Catalogue

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Return of the dragon : China's wounded nationalism /
Maria Hsia Chang.
imprint
Boulder, Colo. : Westview Press, 2001.
description
x, 257 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0813338565
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Boulder, Colo. : Westview Press, 2001.
isbn
0813338565
catalogue key
4295834
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Maria Hsia Chang is Professor of Political Science at the University of Nevada, Reno.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-12-01:
Pity the poor subject catalogers who find this book waiting on their work desks. Although the putative subject is nationalism, chapters venture into Chinese mythology, ancient and imperial history, modern history, political ideology, and village elections in contemporary China. The purpose of the book is to alert Western readers, especially in the US, of the bellicose and expansive nature of Chinese nationalism. The latter part of the volume concentrates on this message, while dismissing any evidence that China may be gradually transforming into a less dangerous polity. This heavily researched book is highly selective in its sources, choosing only those that present a worst-case scenario. At times, this leads to outlandish assertions, e.g., China will have an arsenal of mobile ICBMs by 2001. It is a work of policy prescription for Washington more than scholarship on the complex realities of today's China. But as an example of those who fear the worst for the future of Sino-American relations, Chang provides a good case. The absence of a bibliography serves to disguise the bias in source selections. For general readers, upper-division undergraduates and above. H. Nelsen University of South Florida
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2001
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Summaries
Main Description
As Maoism recedes, and especially after the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, Beijing has increasingly turned to patriotic nationalism for its ideological inspiration and legitimation. Return of the Dragon begins with a discussion of the definitions, typologies, and theories of nationalism. The formation and development of the Chinese people are explored, including their myths of origins, early beginnings, the classical feudal period, and the enduring state and empire of the Middle Kingdom. The Opium War began the "hundred years of humiliation" when dynastic China steadily deteriorated and eventually succumbed to the forces unleashed by imperialism. Western and Japanese imperialism also transformed the Chinese from a people into a nation. The ideas of early Chinese nationalists are explored, particularly those of Sun Yat-sen, whose thought stands in stark contrast to those of Mao, but shares significant similarities with the developmental nationalism of Deng Xiaoping.The last chapters of Return of the Dragon describe contemporary China's patriotic nationalism as it is represented in the writings of Chinese intellectuals, the youth, and the military. The portrait that emerges is a disquieting mix of narcissism and insecurity, wounded pride and resentment, a Darwinian worldview and an irredentist resolve to restore China to its former glory. The book concludes with an examination of the Chinese polity that remains authoritarian, as well as U.S. policy implications.
Main Description
As Maoism recedes, and especially after the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, Beijing has increasingly turned to patriotic nationalism for its ideological inspiration and legitimation. Return of the Dragon begins with a discussion of the definitions, typologies, and theories of nationalism. The formation and development of the Chinese people are explored, including their myths of origins, early beginnings, the classical feudal period, and the enduring state and empire of the Middle Kingdom. The Opium War began the "hundred years of humiliation" when dynastic China steadily deteriorated and eventually succumbed to the forces unleashed by imperialism. Western and Japanese imperialismalso transformed the Chinese from a people into a nation. The ideas of early Chinese nationalists are explored, particularly those of Sun Yat-sen, whose thought stands in stark contrast to those of Mao, but shares significant similarities with the developmental nationalism of Deng Xiaoping.The last chapters of Return of the Dragon describe contemporary China's patriotic nationalism as it is represented in the writings of Chinese intellectuals, the youth, and the military. The portrait that emerges is a disquieting mix of narcissism and insecurity, wounded pride and resentment, a Darwinian worldview and an irredentist resolve to restore China to its former glory. The book concludes with an examination of the Chinese polity that remains authoritarian, as well as U.S. policy implications.
Main Description
As Maoism recedes, and especially after the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, Beijing has increasingly turned to patriotic nationalism for its ideological inspiration and legitimation.Return of the Dragonbegins with a discussion of the definitions, typologies, and theories of nationalism. The formation and development of the Chinese people are explored, including their myths of origins, early beginnings, the classical feudal period, and the enduring state and empire of the Middle Kingdom. The Opium War began the "hundred years of humiliation" when dynastic China steadily deteriorated and eventually succumbed to the forces unleashed by imperialism. Western and Japanese imperialism also transformed the Chinese from a people into a nation. The ideas of early Chinese nationalists are explored, particularly those of Sun Yat-sen, whose thought stands in stark contrast to those of Mao, but shares significant similarities with the developmental nationalism of Deng Xiaoping.The last chapters ofReturn of the Dragondescribe contemporary China's patriotic nationalism as it is represented in the writings of Chinese intellectuals, the youth, and the military. The portrait that emerges is a disquieting mix of narcissism and insecurity, wounded pride and resentment, a Darwinian worldview and an irredentist resolve to restore China to its former glory. The book concludes with an examination of the Chinese polity that remains authoritarian, as well as U.S. policy implications.
Unpaid Annotation
As Maoism recedes, and especially after the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, Beijing has increasingly turned to patriotic nationalism for its ideological inspiration and legitimation. Return of the Dragon begins with a discussion of the concept and theory of nationalism. The formation and development of the Chinese people are explored, including their myths of origins, early beginnings, the classical feudal period, and the enduring state and empire of the Middle Kingdom. The last chapters of Return of the Dragon describe contemporary China's patriotic nationalism as it is represented in the writings of Chinese intellectuals, the youth, and the military. The book concludes with an examination of the Chinese polity that remains authoritarian, and of U.S. policy implications.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
The Problemp. 1
On Nationalismp. 13
Children of the Dragonp. 33
One Hundred Years of Humiliationp. 57
The Early Nationalistsp. 87
The Developmental Nationalist Ideology of Sun Yat-senp. 107
From Mao Zedong to Deng Xiaopingp. 141
Patriotic Nationalism of the People's Republicp. 175
Chinese Irredentist Nationalismp. 205
The Other Face of Janusp. 227
Indexp. 249
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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