Catalogue


Migrants against slavery : Virginians and the nation /
Philip J. Schwarz.
imprint
Charlottesville : University Press of Virginia, 2001.
description
xii, 250 p. : ill., maps
ISBN
0813920086 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Charlottesville : University Press of Virginia, 2001.
isbn
0813920086 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4349721
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Philip J. Schwarz is Professor of History at Virginia Commonwealth University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-12-01:
This wonderful book looks at the thousands of Virginians who left before the Civil War because of slavery. Based on impressive historical detective work, Schwarz (history, VA Commonwealth) sketches a variety of subjects in readable prose: fugitive slaves, freed people forced out of Virginia, whites who preferred to live in a free state and became leaders of the abolitionist movement. After a general overview of the national impact of such migrants, Schwarz illuminates the subject with four in-depth portraits: George Boxley, the white Spotsylvania County shopkeeper who fled first to Ohio and then to Indiana after trying to organize a slave revolt in 1815; the family of George T. Gilliam, who left Virginia to pass as white and achieve prosperity in the north; the 300 slaves of Samuel Gist, freed under their master's will but also consigned by its stipulations to poverty in Ohio; and Dangerfield Newby, freed by his father and taken to Ohio, only to return to Virginia and die fighting with John Brown. Of significance for fields ranging from migration, race relations, and slavery to the Old South and the Old Northwest. General collection. T. D. Hamm Earlham College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2001
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Summaries
Main Description
A significant number of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Virginians migrated north and west with the intent of extricating themselves from a slave society. All sought some kind of freedom: whites who left the Old Dominion to escape from slavery refused to live any longer as slave owners or as participants in a society grounded in bondage; fugitive slaves attempted to liberate themselves; free African Americans searched for greater opportunity.In Migrants against Slavery Philip J. Schwarz suggests that antislavery migrant Virginians, both the famous--such as fugitive Anthony Burns and abolitionist Edward Coles--and the lesser known, deserve closer scrutiny. Their migration and its aftermath, he argues, intensified the national controversy over human bondage, playing a larger role than previous historians have realized in shaping American identity and in Americans' effort to define the meaning of freedom.
Main Description
A significant number of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Virginians migrated north and west with the intent of extricating themselves from a slave society. All sought some kind of freedom: whites who left the Old Dominion to escape from slavery refused to live any longer as slave owners or as participants in a society grounded in bondage; fugitive slaves attempted to liberate themselves; free African Americans searched for greater opportunity. In Migrants against Slavery Philip J. Schwarz suggests that antislavery migrant Virginians, both the famous--such as fugitive Anthony Burns and abolitionist Edward Coles--and the lesser known, deserve closer scrutiny. Their migration and its aftermath, he argues, intensified the national controversy over human bondage, playing a larger role than previous historians have realized in shaping American identity and in Americans' effort to define the meaning of freedom.
Unpaid Annotation
A significant number of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Virginians migrated north and west with the intent of extricating themselves from a slave society. All sought some kind of freedom: Whites who left the Old Dominion to escape from slavery refused to live any longer as slave owners or as participants in a society grounded in bondage; fugitive slaves attempted to liberate themselves; free African Americans searched for greater opportunity.In Migrants against Slavery Philip J. Schwarz suggests that antislavery migrant Virginians, both the famous -- such as fugitive Anthony Burns and abolitionist Edward Coles -- and the lesser known, deserve closer scrutiny. Their migration and its aftermath, he argues, intensified the national controversy over human bondage, playing a larger role than previous historians have realized in shaping American identity and in Americans' effort to define the meaning of freedom.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
List of Tablesp. x
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
The Virginia Fugitives' Experiencep. 18
Fugitive Virginians and the Nationp. 40
The National Impactp. 63
George Boxley, "Not Found"p. 85
The Gilliams' Dilemmap. 102
The Gist Settlements in Ohiop. 122
The Newby Families in Virginia and Ohiop. 149
"A More Free Land than Virginia"p. 169
The Will of Samuel Gistp. 177
Notesp. 181
Indexp. 239
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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