate Professor of English at Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Canada. Andrew Shifflett is Assistant Professor of English at the University of South Carolina, Barbara Smith is Associate Professor of English at the College of Mount Saint Vincent in Riverdale, New York. Helen Wilcox is Professor of English Literature at the University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-11-01:
Appelt (SUNY, Stony Brook) and Smith (College of Mount Saint Vincent), both with previous work in historiography and representations of women in Renaissance poetry, have produced a useful volume of essays thematically centered on connections between "poetry and culture, women and constraint." Many female poets represented in this collection have been discussed in a wealth of essays and books over the last two decades; works by Beilen, Lewalski, and Josephine Roberts come most readily to mind. Although indebted to these works, this volume goes one step further to examine "the self-conscious manipulation of cultural norms and prejudices by women poets." For example, Margaret Hannay studies Anne Lock's sonnet sequence meditation on Psalm 51 and Mary Sidney's translation of the Psalms both in the early modern religious cultural context of daily meditations on and singing of the Psalms and within the social constraints that encouraged women to concern themselves with Christian translation and paraphrase. Essays considering less known female poets Damaris Masham and Katherine Austen are welcome additions, as is the final essay by Jeslyn Medoff on early biographies of Aphra Behn. All academic collections. D. Aldrich-Watson University of Missouri--St. Louis
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2001
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The essays in this volume reflect today's critical thinking, and represent a broad range of approaches and methodologies. Topics covered include female discursive strategies, religious discourses and gender and writing a female space.
Long Description
Although the field of early modern women's studies has blossomed in recent years, little attention has been paid to women poets of the period. This new collection is specifically designed to fill the gap, applying new critical methodologies and theories to this group of early modern writers. Write or Be Written also contributes to ongoing debates about canonicity, periodicity, disciplinarity, and the construction of knowledge.The essays in this volume reflect today's sophisticated critical thinking, and represent a broad range of approaches and methodologies. Topics covered include contextualizing the self; female discursive strategies; religious discourses and gender; writing a female space; negotiating power and desire; female writing and the marketplace/publishing; and revisions of male-dominated poetic conventions and traditions.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. ix
Strategies and Contextsp. 1
Widow, Prophet, and Poet: Lyrical Self-Figurations in Katherine Austen's 'Book M' (1664)p. 3
'Public' and 'Private' in Aphra Behn's Miscellanies: Women Writers, Print, and Manuscriptp. 29
'Household Affaires are the Opium of the Soul': Damaris Masham and the Necessity of Women's Poetryp. 49
Poetic Conventions and Traditionsp. 67
Mary Wroth's Guilty 'secrett art': The Poetics of Jealousy in Pamphilia to Amphilanthusp. 69
'An Emblem of Themselves, in Plum or Pear': Poetry, the Female Body and the Country Housep. 87
'So May I With the Psalmist Truly Say': Early Modern Englishwomen's Psalm Discoursep. 105
Negotiating Power and Politicsp. 135
The Plural Voices of Anne Askewp. 137
Mary Sidney and Gendered Strategies for the Writing of Poetryp. 155
'Subdu'd by You': States of Friendship and Friends of the State in Katherine Philips's Poetryp. 177
Writing the Female Poetp. 197
'First Fruits of a Woman's Wit': Authorial Self-Construction of English Renaissance Women Poetsp. 199
A Rhetoric of Innocence: The Poetry of Katherine Philips, 'The Matchless Orinda'p. 223
'Very Like a Fiction': Some Early Biographies of Aphra Behnp. 247
Notes on Contributorsp. 271
Indexp. 275
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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