Catalogue


The wind of the hundred days : how Washington mismanaged globalization /
Jagdish Bhagwati.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c2000.
description
xxiii, 383 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0262024950 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c2000.
isbn
0262024950 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4287507
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-09-01:
Perhaps the foremost international trade economist of the last few decades, Bhagwati (Columbia Univ.) presents a companion volume to A Stream of Windows: Unsettling Reflections on Trade, Immigration, and Democracy (1998). Both volumes consist of his previously published essays, speeches, book reviews, and letters to editors. While his pure economic theory is mostly inaccessible to noneconomists, these pieces are meant for a wider audience. Bhagwati is one of the deepest, most articulate, and most analytical thinkers writing about economics in the English language. He trusts economic theory and follows where it leads, but he is also keenly aware of the importance of noneconomic values and the need to check theory against empirical observation. In this volume he articulates his views on globalization and the US's failure in managing external economic policy. He is a free trader who disparages NAFTA, a proglobalization economist who writes analytically about the dangers of free capital flows, a passionate proponent of policies to help the world's poor who opposes the linkage of labor standards to trade agreements, and a proponent of looser immigration policies as a core American value. His ideas are clear, challenging, and always worth consideration. Readers may find reasons to disagree, but they cannot ignore him. General readers; upper-division undergraduate through professional audiences. J. Gerber San Diego State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Beware anti-globalizers! Your most formidable opponent speaks out with his customary eloquence, wit, and incisive reasoning." - Sylvia Ostry , Distinguished Research Fellow, Munk Centre for International Studies, University of Toronto
"Beware anti-globalizers! Your most formidable opponent speaks out with his customary eloquence, wit, and incisive reasoning." -Sylvia Ostry, Distinguished Research Fellow, Munk Centre for International Studies, University of Toronto
"Beware anti-globalizers! Your most formidable opponent speaks outwith his customary eloquence, wit, and incisive reasoning." Sylvia Ostry , Distinguished Research Fellow, Munk Centre for International Studies, University of Toronto
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, January 2001
Choice, September 2001
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In The Wind of the Hundred Days, a new collection of public policy essays, Jagdish Bhagwati applies his characteristic wit and accessible style to the subject of globalization. Notably, he argues that the true Clinton scandal lay in the administration's mismanagement of globalization-resulting in the paradox of immense domestic policy success combined with dramatic failure on the external front. Bhagwati assigns the bulk of the blame for the East Asian financial and economic crisis-a disaster that prompts him to use as his title the poet Octavio Paz's image of devastation "I met the wind of the hundred days"-to the administration's hasty push for financial liberalization in the region. The administration, Bhagwati claims, has also mishandled the freeing of trade. The administration-hosted WTO meeting in Seattle ended in chaos and the launch of a new round of multilateral trade negotiations was dashed. Bhagwati shows how the administration's failure to get Congress to renew fast-track authority can be attributed to an unimaginative response to the demands of a growing civil society. In several essays, he shows how free trade and social agendas both could have been pursued successfully if the concerns of human rights, environmental, cultural, and labor activists had been met through creative programs at appropriate international agencies such as the International Labour Organization instead of the WTO and via trade treaties. Bhagwati also criticizes the claim that "globalization needs a human face," arguing that it already has one. He faults the administration for embracing unsubstantiated anti-globalization rhetoric that has made its own preferred option of pursuing globalization that much more difficult.
Main Description
In The Wind of the Hundred Days, a new collection of public policy essays, Jagdish Bhagwati applies his characteristic wit and accessible style to the subject of globalization. Notably, he argues that the true Clinton scandal lay in the administration's mismanagement of globalization -- resulting in the paradox of immense domestic policy success combined with dramatic failure on the external front. Bhagwati assigns the bulk of the blame for the East Asian financial and economic crisis -- a disaster that prompts him to use as his title the poet Octavio Paz's image of devastation "I met the wind of the hundred days" -- to the administration's hasty push for financial liberalization in the region.The administration, Bhagwati claims, has also mishandled the freeing of trade. The administration-hosted WTO meeting in Seattle ended in chaos and the launch of a new round of multilateral trade negotiations was dashed. Bhagwati shows how the administration's failure to get Congress to renew fast-track authority can be attributed to an unimaginative response to the demands of a growing civil society. In several essays, he shows how free trade and social agendas both could have been pursued successfully if the concerns of human-rights, environmental, cultural, and labor activists had been met through creative programs at appropriate international agencies such as the International Labour Organization instead of the WTO and via trade treaties. Bhagwati also criticizes the claim that "globalization needs a human face," arguing that it already has one. He faults the administration for embracing unsubstantiated anti-globalization rhetoric that has made its own preferred option of pursuing globalization that much more difficult.
Main Description
In The Wind of the Hundred Days , a new collection of public policy essays, Jagdish Bhagwati applies his characteristic wit and accessible style to the subject of globalization. Notably, he argues that the true Clinton scandal lay in the administration's mismanagement of globalization-resulting in the paradox of immense domestic policy success combined with dramatic failure on the external front. Bhagwati assigns the bulk of the blame for the East Asian financial and economic crisis-a disaster that prompts him to use as his title the poet Octavio Paz's image of devastation "I met the wind of the hundred days"-to the administration's hasty push for financial liberalization in the region. The administration, Bhagwati claims, has also mishandled the freeing of trade. The administration-hosted WTO meeting in Seattle ended in chaos and the launch of a new round of multilateral trade negotiations was dashed. Bhagwati shows how the administration's failure to get Congress to renew fast-track authority can be attributed to an unimaginative response to the demands of a growing civil society. In several essays, he shows how free trade and social agendas both could have been pursued successfully if the concerns of human rights, environmental, cultural, and labor activists had been met through creative programs at appropriate international agencies such as the International Labour Organization instead of the WTO and via trade treaties. Bhagwati also criticizes the claim that "globalization needs a human face," arguing that it already has one. He faults the administration for embracing unsubstantiated anti-globalization rhetoric that has made its own preferred option of pursuing globalization that much more difficult.
Main Description
In The Wind of the Hundred Days, a new collection of public policy essays, Jagdish Bhagwati applies his characteristic wit and accessible style to the subject of globalization. Notably, he argues that the true Clinton scandal lay in the administration's mismanagement of globalization -- resulting in the paradox of immense domestic policy success combined with dramatic failure on the external front. Bhagwati assigns the bulk of the blame for the East Asian financial and economic crisis -- a disaster that prompts him to use as his title the poet Octavio Paz's image of devastation "I met the wind of the hundred days" -- to the administration's hasty push for financial liberalization in the region. The administration, Bhagwati claims, has also mishandled the freeing of trade. The administration-hosted WTO meeting in Seattle ended in chaos and the launch of a new round of multilateral trade negotiations was dashed. Bhagwati shows how the administration's failure to get Congress to renew fast-track authority can be attributed to an unimaginative response to the demands of a growing civil society. In several essays, he shows how free trade and social agendas both could have been pursued successfully if the concerns of human-rights, environmental, cultural, and labor activists had been met through creative programs at appropriate international agencies such as the International Labour Organization instead of the WTO and via trade treaties. Bhagwati also criticizes the claim that "globalization needs a human face," arguing that it already has one. He faults the administration for embracing unsubstantiated anti-globalization rhetoric that has made its own preferred option of pursuing globalization that much more difficult.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
The Two-Edged Sword: Capital Flowsp. 1
The Capital Myth: The Difference between Trade in Widgets and Dollarsp. 3
Why Free Capital Mobility May Be Hazardous to Your Healthp. 13
Free Trade, Yes; Free Capital Flows, Maybep. 21
From Miracle to Debacle: The Asian Dramap. 25
The "Miracle" That Did Happen: Understanding East Asia in Comparative Perspectivep. 27
The Asian Economic Crisis: What Do We Know Now?p. 51
A Friend in the United States, but a Crony in Asiap. 61
Free Trade Fair Trade, Wages, and Human Rightsp. 65
Free Trade in the Twenty-First Century: Managing Viruses, Phobias, and Social Agendasp. 69
Free Trade: Why the AFL-CIO, Ralph Nader, and the Sierra Club Should Like Itp. 87
The Folly of "Fair Trade"p. 105
Is Free Trade Working for Everyone?p. 109
Play It Again, Sam: A New Look at Trade and Wagesp. 121
Globalization: Who Gains, Who Loses?p. 137
Moral Obligations and Tradep. 153
Trade Linkage and Human Rightsp. 157
On the Efficacy of Trade Sanctionsp. 169
Fast Track: Not So Fastp. 173
Short on Trade Visionp. 177
Global Fixesp. 179
Fifty Years: Looking Back, Looking Forwardp. 183
On Thinking Clearly about the Linkage between Trade and the Environmentp. 189
Mismanaging the Banana Disputep. 203
An Economic Perspective on the Dispute Settlement Mechanismp. 205
Trade and Culture: America's Blind Spotp. 209
The West's Triumph: Did Culture Do It?p. 215
Regionalism, Multilateralism, and Unilateralismp. 225
Fast Track to Nowherep. 227
On the Perils of SAPTAp. 235
The FTAA Is Not Free Tradep. 239
Think Big, Mr. Clintonp. 251
In Favor of China's Entry into WTOp. 255
Free Trade without Treatiesp. 261
The Debacle in Seattlep. 265
WTO's First Round: The Seattle Agendap. 267
Labour Standards and the WTO: The Case of Separate Agendasp. 273
Don't Muddy the Watersp. 281
Did Clinton Take a Dive in Seattle?p. 285
What Really Happened in Seattle?p. 287
Investment and Immigrationp. 291
Illegals in Our Midst: Getting Policy Wrongp. 293
Why Borjas Fails to Persuadep. 299
A Close Look at the Newest Newcomers: Immigration Debate Takes Skillp. 309
Who Needs the Multilateral Agreement on Investment?p. 313
Globalizationp. 315
But Mr. Clinton, Globalization Has a Human Facep. 317
Globalization, Sovereignty, and Democracyp. 323
Poverty and Reforms: Friends or Foes?p. 343
Growth Is Not a Passive "Trickle-Down" Strategyp. 357
Living with Globalizationp. 359
The Global Debatep. 363
Globalization in Your Facep. 365
Indexp. 373
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem