Catalogue


The writing of royalism, 1628-1660 /
Robert Wilcher.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
description
xii, 403 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521661838 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
isbn
0521661838 (hardback)
catalogue key
4282651
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-09-01:
This study is a hybrid. Neither a history of the partisans of King Charles I, nor yet the literature of these Cavalier writers--here called "royalists"--it is a most readable, up-to-date admixture of both during one of the most significant periods in English history. Wilcher (Univ. of Birmingham, UK) does not revive the historical criticism of the mid-20th century, nor does he focus on critical analyses of the writings of the royalists, whose names are both familiar (Carew, Suckling, Cowley, Marvell, Vaughan) and not (George Daniel, Thomas Jordan, John Denham, Alexander Brome, to name a few). Yet he manages to deftly address the forms of writing: panegyric, pastoral, masque, and even "the genre of mock petition." Wilcher focuses on the writing as it reveals its authors and as they reveal the political constructs. And Wilcher is an excellent guide in this partisan wilderness. Employing a chronological, narrative approach, he attempts to "reveal unexpected insights into the ways individuals and groups perceived and tried to influence the course of history during a period of rapid and disorienting change." He succeeds admirably, establishing a strong counterbalance to the Puritan writings of the period. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. E. J. Zimmermann emeritus, Canisius College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Excellent." Studies in English Literature
"Magisterial." Renaissance Quarterly
'... a thorough, well-informed, clearly written and intensely responsible survey of a kind which ought to win over any historians still sceptical about whether narrative history and literature can be combined.' History
‘… a thorough, well-informed, clearly written and intensely responsible survey of a kind which ought to win over any historians still sceptical about whether narrative history and literature can be combined.’History
"...most readable...succeeds admirably..." Choice
"When seen in relation to the poets and the forces of revolutionary change, these royalist expressions contribte to the contexts that make this well-written book a very substantial and worthwhile contribution to the historical and literary study of the decades that transformed seventeeth-century England." Albion
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2001
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
In The Writing of Royalism, Robert Wilcher charts the political and ideological development of 'royalism' between 1628 and 1660. His study situates a wide range of minor and canonical texts in the tumultuous political contexts of the time, helpfully integrating them into a detailed historical narrative.
Main Description
In The Writing of Royalism, Robert Wilcher charts the political and ideological development of 'royalism' between 1628 and 1660. His study of the literature and propaganda produced by those who adhered to the crown during the civil wars and their aftermath takes in many kinds of writing to provide a comprehensive account of the emergence of a partisan literature in support of the English monarchy and Church. Wilcher situates a wide range of minor and canonical texts in the tumultuous political contexts of the time, helpfully integrating them into a detailed historical narrative. He illustrates the role of literature in forging a party committed to the military defence of royalist values and determined to sustain them in defeat. The Writing of Royalism casts light on the complex phenomenon of 'royalism' by making available a wealth of material that should be of interest to historians as well as literary scholars.
Main Description
In The Writing of Royalism, Robert Wilcher charts the political and ideological development of "royalism" between 1628 and 1660. His study situates a wide range of minor and canonical texts in the tumultuous political contexts of the time, helpfully integrating them into a detailed historical narrative. He illustrates the role of literature in forging a party committed to the military defense of royalist values and determined to sustain them in defeat.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study charts the political and ideological development of royalism between 1628 and 1660. It casts a new light on the complex phenomenon of royalism by making available a wealth of material that should be of interest to historians.
Table of Contents
Illustrations
Acknowledgements
Introduction
The halcyon days: 1628û1637
The BishopÆs Wars and the Short Parliament: July 1637 û October 1640
The Long Parliament and the trial of Strafford: November 1640 û May 1641
The beginnings of constitutional royalism: May û October 1641
The emergence of the constitutional royalists: October 1641û March 1642
The beginning of hostilities: March 1642 - April 1643
Learning to write the war: April û September 1643
Declining fortunes: from Newbury to Marston Moor: September 1643 û June 1644
Defeat, captivity, and exile: July 1644 û September 1647
Trial and martyrdom: September 1647 û January 1649
Lamenting the King: 1649
Coping with defeat and waiting for the King: 1649û1660
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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