Catalogue


Witchcraft, magic and superstition, 1640-70 /
Frederick Valletta.
imprint
Aldershot ; Burlington : Ashgate, 2000.
description
xiv, 272 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0754602443
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot ; Burlington : Ashgate, 2000.
isbn
0754602443
catalogue key
4353802
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Frederick Valletta was born in Paris in 1959 and educated at Milton Abbey School in Dorset. After leaving school he served in the Metropolitan Police for nine years, leaving with the rank of sergeant. He then attended King's College, University of London, to read history, and completed his doctoral thesis in 1998. He has presented three papers to the Institute of Historical Research and is currently working on the role of cunning folk in seventeenth-century England. He lives in Greenwich with his wife and family, and is employed by the London Borough of Bexley as a history teacher
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2001
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Summaries
Main Description
This study examines the relationship between élite and popular beliefs in witchcraft, magic and superstition in England, analyzing such beliefs against the background of political, religious and social upheaval characteristic of the Civil War, Interregnum and Restoration periods.
Long Description
This study examines the relationship between élite and popular beliefs in witchcraft, magic and superstition in England, analyzing such beliefs against the background of political, religious and social upheaval characteristic of the Civil War, Interregnum and Restoration periods.Belief in witchcraft received new impulses because of the general ferment of religious ideas and the tendency of participants in the Civil Wars to resort to imagery drawn from beliefs about the devil and witches; or to use portents to argue for the wrongs of their opponents. Throughout the work, the author stresses that deeply held superstitions were fundamental to belief in witches, the devil, ghosts, apparitions and supernatural healing. Despite the fact that popular superstitions were often condemned, it was recognized that their propaganda value was too useful to ignore. A host of pamphlets and treatises were published during this period which unashamedly incorporated such beliefs. Valletta here explores the manner in which political and religious authorities somewhat cynically used demonic imagery and language to discredit their opponents and to manipulate popular opinion.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vii
List of Tablesp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Glossaryp. xiii
Abbreviationsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
The Background to Witchcraft, Magic and Superstitionp. 11
The Devil, Demonology and its Relation to Witchcraftp. 27
Ghosts, Apparitions and Prodigies: Superstition or Signs from God?p. 63
Healing, Cunning Folk and Witchcraftp. 95
Witchcraft, Law and Popular Beliefp. 127
The Practice of Witchcraftp. 153
Psychological Aspects to Witchcraft and Popular Belief, 1640-70p. 189
Conclusionp. 217
Alphabetical List of Witches by Countyp. 223
Sympathetic Magicp. 237
The Humoral System of Medicinep. 239
Bibliographyp. 241
Indexp. 265
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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