Catalogue


Ad hoc networking /
Charles E. Perkins, editor.
imprint
Boston : Addison-Wesley, c2001.
description
xii, 370 p. : ill.
ISBN
0201309769
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
imprint
Boston : Addison-Wesley, c2001.
isbn
0201309769
catalogue key
4273248
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Charles E. Perkins is a Research Fellow at Nokia Research Center investigating mobile wireless networking and dynamic configuration protocols. He is the editor for several ACM and IEEE journals for areas relating to wireless networking. Charles has served on the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and on various committees for the National Research Council
Excerpts
Introduction or Preface
The field of ad hoc networking is reemerging amid unprecedented growth in the scale and diversity of computer networking. New horizons for wireless connectivity have come into view along with a new sense of the inevitability of wireless data transmission over IP, the Internet Protocol that patches the Internet together. With new wireless products and research have come a more widespread familiarity between network protocol engineers and wireless media and some recognition that wireless media are almost as good as wired media for transmitting data--as long as one can overlook the differences in transmission speed. Almost--or perhaps even better--because of the dramatically greater convenience promised by mobile computing. Unfortunately, there is another reason that mobile computing is often not trulyas convenient as conventional computing. The Internet cannot yet handle mobile computers very well. Although this situation is changing quickly, almost no one would disagree that a fixed computer with wired media offers a better computing and communications environment than a mobile wireless computer--even more so for PDAs. The task set before today's network engineers is to eliminate the shortcomings of mobile computers and wireless media so that the inherent convenience of mobility will no longer suffer the burden of inadequate or inappropriate system design. Part of the inadequacy of current system design starts with the outdated assumptions made in the network and routing protocols deployed in the Internet today. Many efforts to repair these outdated assumptions rely on additional infrastructure elements for managing data related to mobile computers--for example, Mobile IP--and various proxy architectures. These efforts and others offer new design perspectives that either preserve the time-honored end-to-end model of Internet communications or that offer new models aimed at improving user experience. Perhaps naturally, the wide deployment of the Internet has provided additional impetus for exploring the benefits of computer internetworking even for situations in which neither the Internet per se nor any other internetwork is reachable. In such situations, one might still wish to use familiar network programs to carry on the same kinds of interactive computing with neighbors and associates in the area. Network programs can typically continue to work as long as they can identify the IP address of the desired destination and a path of one or more network links toward the destination. Finding such paths is the job of ad hoc network algorithms and protocols. Exploring that design space has been an increasingly active area of research in the last few years. It is our hope that the diverse algorithms and protocols described in this book will give the reader a good idea of the current state of the art in ad hoc networking. The authors of each chapter are among the foremost practitioners in the field, and each one will no doubt try to convince the reader that his or her approach is best. The result may be as confusing or as delightful as trying to order the best meal in a fabulous restaurant with a menu created by a crew of creative and distinctively different chefs. Bon Appetit! 0201309769P04062001
Introduction or Preface
The field of ad hoc networking is reemerging amid unprecedented growth in the scale and diversity of computer networking. New horizons for wireless connectivity have come into view along with a new sense of the inevitability of wireless data transmission over IP, the Internet Protocol that patches the Internet together. With new wireless products and research have come a more widespread familiarity between network protocol engineers and wireless media and some recognition that wireless media are almost as good as wired media for transmitting data--as long as one can overlook the differences in transmission speed.Almost--or perhapseven better--because of the dramatically greater convenience promised by mobile computing. Unfortunately, there is another reason that mobile computing is often nottrulyas convenient as conventional computing. The Internet cannot yet handle mobile computers very well. Although this situation is changing quickly, almost no one would disagree that a fixed computer with wired media offers a better computing and communications environment than a mobile wireless computer--even more so for PDAs. The task set before today's network engineers is to eliminate the shortcomings of mobile computers and wireless media so that the inherent convenience of mobility will no longer suffer the burden of inadequate or inappropriate system design. Part of the inadequacy of current system design starts with the outdated assumptions made in the network and routing protocols deployed in the Internet today. Many efforts to repair these outdated assumptions rely on additional infrastructure elements for managing data related to mobile computers--for example, Mobile IP--and various proxy architectures. These efforts and others offer new design perspectives that either preserve the time-honored end-to-end model of Internet communications or that offer new models aimed at improving user experience. Perhaps naturally, the wide deployment of the Internet has provided additional impetus for exploring the benefits of computer internetworking even for situations in which neither the Internet per se nor any other internetwork is reachable. In such situations, one might still wish to use familiar network programs to carry on the same kinds of interactive computing with neighbors and associates in the area. Network programs can typically continue to work as long as they can identify the IP address of the desired destination and a path of one or more network links toward the destination. Finding such paths is the job of ad hoc network algorithms and protocols. Exploring that design space has been an increasingly active area of research in the last few years. It is our hope that the diverse algorithms and protocols described in this book will give the reader a good idea of the current state of the art in ad hoc networking. The authors of each chapter are among the foremost practitioners in the field, and each one will no doubt try to convince the reader that his or her approach is best. The result may be as confusing or as delightful as trying to order the best meal in a fabulous restaurant with a menu created by a crew of creative and distinctively different chefs.Bon Appetit! 0201309769P04062001
First Chapter

The field of ad hoc networking is reemerging amid unprecedented growth in the scale and diversity of computer networking. New horizons for wireless connectivity have come into view along with a new sense of the inevitability of wireless data transmission over IP, the Internet Protocol that patches the Internet together. With new wireless products and research have come a more widespread familiarity between network protocol engineers and wireless media and some recognition that wireless media are almost as good as wired media for transmitting data--as long as one can overlook the differences in transmission speed.Almost--or perhapseven better--because of the dramatically greater convenience promised by mobile computing.

Unfortunately, there is another reason that mobile computing is often nottrulyas convenient as conventional computing. The Internet cannot yet handle mobile computers very well. Although this situation is changing quickly, almost no one would disagree that a fixed computer with wired media offers a better computing and communications environment than a mobile wireless computer--even more so for PDAs. The task set before today's network engineers is to eliminate the shortcomings of mobile computers and wireless media so that the inherent convenience of mobility will no longer suffer the burden of inadequate or inappropriate system design.

Part of the inadequacy of current system design starts with the outdated assumptions made in the network and routing protocols deployed in the Internet today. Many efforts to repair these outdated assumptions rely on additional infrastructure elements for managing data related to mobile computers--for example, Mobile IP--and various proxy architectures. These efforts and others offer new design perspectives that either preserve the time-honored end-to-end model of Internet communications or that offer new models aimed at improving user experience.

Perhaps naturally, the wide deployment of the Internet has provided additional impetus for exploring the benefits of computer internetworking even for situations in which neither the Internet per se nor any other internetwork is reachable. In such situations, one might still wish to use familiar network programs to carry on the same kinds of interactive computing with neighbors and associates in the area. Network programs can typically continue to work as long as they can identify the IP address of the desired destination and a path of one or more network links toward the destination.

Finding such paths is the job of ad hoc network algorithms and protocols. Exploring that design space has been an increasingly active area of research in the last few years. It is our hope that the diverse algorithms and protocols described in this book will give the reader a good idea of the current state of the art in ad hoc networking. The authors of each chapter are among the foremost practitioners in the field, and each one will no doubt try to convince the reader that his or her approach is best. The result may be as confusing or as delightful as trying to order the best meal in a fabulous restaurant with a menu created by a crew of creative and distinctively different chefs.Bon Appetit!



0201309769P04062001
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SciTech Book News, June 2001
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
"Ad hoc" networks are wireless, mobile networks that can be set up anywhere and anytime--outside the Internet or another preexisting network infrastructure. The field has tremendous commercial and military potential, supporting applications such as mobile conferencing outside the office, battlefield communications, and embedded sensor devices that automate everyday functions, among others. Ad Hoc Networkingis a collection of algorithms, protocols, and innovative ideas from the leading practitioners and researchers that will propel the technology toward mainstream deployment. It discusses numerous potential applications, reviews relevant networking concepts, and examines the various approaches that define emerging ad hoc networking technologies. Specific topics covered include: The Ad Hoc On-Demand Distance-Vector (AODV) protocol, which reduces memory and processing requirements The Dynamic Source Routing (DSR) algorithm, in which paths are carried along with the data packets Ad hoc networking for the military Cluster-based networks for transmission management and routing efficiency The Destination-Sequenced Distance-Vector (DSDV) protocol The Zone Routing Protocol (ZRP)--a hybrid proactive/reactive protocol The Temporally Ordered Routing Algorithm (TORA)--a link-reversal protocol The Associative Bit Routing (ABR) algorithm, in a chapter which addresses battery life concerns Source Tree Adaptive Routing (STAR) protocol--a bandwidth-efficient partial link-state algorithm Throughout this book, important issues--scalability, cost, bandwidth efficiency, power requirements, compatibility, quality of service, and security--are considered; possible solutions to these challenges are presented. With cutting-edge contributions by such leading experts as Scott Corson, Jim Freebersyser, J. J. Garcia-Luna-Aceves, Zygmunt Haas, David B. Johnson, Barry M. Leiner, Martha Steenstrup, and C-K. Toh, Ad Hoc Networking lays the foundation for the next generation of mobile computer networking. 0201309769B04062001
Back Cover Copy
"Ad hoc" networks are wireless, mobile networks that can be set up anywhere and anytime--outside the Internet or another preexisting network infrastructure. the field has tremendous commercial and military potential, supporting applications such as mobile conferencing outside the office, battlefield communications, and embedded sensor devices that automate everyday functions, among others. Ad Hoc Networking is a collection of algorithms, protocols, and innovative ideas from the leading practitioners and researchers that will propel the technology toward mainstream deployment. It discusses numerous potential applications, reviews relevant networking concepts, and examines the various approaches that define emerging ad hoc networking technologies. Specific topics covered include: The Ad Hoc On-Demand Distance-Vector (AODV) protocol, which reduces memory and processing requirements The Dynamic Source Routing (DSR) algorithm, in which paths are carried along with the data packets Ad hoc networking for the military Cluster-based networks for transmission management and routing efficiency The Destination-Sequenced Distance-Vector (DSDV) protocol The Zone Routing Protocol (ZRP)--a hybrid proactive/reactive protocol The Temporally Ordered Routing Algorithm (TORA)--a link-reversal protocol The Associative Bit Routing (ABR) algorithm, in a chapter which addresses battery life concerns Source Tree Adaptive Routing (STAR) protocol--a bandwidth-efficient partial link-state algorithm Throughout this book, important issues--scalability, cost, bandwidth efficiency, power requirements, compatibility, quality of service, and security--are considered; possible solutions to these challenges are presented. With cutting-edge contributions by such leading experts as Scott Corson, Jim Freebersyser, J. J. Garcia-Luna-Aceves, Zygmunt Haas, David B. Johnson, Barry M. Leiner, Martha Steenstrup, and C-K. Toh, Ad Hoc Networking lays the foundation for the next generation of mobile computer networking. 0201309769B04062001
Back Cover Copy
"Ad hoc" networks are wireless, mobile networks that can be set up anywhere and anytime--outside the Internet or another preexisting network infrastructure. The field has tremendous commercial and military potential, supporting applications such as mobile conferencing outside the office, battlefield communications, and embedded sensor devices that automate everyday functions, among others.Ad Hoc Networking is a collection of algorithms, protocols, and innovative ideas from the leading practitioners and researchers that will propel the technology toward mainstream deployment. It discusses numerous potential applications, reviews relevant networking concepts, and examines the various approaches that define emerging ad hoc networking technologies. Specific topics covered include:--The Ad Hoc On-Demand Distance-Vector (AODV) protocol, which reduces memory and processing requirements-The Dynamic Source Routing (DSR) algorithm, in which paths are carried along with the data packets-Ad hoc networking for the military-Cluster-based networks for transmission management and routing efficiency-The Destination-Sequenced Distance-Vector (DSDV) protocol-The Zone Routing Protocol (ZRP)--a hybrid proactive/reactive protocol-The Temporally Ordered Routing Algorithm (TORA)--a link-reversal protocol-The Associative Bit Routing (ABR) algorithm, in a chapter which addresses battery life concerns-Source Tree Adaptive Routing (STAR) protocol--a bandwidth-efficient partial link-state algorithmThroughout this book, important issues--scalability, cost, bandwidth efficiency, power requirements, compatibility, quality of service, and security--are considered; possible solutions to these challenges are presented.With cutting-edge contributions by such leading experts as Scott Corson, Jim Freebersyser, J. J. Garcia-Luna-Aceves, Zygmunt Haas, David B. Johnson, Barry M. Leiner, Martha Steenstrup, and C-K. Toh, Ad Hoc Networking lays the foundation for the next generation of mobile computer networking.0201309769B04062001
Back Cover Copy
"Ad hoc" networks are wireless, mobile networks that can be set up anywhere and anytime--outside the Internet or another preexisting network infrastructure. The field has tremendous commercial and military potential, supporting applications such as mobile conferencing outside the office, battlefield communications, and embedded sensor devices that automate everyday functions, among others. Ad Hoc Networking is a collection of algorithms, protocols, and innovative ideas from the leading practitioners and researchers that will propel the technology toward mainstream deployment. It discusses numerous potential applications, reviews relevant networking concepts, and examines the various approaches that define emerging ad hoc networking technologies. Specific topics covered include: The Ad Hoc On-Demand Distance-Vector (AODV) protocol, which reduces memory and processing requirements The Dynamic Source Routing (DSR) algorithm, in which paths are carried along with the data packets Ad hoc networking for the military Cluster-based networks for transmission management and routing efficiency The Destination-Sequenced Distance-Vector (DSDV) protocol The Zone Routing Protocol (ZRP)--a hybrid proactive/reactive protocol The Temporally Ordered Routing Algorithm (TORA)--a link-reversal protocol The Associative Bit Routing (ABR) algorithm, in a chapter which addresses battery life concerns Source Tree Adaptive Routing (STAR) protocol--a bandwidth-efficient partial link-state algorithmThroughout this book, important issues--scalability, cost, bandwidth efficiency, power requirements, compatibility, quality of service, and security--are considered; possible solutions to these challenges are presented.With cutting-edge contributions by such leading experts as Scott Corson, Jim Freebersyser, J. J. Garcia-Luna-Aceves, Zygmunt Haas, David B. Johnson, Barry M. Leiner, Martha Steenstrup, and C-K. Toh, Ad Hoc Networking lays the foundation for the next generation of mobile computer networking.0201309769B04062001
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xi
Ad Hoc Networking: An Introductionp. 1
Model of Operationp. 3
Symmetric Linksp. 6
Layer-2 Ad Hoc Solutionsp. 6
Proactive versus Reactive Protocolsp. 7
Multicastp. 8
Commercial Applications of Ad Hoc Networkingp. 8
Conferencingp. 9
Home Networkingp. 9
Emergency Servicesp. 10
Personal Area Networks and Bluetoothp. 10
Embedded Computing Applicationsp. 11
Sensor Dustp. 12
Automotive/PC Interactionp. 13
Other Envisioned Applicationsp. 14
Technical and Market Factors Affecting Ad Hoc Networksp. 14
Scalabilityp. 15
Power Budget versus Latencyp. 17
Protocol Deployment and Incompatible Standardsp. 17
Wireless Data Ratesp. 18
User Education and Acculturationp. 19
Additional Security Exposurep. 19
Spotty Coveragep. 20
General Comments on Routing Protocolsp. 20
Description of the Material Presentedp. 23
A DoD Perspective on Mobile Ad Hoc Networksp. 29
Motivationp. 30
The Pastp. 33
DARPA Packet Radio Networkp. 34
Survivable Radio Networksp. 35
Other DoD Efforts in MANETp. 36
Other Efforts in MANETp. 38
The Presentp. 39
Tactical Internetp. 41
ELBp. 41
GloMop. 42
IETF MANET Working Groupp. 44
The Futurep. 44
Commercial Applicationsp. 44
DoDp. 46
Open Research Issuesp. 47
Conclusionp. 48
DSDV: Routing over a Multihop Wireless Network of Mobile Computersp. 53
Introductionp. 54
Overview of Routing Methodsp. 55
Link-Statep. 55
Distance-Vectorp. 56
Destination-Sequenced Distance Vector Protocolp. 57
Protocol Overviewp. 57
Route Advertisementsp. 58
Route Table Entry Structurep. 58
Responding to Topology Changesp. 59
Route Selection Criteriap. 60
Operating DSDV at Layer 2p. 61
Extending Base Station Coveragep. 62
Examples of DSDV in Operationp. 62
Damping Fluctuationsp. 65
Properties of the DSDV Protocolp. 68
Comparison with other Methodsp. 70
Future Workp. 71
Summaryp. 72
Cluster-Based Networksp. 75
Clustering for Transmission Managementp. 77
Link-Cluster Architecturep. 77
Clustering for Backbone Formationp. 81
Near-Term Digital Radio Networkp. 81
Virtual Subnet Architecturep. 85
Clustering for Routing Efficiencyp. 90
Hierarchical Routingp. 91
Clusteringp. 127
Conclusionp. 135
DSR: The Dynamic Source Routing Protocol for Multihop Wireless Ad Hoc Networksp. 139
Assumptionsp. 141
DSR Protocol Description--Overview and Important Propertiesp. 143
DSR Route Discoveryp. 144
DSR Route Maintenancep. 146
Additional Route Discovery Featuresp. 147
Additional Route Maintenance Featuresp. 151
Support for Heterogeneous Networks and Mobile IPp. 154
Multicast Routing with DSRp. 158
Location of DSR Functions in the ISO Network Reference Modelp. 158
DSR Evaluationp. 159
Simulation Summaryp. 159
DSR Implementation and Testbed Summaryp. 162
Related Workp. 164
Conclusionp. 167
The Ad Hoc On-Demand Distance-Vector Protocolp. 173
AODV Propertiesp. 175
Unicast Route Establishmentp. 176
Route Discoveryp. 177
Expanding Ring Searchp. 178
Forward Path Setupp. 179
Route Maintenancep. 180
Local Connectivity Managementp. 181
Actions after Rebootp. 182
Multicast Route Establishmentp. 182
Route Discoveryp. 183
Forward Path Setupp. 184
Multicast Route Activation/Deactivationp. 184
Multicast Tree Maintanencep. 185
Actions after Rebootp. 190
Broadcastp. 190
Simulationsp. 191
Unicast Simulationsp. 192
Multicast Simulationsp. 197
Optimizations and Enhancementsp. 203
Quality of Servicep. 204
Subnet Routingp. 204
AODV and Mobile IPp. 205
Future Workp. 206
Securityp. 206
Asymmetric Routingp. 206
Conclusionp. 207
Message Formatsp. 209
Route Requestp. 209
Route Replyp. 210
Route Errorp. 211
Multicast Activationp. 212
Group Hellop. 213
Extension Formatsp. 214
Hello Intervalp. 214
Multicast Group Leaderp. 215
Multicast Group Rebuildp. 215
Multicast Group Informationp. 216
Maximum Delayp. 216
Minimum Bandwidthp. 217
Configuration Parametersp. 218
ZRP: A Hybrid Framework for Routing in Ad Hoc Networksp. 221
Reconfigurable Wireless Networksp. 221
The Communication Environment and the RWN Modelp. 223
The Zone Routing Protocolp. 225
Reactive versus Proactive Routingp. 225
Routing Zones and Intrazone Routingp. 227
Interzone Routing and the Zone Routing Protocolp. 228
ZRP--Formal Descriptionp. 232
Neighbor Discovery Protocolp. 232
The Intrazone Routing Protocolp. 234
The Interzone Routing Protocolp. 235
Evaluation of ZRPp. 240
Performance Resultsp. 244
Conclusionp. 249
Appendixp. 251
Link Reversal Routingp. 255
General Approachp. 255
The Gafni-Bertsekas Algorithmp. 258
The Lightweight Mobile Routing Algorithmp. 262
Protocol Descriptionp. 265
Properties of the Protocolp. 273
The Temporally Ordered Routing Algorithmp. 275
Protocol Descriptionp. 276
Properties of the Protocolp. 286
Comparison of LRR Algorithmsp. 295
Conclusionp. 295
The Effects of Beaconing on the Battery Life of Ad Hoc Mobile Computersp. 299
Motivationp. 299
Ad Hoc Wireless Networksp. 300
Power Issuesp. 301
Smart Batteries and Battery Characteristicsp. 301
Associativity Based Routingp. 303
ABR Protocol Descriptionp. 304
ABR Route Discovery Phasep. 304
Handling Mobility in ABRp. 305
ABR Route Deletion Phasep. 306
Effects of Beaconing on Battery Lifep. 306
Experimental Hardwarep. 307
Experimental Softwarep. 308
Experimental Results and Observationsp. 310
Standalone Beaconing at High Frequenciesp. 310
Standalone Beaconing at Low Frequenciesp. 313
Beaconing with Neighboring Nodes at High Frequenciesp. 314
Beaconing with Neighboring Nodes at Low Frequenciesp. 317
Deductionsp. 318
Conclusionp. 320
Bandwidth-Efficient Link-State Routing in Wireless Networksp. 323
Updating Routes in Wireless Networksp. 326
STAR Descriptionp. 328
Information Stored and Exchangedp. 329
Validating Updatesp. 330
Exchanging Update Messagesp. 330
Examplep. 336
Impact of the Link Layerp. 336
Performance Evaluationp. 338
Comparison with Table-Driven Protocolsp. 339
Comparison with On-Demand Routing Protocolsp. 340
Conclusionp. 347
Summary and Future Workp. 351
Future Workp. 351
Scalabilityp. 352
Quality of Servicep. 352
Is the Client-Server Model Viable?p. 353
Connecting to the Internetp. 354
Securityp. 355
Power Controlp. 356
Other Approachesp. 357
Location-Assisted Routingp. 357
Fisheye Routingp. 357
CEDARp. 358
A Possible Vision of the Futurep. 358
For More Informationp. 360
Indexp. 363
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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