Catalogue


American policy and Northern Ireland : a saga of peacebuilding /
Joseph E. Thompson.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2001.
description
xxvi, 250 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0275965171 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2001.
isbn
0275965171 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4376233
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Joseph E. Thompson is Associate Professor of Political Science at Villanova University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Examines the U.S. role--both governmental and that of Irish-Americans--in attempting to bring a resolution to the strife in Northern Ireland. Thompson concentrates on the efforts since 1967, particularly the growth of American efforts to become the central humanitarian player in the peace process.
Long Description
Thompson examines the U.S. role--both governmental and that of Irish-Americans--in attempting to bring a resolution to the strife in Northern Ireland. He concentrates on the efforts since 1967, particularly the growth of American efforts to become the central humanitarian player in the peace process. The U.S. government stance was initially one of strict non-involvement. However, in the aftermath of Vietnam and Watergate, diminished White House authority encouraged Irish-American groups to challenge the traditional Irish policy. Movement away from strict non-involvement began with Congressional concern for the rising specter of Irish-American anger at the treatment of northern Irish Catholics. An important transition to humanitarian policy occurred during the Reagan Administration. Contributing factors that helped the U.S. government take a new direction in foreign policy were America's failure to respond to the escalation of Northern Ireland violence, a strong personal ethnic tie between the U.S. President and Speaker of the House O'Neill, a personal link between President Reagan and Prime Minister Thatcher, and intense lobbying by Irish-Americans and the Irish government. After a brief period of silent diplomacy during the Bush administration, the Clinton administration succeeded in a public blitz to endorse steps necessary to bring peace closer.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Abbreviationsp. xv
Introductionp. xvii
The Irish in Americap. 1
The Policy of Least Resistance: The Nixon Years (1969-August 1974)p. 19
An Awakening Giant: The Ford Years (August 1974-1976)p. 49
A Humanitarian Touchstone: The Carter Years (1977-1980)p. 71
A New Policy Direction: The First Reagan Administration (1981-1984)p. 97
The Policy of Accommodation: The Second Reagan Administration (1985-1988)p. 123
Commitment to Continuity: The Bush Years (1989-1992)p. 143
The Peace Process: The First Clinton Administration (1993-1996)p. 163
Brinkmanship: The Second Clinton Administration (1997-2000)p. 191
Epiloguep. 217
U.S. Foreign Service Officers in Belfast, 1796-2000p. 233
Bibliographyp. 235
Indexp. 243
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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