Catalogue

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Modernist writing and reactionary politics /
Charles Ferrall.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
description
viii, 202 p.
ISBN
0521793459
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
isbn
0521793459
catalogue key
4272474
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This is a carefully researched, thoughtful exposition of the views of five influential modernists." Modernism/Modernity 11/01
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Charles Ferrall argues that the politics of Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Lawrence, and Wyndham Lewis was a response to the separation of art from an increasingly industrialised society. Fascism became attractive to these writers because it promised to reintegrate art into society while simultaneously guaranteeing its autonomy. Yet with the exception of Pound and Yeats, these writers all finally rejected fascism preferring instead to see the aesthetic as a sphere in permanent opposition to liberal democracy, rather than the basis for a new social order.
Description for Bookstore
Ferrall argues that the politics of Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Lawrence, and Wyndham Lewis were a response to the separation of art from an increasingly industrialised society. Fascism became attractive to these writers because it promised to reintegrate art into society while simultaneously guaranteeing its autonomy.
Main Description
Charles Ferrall argues that the politics of Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Lawrence, and Wyndham Lewis was a response to the separation of art from an increasingly industrialized society. Fascism became attractive to these writers because it promised to reintegrate art into society while simultaneously guaranteeing its autonomy. Yet with the exception of Pound and Yeats, these writers all finally rejected fascism, preferring instead to see the aesthetic as a sphere in permanent opposition to liberal democracy, rather than the basis for a new social order.
Main Description
In Modernist Writing and Reactionary Politics, Charles Ferrall argues that the politics of Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Lawrence, and Wyndham Lewis were a response to the separation of art from an increasingly industrialised society. Fascism became attractive to these writers because it promised to reintegrate art into society while simultaneously guaranteeing its autonomy. Yet with the exception of Pound and Yeats, these writers all finally rejected fascism, preferring instead to see the aesthetic as a sphere in permanent opposition to liberal democracy, rather than the basis for a new social order. Individual chapters focus on Yeats and decolonisation, Pound and 'the Jews', Eliot and the uncanny, and Lawrence and homosexuality, and Lewis and the Cartesian primitive. Ferrall's account of why some of the greatest writers of the early twentieth century became involved in reactionary politics offers new insights into the relation between modernist aesthetics, technology and avant-gardism.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction
W. B. Yeats and the family romance of Irish Nationalism
Ezra Pound and the poetics of literalism
'Neither Living nor Dead': T. S. Eliot and the uncanny
The homosocial and Fascism in D. H. Lawrence
'Always a Deux': Wyndham Lewis and his doubles
Works cited
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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