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The intellectual life of the British working classes /
Jonathan Rose.
imprint
New Haven, CT : Yale University Press, c2001.
description
ix, 534 p.
ISBN
0300088868
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Haven, CT : Yale University Press, c2001.
isbn
0300088868
catalogue key
4364253
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jonathan Rose is Professor of History at Drew University and founder of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
British Academy Book Prize, GBR, 2002 : Nominated
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-02-01:
This wonderful book splendidly recaptures the reading experience of the British working classes. Covering the 18th, but concentrating on the 19th and first half of the 20th centuries, the book recovers from innumerable published and unpublished accounts by readers themselves--and without either sentimentality or trendy leftism--the experiences of these mostly forgotten autodidacts. Here we have a keen sense of the pleasure and self-improvement that infused their reading. We relive their experience of the text and discover that these readers were not very interested in the Empire, but were more engrossed with accounts of the Holy Land and the US. With some justification, Rose (Drew Univ.) attacks the elitism of Bloomsbury, summed up in E.M. Forster's negative attitude toward his character Leonard Bast reading Ruskin, who in fact acted as a liberating figure for many a working-class reader. Examples, including important tables, are presented by topic--a reasonable choice, but one that weakens the sense of how the working-class reader, male and female, changed. Rose ultimately gives in too easily to the view that the sturdy British working-class reader has disappeared, but this does not lessen the considerable accomplishment of this study. All collections and levels. P. Stansky Stanford University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[E]ven the weariest cultural warrior will have to make room for Jonathan Rose's Intellectual Life of the British Working Classes. . . . a passionate work of history that brings alive the forgotten people on whose behalf so much academic hot air is routinely expended."-Daniel Akst, Wall Street Journal
"[E]ven the weariest cultural warrior will have to make room for Jonathan Rose's Intellectual Life of the British Working Classes. . . . a passionate work of history that brings alive the forgotten people on whose behalf so much academic hot air is routinely expended."Daniel Akst, Wall Street Journal
�[E]ven the weariest cultural warrior will have to make room for Jonathan Rose�s Intellectual Life of the British Working Classes. . . . a passionate work of history that brings alive the forgotten people on whose behalf so much academic hot air is routinely expended.��Daniel Akst, Wall Street Journal
"It is my earnest wish that everyone would find some book out of which they would derive as much pleasure as I have done in reading The Intellectual Life of the British Working Classes."-Timothy Larsen, Books & Culture
"It is my earnest wish that everyone would find some book out of which they would derive as much pleasure as I have done in reading The Intellectual Life of the British Working Classes."�Timothy Larsen, Books & Culture
"It is my earnest wish that everyone would find some book out of which they would derive as much pleasure as I have done in reading The Intellectual Life of the British Working Classes."Timothy Larsen, Books & Culture
This item was reviewed in:
Guardian UK, July 2001
Wall Street Journal, August 2001
Choice, February 2002
Guardian UK, November 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Through its novel and challenging approach to literary history, this text gains access to politics, ideology, popular culture and social relationships across two centuries of British working class experience.
Unpaid Annotation
This prizewinning book provides an intellectual history of the British working classes from the pre-industrial era to the twentieth century. Drawing on workers' memoirs, social surveys, library registers, and more, the author discovers how members of the working classes educated themselves, which books they read, and how their reading influenced them.
Table of Contents
List of Tablesp. vii
Acknowledgementsp. viii
A Preface to a History of Audiencesp. 1
A Desire for Singularityp. 12
Scottish Overture Ip. 16
The Milkmaid's lliadp. 18
Knowledge and Powerp. 20
Literature and Dogmap. 29
Conservative Authors and Radical Readersp. 39
The Craftsman's Toolsp. 48
Mutual Improvementp. 58
Scottish Overture IIp. 59
Self-Culturep. 62
Proletarian Sciencep. 70
How They Got Onp. 73
Chekhov in Canning Townp. 79
A Common Culture?p. 83
The Difference Between Fact and Fictionp. 92
Cinderella as Documentaryp. 93
Audience Participationp. 98
Blood, Iron, and Scripturep. 102
New Crusoesp. 106
Pickwickian Realismp. 111
A Conservative Canonp. 116
A General Theory of Rubishp. 120
The People's Bardp. 122
The Hundred Best Booksp. 125
Everyman's Libraryp. 131
Catching Upp. 136
Willingly to Schoolp. 146
A Better-Than-Nothing Institutep. 151
Possibilities of Infinitudep. 156
Strict but Justp. 168
Parental Supportp. 172
Unmanly Educationp. 177
Regrets and Discontentsp. 182
Cultural Literacy in the Classic Slump. 187
Sheffield 1918p. 190
Wagner and Hoot Gibsonp. 196
Aristotle and Dr. Stopesp. 206
Current Affairsp. 220
The Right to Languagep. 223
The Most Unlikely People Buy Books Nowp. 230
The Welsh Miners' Librariesp. 237
An Underground Universityp. 238
Marx, Jane Eyre, Tarzanp. 244
Decline and Fallp. 253
The Whole Contention Concerning the Workers' Educational Associationp. 256
The Ruskin Rebellionp. 258
The Difficulty about Thatp. 265
What Did the Students Want?p. 282
The Rewardp. 292
Alienation from Marxismp. 298
Evangelical Materalismp. 300
Have You Read Marx?p. 305
Unethical Socialismp. 307
Stalin Reads Thackerayp. 315
The World Unvisitedp. 321
Greyfriars' Childrenp. 322
Adolescent Propagandap. 331
Marlborough and All Thatp. 335
A Map of the Worldp. 341
Building Jerusalemp. 350
To the Westp. 353
Recessionalp. 362
A Mongrel Libraryp. 365
The Function of Penny Dreadfulsp. 367
Poverty and Indiscriminationp. 371
Boys' Stories for Girlsp. 379
The Dog That Was Downp. 381
Uses and Gratificationsp. 386
What Was Leonard Bast Really Like?p. 393
Restricting Literacyp. 394
The Insubordination of the Clerksp. 401
The Bridgep. 413
By Office Boys for Office Boysp. 417
The Better Holep. 421
Cultural Triagep. 431
Down and Out in Bloomsburyp. 439
On the Fringep. 439
Where is Bohemia?p. 447
Before the Youth Culturep. 453
What Went Wrong?p. 455
Notesp. 465
Indexp. 518
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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